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Hollywood_Guy
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06 Feb 2019, 3:59 pm

What do you think are areas of society where technological change is worsening or failing to improve relative equality or balance of some measures?

Bonus question: Do you think that one day people will ever stop migrating between cities because of technology?



Ollywog
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07 Feb 2019, 5:18 am

There is a book called Weapons of Math Destruction about how the use of computers to automate decision making can reinforce inequality. (That sort of automation is very common now in both business and government.) I have not read the book, so I cannot give you a summary, but it seems relevant to your question.


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Fnord
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07 Feb 2019, 9:57 am

Hollywood_Guy wrote:
What do you think are areas of society where technological change is worsening or failing to improve relative equality or balance of some measures?
Examples, please?
Hollywood_Guy wrote:
Bonus question: Do you think that one day people will ever stop migrating between cities because of technology?
No.



cberg
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07 Feb 2019, 9:59 am

That's called social media.


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07 Feb 2019, 10:00 am

There are very few Aspies on this forum that are OK with zero IRL friends or social contact.



cberg
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07 Feb 2019, 10:04 am

Facebook has nothing to do with that. Social media is basically identity theft minus the Visa card numbers.


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07 Feb 2019, 10:05 am

Ollywog wrote:
There is a book called Weapons of Math Destruction...


Weapons of Math Destruction
Public Bulletin


At New York's Kennedy airport today, a person later discovered to be a public school teacher, was arrested trying to board a flight while in possession of a ruler, a protractor, a drafting triangle, a compass, and a calculator.

During a press conference the Attorney General said he believed the man was a member of the notorious Al-Gebra movement and the FBI intends to charge him with transporting weapons of math destruction.

"Al-Gebra is a fearsum, transverse cult," the Attorney General said. "As a group they seek means of average solutions by extremes, and sometimes randomly go off on tangents in search of absolute values. A member of Al-Gebra may use acute alias such as 'x' or 'y' and refer to himself as an unknown identity, but we have determined that he is likely to belong to a common denominator - the axis of medieval that coordinates in every country." The Attorney General continued, "Al-Gebra functions as a bunch of standard deviations that have been tribal since the time of Noah's arc", a remark that struck a chord with the media. "They are inordinate in terrorism, of that I'm abscissaly sure."

He continued, "They use degrees of irrational subtrahend to create differences and conditional inequalities among friendly, discriminant nations, leading to arguments and making us less functional and coefficient in attaining our goals. And they have the international mobility of a swarm of loci. Give them an air matrix to inflate and a plot to set it on, and they can live anywhere. If necessary, we will pursue them to the corners of this Earthly sphere."

He complemented this with the supplementary remark, "As the Greek philanderer Isosceles once said, 'Never forget that there are three sides to every triangle, and sometimes two of them are normal'". The Attorney General added, "As you can tell, I am not diagonally opposed to that prime concept."

When asked to comment on the arrest, President Trump obtusely said, "If God had wanted us to have better weapons of math destruction, He would have given us more fingers and toes! Everybody knows this! Next to bisectual marriages and those polygonists in Utah, I'm concerned about the significant places of such weapons. Tomorrow I intend to go to the Hill and address Congruence about this situation. I have a volume of suggestions and a finite series of common solutions for them to consider."

The President also warned, "These weapons of math destruction are without parallel and have the potential to decimal everything on a scalene never before seen unless we become exponents of an infinity Higher Power and begin to factor-in random facts of kindness. If we enter a phase in which all nations are integrated in all degrees of purpose, that steady state will give us slope for a better tomorrow, and we will all be infinitely better off. In such a case we could have our pi and eat it too."

