The problem of cowering to and enabling SJW's

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ASPartOfMe
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25 Apr 2019, 2:46 pm

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Sports teams dump Kate Smith's 'God Bless America' because of her racist songs
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For years, baseball's New York Yankees and hockey's Philadelphia Flyers have played singer Kate Smith's famous rendition of "God Bless America" during games.

But those long-time traditions have been halted over allegations that other songs performed by Smith -- one of America's biggest singing stars during the early 20th century -- are racist.

Smith is closely tied to the NHL's Philadelphia Flyers because she performed "God Bless America" before Flyers games in the 1970s. A year after her 1986 death, the team erected a statue in her honor outside of its arena.

Now the team won't play her version of the song during games and will cover up her statue.

We have recently become aware that several songs performed by Kate Smith contain offensive lyrics that do not reflect our values as an organization," the Flyers said in a statement to CNN.

The Yankees said the team also was no longer playing Smith's iconic 1939 version of the song. It had been a fixture at games since the September 11, 2001, attacks, the team said. It got pulled three games into the season on April 1.

One of them is her 1931 rendition of "That's Why Darkies Were Born," which has lyrics that read:
"Someone had to pick the cotton,
Someone had to plant the corn,
Someone had to slave and be able to sing,
That's why darkies were born"
The other is her 1933 recording, "Pickaninny Heaven," which asks "colored children" living in an orphanage to dream about a magical place "great big watermelons."
In a statement, the Yankees said they had "been made aware of a recording that had been previously unknown to us and decided to immediately and carefully review this new information. The Yankees take social, racial and cultural insensitivities very seriously. And while no final conclusions have been made, we are erring on the side of sensitivity."
Her version of the song has been replaced with other versions.


The first song is seemingly outwardly racist but it should be noted it was recorded by noted civil rights activist Paul Robeson. The second one is based on stereotypes and none of them is “God Bless America” of which her version is arguably the most stirring. Kate Smith’s rendition of the song is part of hockey history, the Flyers won most games when the song was played as well as two Stanley Cups. If we are going to ban every song made by bigots or have done bad things we need to ban most songs.

The Flyers and Yankees are virtue signaling.

I watched this when it happened, very memorable.



Kids looked bored or pissed.


Just reading the lyrics the song looks racist as hell. Listening to the song I have a different view the tone is of pain. I can see why Paul Robeson recorded it.



Rotary Club drops Smith’s name on scholarship, at least for now
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Members of the Lake Placid Rotary Club had a lot to talk about this past weekend as Kate Smith's reputation was challenged over racist lyrics in a couple of songs she recorded in the early 1930s.

The question was posed, "Should the Rotary Club keep the name of its Kate Smith Scholarship Award?" The answer?

"For this year, we're just going to call it the Lake Placid Rotary Club Music Award and then go from there," said Rotary Club President Susan Friedmann

Since 1994, the Rotary Club has been giving out the scholarship to a deserving junior or senior at the Lake Placid High School interested in studying any form of music. It's traditionally been handed out around Smith's birthday, May 1. In 2018, then-junior Emma Bishop received a cash prize of $1,000 to be used for college applications or other college-related expenses.

"The last thing we want to do is to offend anybody, so we're actually in discussion as to what to do with regard to the name," Friedmann said. "We're not a political organization. ... We just want to stay safe and be part of the community and be well serving. Our motto is 'Service above self,' and that's what we want to do. We don't want to take any stands on anything."

Though originally from Virginia and Washington, D.C., Smith spent time in Lake Placid for about 35 years, including many summers at her Camp Sunshine on Buck Island in the village's namesake lake, where she turned the second floor of her boathouse into a recording studio. There is a memorial for her in the entry of St. Agnes Church, where she was baptized and confirmed as a Catholic in 1965, and to which she left a large bequest. She was inducted into the Lake Placid Hall of Fame. The Arts & Music Gallery at the Lake Placid-North Elba Historical Society features her records, sheet music and photos. She raised money for the Placid Memorial Hospital, the Uihlein Mercy Center and multiple youth programs. Her signature song, "When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain," is seen as a love letter to the Adirondacks. And finally, she was buried in a mausoleum at the St. Agnes Cemetery after she died in 1986 at the age of 79.


