Right translation of 'mit Bierflaschen anstoßen' ?

Page 1 of 1 [ 8 posts ] 

quite an extreme
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2018
Age: 321
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,320
Location: Germany

22 Nov 2018, 4:25 pm

I find only translation such as clink glasses but it seems quite wrong to me. How do English speaking people call it if they do it with beer bottles?



Deemar
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 16 Sep 2018
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 63
Location: Calgary, Alberta

22 Nov 2018, 4:30 pm

Cheers



quite an extreme
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2018
Age: 321
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,320
Location: Germany

22 Nov 2018, 5:09 pm

Deemar wrote:
Cheers

Yes to each other once you are doing it. But how do you call to do so? 'Clink bottles' seems a bit wrong to me.



stevens2010
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 7 Jun 2009
Age: 67
Gender: Male
Posts: 149

22 Nov 2018, 5:13 pm

quite an extreme wrote:
I find only translation such as clink glasses but it seems quite wrong to me. How do English speaking people call it if they do it with beer bottles?


In English, it's a part of what's called toasting, basically a mutual expression of solidarity about a shared event (in words) followed by touching wine glasses. However, this is mainly a reference to wine and wine glasses. Also, it is not necessary to touch the glasses; in some cases raising glasses above the level of your eyes is done.

Mit Bierflaschen Anstossen implies the same with beer bottles, which is more of an unspoken expression of solidarity, such as a bump of the fist (except, we're too lazy to put down the beer bottle...). This often is practiced in US "redneck" circles, in which the word "toast" would be absurd.



quite an extreme
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2018
Age: 321
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,320
Location: Germany

23 Nov 2018, 2:29 am

stevens2010 wrote:
Mit Bierflaschen Anstossen implies the same with beer bottles, which is more of an unspoken expression of solidarity, such as a bump of the fist (except, we're too lazy to put down the beer bottle...). This often is practiced in US "redneck" circles, in which the word "toast" would be absurd.


OK. Sounds to me like you are missing an expression like 'anstossen' (give a bump on) in opposite to 'raise glasses on ...' ('die Gläser erheben auf ...') because it's a quite common thing to do it. Germans call it 'anstossen' on something if doing it with glasses, mugs, cups, bottles aso. To 'bump the bottles' or glasses on something sounds not as bad I think.


_________________
I am as I am. :skull: :sunny: :wink: :sunny: :skull:
Life should be an adventure.


naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 23,443
Location: temperate zone

24 Nov 2018, 1:55 pm

I guess if you are writing a theme paper, or writing a letter to a person in an English speaking country you could just call it "toasting with beer bottles".

But yeah. I don't know of a specific expression that specifically means "toasting with beer bottles".

You could just say "lets drink to that" (whatever the cause is that youre drinking to).

You can "toast", or you can "clink glasses", or you can "raise a glass".

I suppose you could say "let's raise our bottles" and folks might get it.



3subjectnotebook
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 23 Jun 2013
Age: 31
Gender: Female
Posts: 241
Location: Germany

24 Nov 2018, 2:32 pm

Oh Yeah it's just called toasting or "let's have a toast" even with beers


_________________
The guardhouse sits just on the moons lap like a dying child.
She whispers in the greyest of grey voice. "hush my child, hear now this is the antithesis of the end".


quite an extreme
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2018
Age: 321
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,320
Location: Germany

24 Nov 2018, 3:22 pm

Thanks. I'll keep it as 'toasting with beer bottles' then.