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The Grand Inquisitor
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13 Nov 2018, 5:00 am

I've been working full-time for 6 months now, and I'm starting to look towards what moving out would entail. I'm not planning to move out yet as I wouldn't have much left over from my work pay when bills are paid. At the moment moving out would mean I would lose a huge chunk of my disposable income, as I earn $650 a week and at the very cheapest I could rent on my own for about $200. I've also got a couple of other things I'm considering spending money on such as braces to straighten my teeth and potentially getting my glasses tinted so the sun doesn't get in the way of my view when riding my bike to work.

Even so, I want to start entertaining the idea and working out the logistics for moving out so I am as ready as possible when the time comes and I don't leave it go by the wayside and wake up one day when I'm 30 only to realise that I'm still living with my mother after all that time.

I guess I just want to know what others' experiences have been with moving out and what important items or costs are involved that may be easily forgotten or overlooked. Also, life hacks to save money while out of home will be most welcome. Basically any advice or input with regard to the subject of moving out of home would be appreciated.

Cheers.



jimmy m
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13 Nov 2018, 1:06 pm

If you move into a rental property (apartment/house) normally an initial deposit is required in addition to the rent. Sometimes that take the shape of a security deposit. It is money that is refundable back to you, when you move from the rental provided there is no damage to the structure.

Generally when you move into a rental you will sign a contract. Generally this contract terms are set on a year by year basis. You will commit to living there and paying rent for that time period (year). On the reciprocal side your landlord will not raise your rents during the term of the contract.

Remember to factor in the cost of utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, cable, etc.).

Many rentals are bare wall. This means that you need to obtain furnishings to make it habitable. It doesn't need to be fancy or new. I remember sleeping on a mattress on the floor for several years. So you can buy the basics and add to it as the years go by.

Some cost can be optional. For example you may not need a washer and dryer. Some apartments have a shared laundry room with pay washers and dryers. Or you might take your clothes to a cleaner or Laundromat.

It sounds like you don't drive. This means that location is very important because if you are going to work on a bicycle, you want to be somewhat close to work. That will limit your choice on available rentals to the going rate of the rentals in that specific region.


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The Grand Inquisitor
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14 Nov 2018, 4:48 am

jimmy m wrote:
If you move into a rental property (apartment/house) normally an initial deposit is required in addition to the rent. Sometimes that take the shape of a security deposit. It is money that is refundable back to you, when you move from the rental provided there is no damage to the structure.

Generally when you move into a rental you will sign a contract. Generally this contract terms are set on a year by year basis. You will commit to living there and paying rent for that time period (year). On the reciprocal side your landlord will not raise your rents during the term of the contract.

Remember to factor in the cost of utilities (electricity, heating, cooling, cable, etc.).

Many rentals are bare wall. This means that you need to obtain furnishings to make it habitable. It doesn't need to be fancy or new. I remember sleeping on a mattress on the floor for several years. So you can buy the basics and add to it as the years go by.

Some cost can be optional. For example you may not need a washer and dryer. Some apartments have a shared laundry room with pay washers and dryers. Or you might take your clothes to a cleaner or Laundromat.

It sounds like you don't drive. This means that location is very important because if you are going to work on a bicycle, you want to be somewhat close to work. That will limit your choice on available rentals to the going rate of the rentals in that specific region.

I've looked at houses in my local area and within the radius I'd be willing to move to and so yeah I'm aware of bond. I wouldnt move to be more than 3 or 4km from my work.

I'll definitely be doing up a budget of some kind before I move out, factoring in rent, utilities, internet, groceries and other expenses like haircuts, recreational costs and saving money. I'll also identify everything I will need (and want) to live on my own like a fridge, a microwave, a tv, a washing machine if there isn't one where I move to, maybe some tables and chairs, a vacuum cleaner I suppose but that's probably not as important initially, etc.

I've thought a bit about what moving out would entail. I just dont want to miss anything.



kraftiekortie
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14 Nov 2018, 11:17 am

You can get $200 per month rent? Or is that $200 a week?



The Grand Inquisitor
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14 Nov 2018, 6:25 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
You can get $200 per month rent? Or is that $200 a week?

Yeah I meant a week. I
Guess because a lot of other things are monthly bills I misspoke.



Prometheus18
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17 Nov 2018, 3:26 pm

Take furniture into account as well as food bills, electricity, gas, water and so forth. Your cooking abilities also need to be up to scratch (at least five or so fairly nutritious, filling meals). White furniture is sometimes included. Look into this.

Apart from that, you need to take into account facts about the neighborhood: is it safe, is it next to a busy main road where noise and pollution are going to bother you? How close is it to the nearest city? How close is it to your workplace? Etc etc etc.