This woman raised $600,000,000 in war bonds and traveled 500,000 miles to entertain troops. Troops that were fighting for the United States not rebelling against it. This was in a successful effort to defeat not tiki torch carrying weekend warriors but actual Nazi Soldiers. In 1951 Josephine Baker a black singer was controversial because she refused to play to segregated audiences. She would shortly be banned from America for a time. This “racist” Kate Smith at probably some risk to her career booked her on her TV show. Kate Smith kept none of the profits from “God Bless America” they all went to the girl and boy scouts.

Let’s compare. What we have is WORDS from two songs and an advertisement verses the ACTIONS noted above. Lets be real. Most people under age 55 until this ruckus have probably never heard of Kate Smith. What they now know about her is she was some racist from another time that is being finally being called out and canceled. Now that is offensive.


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ASPartOfMe
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25 Apr 2019, 6:37 pm

Kate Smith called for racial tolerance in this forgotten 1945 radio address

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Kate Smith’s statue has been wrapped up and carted off from outside the Wells Fargo Center. Reaction to racist lyrics in two songs she sang — “That’s Why Darkies Were Born,” recorded in 1931, and “Pickaninny Heaven,” from a 1933 movie — silenced her rendition of “God Bless America” at Flyers and New York Yankees games.

Now it’s time to complicate the record further and consider Smith as a champion of racial tolerance.

In a long-forgotten radio speech in January 1945, “the First Lady of Radio” gave an impassioned speech attacking bigotry and racism, calling them “the diseases that eat away the fibers of peace.” As millions listened, she called for every church and family to commit to tolerance and understanding.

Which Smith is the real Smith? The purveyor of racial stereotypes or the crusader for social harmony?

“Are the songs racist? Of course they are,” says Susan J. Douglas, a professor of communication studies at the University of Michigan and author of Listening: Radio and the American Imagination. But in matters like this, where a moment from the past ignites a current debate, context matters, she says: "People don’t think about the historical context, and they don’t think about nuance at all. Without wishing to defend or advocate for Kate Smith, I’d point out that there’s a huge difference between the early 1930s and 1945.”

It’s hard to overstate Smith’s standing in her day. At her height, she was one of the most popular entertainers in America. She had a string of million-selling records and a series of national radio programs throughout the 1930s. As of January 1945, when she gave the speech on the CBS show We, the People, she had two weekly shows.

In this particular speech, she first told the story of a Christian family in Belgium that hid three Jews from the Nazis. And then this, as recounted in the May 1945 issue of the popular radio magazine Tune In:

"It seems to me that faith in the decency of human beings is what we must have more of, if there is to be a future for all of us in this world. We read in the papers every day about conferences on the best way to keep the peace. Well, I’m not an expert on foreign affairs — and I don’t pretend to know all the complex things that will have to be done for a lasting peace. But I am a human being — and I do know something about people. I know that our statesmen — our armies of occupation — our military strategists — may all fail if the peoples of the world don’t learn to understand and tolerate each other.
Race hatreds — social prejudices — religious bigotry — they are the diseases that eat away the fibers of peace. Unless they are exterminated it’s inevitable that we will have another war. And where are they going to be exterminated? At a conference table in Geneva? Not by a long shot. In your own city — your church — your children’s school — perhaps in your own home.
You and I must do it – every father and mother in the world, every teacher, everyone who can rightfully call himself a human being. Yes, it seems to me that the one thing the peoples of the world have got to learn if we are ever to have a lasting peace, is — tolerance. Of what use will it be if the lights go on again all over the world — if they don’t go on … in our hearts."