The President further declared, "I am gratified that we have been given a sine that Al-Gebra is protracting this situation with calculusing disregard. Their murky statisticians plan to inflict plane of new dimensions on every sphere of influence," he added. "Under these circumferences, we must differentiate their roots, make our points, draw our lines, and proportionally intersect these people throughout whatever area of the domain they range. And, above all, we must make sure that they can't get their hands on radii active materials. That is one thing you can secant you? What we need is a higher quotient of linguists embedded with our troops so that they can interpolate the gibberish that Al-Gebra uses to communicate. If we had that capability, we could periodically reach new limits of success as easily as falling off a natural log. Anything short of that could lead to some real, not imaginary, complex circumstances."

The Secretary of Homeland Security added, "As President Bush once said, 'Read my ellipse'. The one angle that I am uncertainty of is that although Al-Gebra will probability try to continuously multiply in theorem, their days are numbered as we draw the hypotenuse ever tighter around their necks."



Hollywood_Guy
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09 Feb 2019, 4:23 pm

Ollywog wrote:
There is a book called Weapons of Math Destruction about how the use of computers to automate decision making can reinforce inequality. (That sort of automation is very common now in both business and government.) I have not read the book, so I cannot give you a summary, but it seems relevant to your question.

For now, I meant talking about technologies that are with us currently or are just near becoming mainstream. Computers aren't really decision making for us yet (at least, not political or social decisions).



Ollywog
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09 Feb 2019, 6:31 pm

Hollywood_Guy wrote:
For now, I meant talking about technologies that are with us currently or are just near becoming mainstream. Computers aren't really decision making for us yet (at least, not political or social decisions).

The book is about the decisions that we are already delegate to computers and how the algorithms by which computers make those decisions can perpetuate or worsen inequality. These are decisions like who is eligible for a loan or which job applications will be considered.


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Enigmatic_Oddity
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15 Feb 2019, 5:29 pm

Everywhere? It's difficult to find a place in the world where that's not the case, and that's been the trend throughout human history.



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15 Feb 2019, 7:16 pm

The more technology, the more distance between the "haves" and "have nots"

There are many reasons why people move. Weather, jobs, family, friends, job, school, money. Different states have different political climates

Some jobs can be telecommuted. Some can't

Friends and family, you can interact with, with technology

But it is not as good as in person

So I seriously doubt people will stop moving because of technology

Or even move less often


No correlation, I predict



Hollywood_Guy
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15 Feb 2019, 8:08 pm

Not just economics, but the dating world also suffers from this in many ways.



Hollywood_Guy
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15 Feb 2019, 10:00 pm

I was also skimming that Quora website and someone answering a question over there had a comment about technology killing the arts. I agree with that even if I hate to admit it. Nowadays, everyone can make a cheap quality movie or song with the press of a button. I know people want to say that how great it is that so many "poor" people have access to those simple tools that weren't available two decades ago and to try looking "on the bright side", but I'm not as convinced.

Color me dark-sounding but I think this will only be accelerated as better technology becomes available at cheaper rates, and it the future doesn't appeal to me at all if I were honest. I think arts and creativity is losing value. I don't want to be like a neo-luddite, but I can't turn my eyes away from it sometimes.



redrobin62
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15 Feb 2019, 11:46 pm

I actually like how far technology has progressed. I have a relatively simple recording setup ($1K computer, $300 keyboard, $200 audio monitors, free software) which sets me free to record all the house, acid, trance, drum & bass or whatever dance tracks I can muster to my heart's content. It's also easier to get works out there, too. The only thing that's went up in price are the copyrights.



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01 Mar 2019, 6:24 pm

Ollywog wrote:
Hollywood_Guy wrote:
For now, I meant talking about technologies that are with us currently or are just near becoming mainstream. Computers aren't really decision making for us yet (at least, not political or social decisions).

The book is about the decisions that we are already delegate to computers and how the algorithms by which computers make those decisions can perpetuate or worsen inequality. These are decisions like who is eligible for a loan or which job applications will be considered.


Not really seeing the issue. Credit scores are hardly new and as for job applications I admit the filtering based on keywords thing is annoying but compared to random selection of resumes it makes more sense.


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