People heard it, all right. The sponsors of We, the People said they received more than 20,000 requests for reprints. Newspapers across the land reprinted passages.

Smith spoke as the Battle of the Bulge was raging; the anti-Nazi message is loud and clear. So is the fear that social division might weaken the nation in time of war. But the speech reaches further, to include “race hatreds” and “social prejudices.” The change she seeks is not by treaty but by a sincere change of hearts and minds.

Some might find it hard to square such full-throated social crusading with the two 1930s songs. “Pickaninny Heaven” — pickaninny is an offensive and, condescending term for a black child — imagines the afterworld as a place where “Great big watermelons roll around and get in your way.” “That’s Why Darkies Were Born,” tells us that “Someone had to pick the cotton, / Someone had to pick the corn, / Someone had to slave and be able to sing, / That’s why darkies were born.”

Douglas acknowledges the toxic lyrics, but says that by the mid-1940s, things had started changing. “The music Smith sang in the early 1930s derived from 1920s culture,” Douglas says, “and the 1920s was a very race-hostile environment, with a big resurgence of the KKK and worsening conditions for many blacks. But by 1945, you have increasing self-awareness in the country about our social divisions, increasing discussion, for example, about integrating the military,” which President Harry S. Truman eventually did in 1948. “Membership in the NAACP was rising, and you have black figures such as boxer Joe Louis, who became a national hero for defeating Hitler’s favorite boxer.”

As popular culture historian J. Fred McDonald writes in his online history of radio, Don’t Touch That Dial, throughout the 1940s a groundswell of public discussion denounced the mistreatment and misrepresentation of African Americans, including derogatory stereotypes in the media. Smith’s speech sits squarely in that movement.

Douglas wonders: “Why can’t it be the case that Kate Smith did sing those songs and yet had moved by 1945 to a new position, because of what was changing all around her?”


Lake Placid Rotary Club will keep Kate Smith's name on music award
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During their weekly meeting Thursday morning, April 25, at the Courtyard by Marriott hotel, members of the Rotary Club of Lake Placid decided to keep Kate Smith's name attached to their annual high school music scholarship.

"We are keeping things the way they are," club President Susan Friedmann said by phone Thursday evening.

On Monday, Friedmann told the Lake Placid News that members of the club had a lot of discussions this past weekend about keeping the name of the award intact as the late singer's reputation was being challenged over racist lyrics in a couple of songs she recorded in the early 1930s.

Maybe just maybe the SJW's will lose one for a change.


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Darmok
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01 May 2019, 8:29 am

So far, the university president has not caved. So far.

DePaul Students Demand Professor’s Censure, Call Him ‘Xenophobe’ For Supporting Israel In The Federalist

Campus administrators are trying to calm down students after a week of outrage over DePaul University professor Jason Hill writing in The Federalist to support Israel’s right to create defensible borders and repel Islamist attempts at genocide.

“Jason Hill, you can’t hide, we know you want genocide!” shouted students throwing papers over bannisters during a protest last week. The protesting students demanded that the university formally censure Hill, require him to take “racial sensitivity training,” and him to publicly apologize for writing that Israel has a “moral right” to annex the West Bank because it is territory it won during a war initiated by enemies who believe Israel and Israelis should be wiped from the earth.

Several student groups have denounced Hill’s praise for Jewish and Western civilization’s achievements as “racist, anti-Palestinian, xenophobic, sexist and Islamophobic,” characterizing his criticisms of Sharia law as “uncivilized,” “barbaric,” and “primitive.” More than 3,000 have signed an online petition denouncing him.


https://thefederalist.com/2019/04/30/de ... ederalist/


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01 May 2019, 8:49 am

there was recentley a bank add that was pulled because it made fun of dorchester.I forget exactley what it said but the bank appologized and took it down.it said something along the lines of if your bank card gets lost its likely in dorchester.implying that people in dorchester are criminals.dorchester is mainly black part of boston.

it was on the news a few months ago


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02 May 2019, 10:49 am

Every Pronoun Must Go

Two types of people desire to impose politically correct locutions on the rest of us: those who possess unlimited power and fear to lose it and those who aspire to unlimited power and need a means to attain it. And there is, after all, no greater power than that of prescribing what others must say and what others must not think.

The Scottish Maritime Museum, dedicated to the history of the country’s shipbuilding industry, has decided that it will no longer use the words she and her to refer to ships, but rather it and its. This is in response to feminists, who have defaced plaques referring to ships as she or her. This change would negate centuries of tradition, during which the words traditionally used on launching a ship, “May God bless all who sail in her,” carried no connotation of insult or deprecation—rather the reverse.

The Maritime Museum’s surrender is yet another instance of the craven surrender of British officialdom to the demands of a small but vociferous group of monomaniacs who make the imposition of their views the purpose of their lives. Museum authorities have argued that they must move with the times, and the prevention of vandalism is important, for economic reasons among others. Yet this rationale is something like awarding burglars a pension in an effort to prevent burglary.


https://www.city-journal.org/scottish-m ... neutrality


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25 May 2019, 5:50 pm

It's getting really hard to tell truth from satire these days.... :D

'This Is Exactly Like The Handmaid's Tale,' Declares Local Woman After Man Opens Door For Her

FAIRFAX, VA—Local woman Jenny Parsons was leaving a meeting, minding her own business, at the office building where she works Thursday. She thought she was just filing out like all the other employees.

Little did she know, she was actually about to encounter evidence that her workplace is no better than the oppressive, totalitarian regime depicted in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.

Her coworker, Jake, smiled and held the door for her, prompting Parsons to explode almost immediately into a rant about how this was just more evidence that America is literally like something out of a dystopian novel she's read about on the internet.

"Where are we, Gilead?" she said loudly as the confused man held the door for her. "Why does no one else but me see how oppressive this is toward women? This is exactly like The Handmaid's Tale. This is the future Hulu warned us about."


https://babylonbee.com/news/this-is-exa ... maids-tale


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SaveFerris
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25 May 2019, 6:33 pm

^ why did you leave the last paragraph off that article dude :lol:


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25 May 2019, 6:35 pm

Atwood -- kill me now 8O :eew:



Darmok
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25 May 2019, 8:56 pm

Satire or not satire? Who can tell. 8)

Image


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25 May 2019, 9:08 pm

Those ads give off a double meaning. The one about dreaming of a white Dorchester really says it all. Are all the other races supposed to leave Dorchester for the Christmas season?


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CockneyRebel
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25 May 2019, 9:25 pm

Darmok wrote:
Satire or not satire? Who can tell. 8)

Image


I started laughing right away when I saw that. :lol:


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ASPartOfMe
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13 Jun 2019, 3:17 am

Not this time

Protests at Oberlin labeled a bakery racist. Now the college will pay $11 million for libel.

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On Nov. 9, 2016, the day after Donald Trump clinched the presidency, a student at Oberlin College entered a local bakery and convenience store, hoping to leave with a few bottles of wine.

Instead, Jonathan Aladin, 19, ran from the store brawling with an employee, Allyn D. Gibson. The scuffle between the two men – the young black student, a sophomore at the time, and the white businessman – turned into a standoff between the liberal arts college and the downtown establishment, a proxy war in a much larger struggle over free speech, racial sensitivity and town-gown relations.

The skirmish came with a price tag for the college of $11 million, the sum awarded on Friday to the business by a jury in Lorain County, Ohio. The judgment, which found the college responsible for libel and infliction of emotional distress, provided a bookend to the bitter conflict, which has divided the Oberlin community, nestled 35 miles from Cleveland.

Gibson’s Bakery is a century-old, family-owned business whose fortunes are tightly bound to the college. The shop long supplied bagels and pastries to Oberlin, the town’s largest employer. Alumni return for the apple fritters and whole-wheat doughnuts.

The storied business sits adjacent to the campus, a bastion of liberal activism. Founded in 1833, Oberlin was the first interracial and coeducational college in the United States. The town was a stop on the Underground Railroad. Today, it is nearly 15 percent black, compared to 5 percent of Oberlin’s undergraduate population that identifies that way.

In recent years, the college has been an epicenter of the campus culture wars – a site of vehement debate over trigger warnings, safe spaces and the limitations of the Western canon. At Oberlin, no issue is too trivial for critique, not even the authenticity of Chinese cuisine served in the cafeteria.

In the fall of 2016, students were on high alert following the dismissal of an assistant professor of rhetoric and composition, Joy Karega, over incendiary statements on social media, including her suggestion that Israel was behind the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Karega, who is black, said she was a victim of discrimination. The college’s Black Student Union, assailing Oberlin as an “unethical institution,” had previously called for her tenure.

The confrontation between Gibson and Aladin led to the student’s arrest and arraignment on a robbery charge, which in turned spurred allegations of racial profiling, igniting protests that unfolded in the overwrought days following the 2016 election. Residents of Oberlin favored Hillary Clinton to Trump 11 to 1, while the surrounding county, where the case was later heard, came down on the side of the Democrat by scarcely more than 100 votes.

When Aladin arrived at the front of the store, Gibson, 32 at the time, told the student that he was contacting the police, saying he had seen him slip two bottles of wine under his clothes. When he pulled out his phone to take a picture, according to a police report, Aladin slapped it away, causing it to strike the Gibson’s face.

Gibson followed the student from the store, where they began exchanging blows across the street, which is campus property. Police said they arrived to find Gibson on his back, with Aladin, joined by two friends, punching and kicking him. All three were charged, Aladin with robbery and his friends with assault.

Students encouraged a boycott of the establishment, which is owned by Gibson’s father, David R. Gibson, and his grandfather, also named Allyn.

“A member of our community was assaulted by the owner of this establishment yesterday,” read a flier distributed outside the bakery, calling Gibson’s a “RACIST establishment with a LONG ACCOUNT of RACIAL PROFILING and DISCRIMINATION.” The leaflet recommended 10 rival businesses where patrons could go instead.

Police later conducted an investigation and found that 40 adults had been arrested for shoplifting at Gibson’s in a five-year period, among them six African Americans.

The college suspended its Gibson’s order in the days following the incident but restored it in early 2017. In August, the three students at the center of the tumult pleaded guilty to amended misdemeanor charges. Before their sentencing, which involved restitution but no jail time, each student read a statement acknowledging that Gibson was justified in trying to restrain Aladin, and that the owner’s actions had not been racially motivated, according to court documents.

Three months later, Gibson’s filed a civil complaint against Oberlin in the Lorain County Court of Common Pleas. Accusing the college of lending support to the protests, the Gibson family sued the institution, as well as its vice president and dean of students, Meredith Raimondo, for libel, slander, interference with business relationships, interference with contracts, deceptive trade practices, intentional infliction of emotional distress, negligent hiring and trespass.

The owners argued that college leaders facilitated the “illegal defamation and economic boycott” by helping students copy and distribute the fliers, as well as joining them at protest actions and allowing them to skip class and gain credit to continue their campaign. According to the complaint, a Facebook post by an Oberlin academic department stated, “Gibson’s has been bad for decades, their dislike of Black people is palpable. Their food is rotten and they profile Black students. NO MORE!”

“Gibson’s Bakery has suffered a severe and sustained loss of student, professor, administrative, and college department business,” the complaint argued. It also pointed to a “severe emotional and physical toll” on the family. Their home had been damaged, they claimed, and their car tires punctured.

The college responded by arguing that none of the statements cited by the bakery’s owners had been defamatory. Instead, they represented protected speech. Specifically, the filing maintained that the allegation of racism could not be grounds for a defamation claim because it was a statement of opinion that could not be proven false.

Lawyers further argued that Oberlin was not responsible for the views expressed by its students. Raimondo, in her response, said she was present at the protests to ensure they did not descend into violence.

Oberlin did acknowledge that some of its students viewed the bakery’s owners as racist. Lawyers for the college accused the Gibson family of adopting an “us versus them” mentality toward the campus community, citing posts on social media by the younger Gibson that took aim at “entitled” students. In a further response, the college denied allowing students to skip class in favor of their protest activity.

Jurors in Lorain County heard the case this spring. Communication unveiled in court filings and at trial revealed how different members of the college community reacted to the controversy. Some were apparently embarrassed by protest activity they felt reflected poorly on the campus, while others said the boycott had been effective in targeting Gibson’s with a “smear on their brand” since the business was unresponsive to other forms of pressure.

Raimondo took the stand and denied accounts that she had instructed college staff to engage in unruly behavior at the demonstrations. She said she lacked “control of the students.” Court documents revealed how she and another administrator shared a sense of outrage after a professor spoke against the boycott.

“[Expletive] him,” Raimondo wrote in a message, the Elyria Chronicle-Telegram reported. She added, “I’d say unleash the students if I wasn’t convinced this needs to be put behind us.”

The lawsuit ensured it wasn’t.

On Friday, jurors awarded Gibson’s and its owners $11 million. According to the Chronicle-Telegram, the court found that the college had libeled the bakery and its owners, in addition to inflicting emotional distress on the owners. It found that Raimondo was also responsible for libel, as well as for interfering with the bakery’s business.

The court assigned $5.8 million to Gibson’s father and $3 million to his grandfather, as well as $2.2 million to the bakery. The plaintiffs could gain more in punitive damages, which are the subject of the second phase of the trial, set to begin Tuesday.

In the episode’s aftermath, however, the college has aimed to mold the behavior of its students. Last year, Oberlin’s president, Carmen Twillie Ambar, wrote to the local business community about a set of new initiatives designed to teach incoming students how to be a “good neighbor” to local establishments.

The effort includes encouraging students to buy local goods and a new orientation program whose title makes its aim unambiguous: “Community 101.“


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Darmok
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13 Jun 2019, 1:55 pm

^ This was a very good verdict. Oberlin College officials were basically running a Ku Klux Klan-type operation of threats and intimidation, trying to destroy a local business.

The jury is today deliberating in the punitive damages phase. We shall see if there is any further award.


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13 Jun 2019, 2:54 pm

Darmok wrote:
^ This was a very good verdict. Oberlin College officials were basically running a Ku Klux Klan-type operation of threats and intimidation, trying to destroy a local business.

The jury is today deliberating in the punitive damages phase. We shall see if there is any further award.

Very good news for justice:

The jury just rendered its verdict on punitive damages in the Gibson’s Bakery v. Oberlin College case.

Daniel McGraw, our reporter in the courtroom, reports that in addition to the $11.2 million compensatory damages awarded last Friday, the jury awarded a total of $33 million in punitive damages, which will probably be reduced by the court to $22 million because of the state law cap at twice compensatory (it’s not an absolute cap, but probably will apply here). That brings the total damages to $33 million. We will have the breakdown soon. The jury also awarded attorney’s fees, to be determined by the judge.


https://legalinsurrection.com/2019/06/o ... kery-case/


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13 Jun 2019, 4:54 pm

Darmok wrote:
^ This was a very good verdict. Oberlin College officials were basically running a Ku Klux Klan-type operation of threats and intimidation, trying to destroy a local business.

The jury is today deliberating in the punitive damages phase. We shall see if there is any further award.


The courts can demand a settlement, but they can't insist that students ever give their patronage to the business again. In the long run justice likely will prevail. :wink:


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