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StarTrekker
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14 Mar 2019, 9:40 pm

EzraS wrote:
I'm not privileged, just spoiled :P

The only accommodation I get that I know of is handicap parking. But I don't like using it.


Why don't you like using it? Do you drive?


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nick007
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15 Mar 2019, 12:33 am

About the only way I feel privileged by my disabilities are that I get money without having to work. I did work in the past thou I got on SSI before I started working & I get Social Security Disability now cuz I worked hard enough. I also have Medicare & Medicaid now that I'm on SSDI & they cover all the docs I see including regular dental checkups & cleanings. I also only pay $1.25 for prescriptions. I wouldn't really need most of the medical care & prescriptions if I wasn't disabled thou. I also pay alittle less than half the bus fair cuz I'm disabled but I'd be able to drive if I wasn't disabled thou I'd have to afford the expenses of owning a car.


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skibum
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15 Mar 2019, 11:13 am

I have not had time to read all the responses yet but to respond to the original post, I don't see it as privilege at all. Because of my disability it is impossible for me to make enough money to survive. If I can't get help I will not survive. I will literally die. So I see it more as making life a little more fair. And during the shutdown, my sister and her husband did not not get paid at all and had to continue working but they make enough so that they were able to get through it and they got all of their back pay once the government reopened. I just started getting SSI, still fighting for SSDI and even with SSI on top of my job income, I still cannot make ends meet. So I think it is only fair for disabled people to get breaks whenever we can.


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League_Girl
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15 Mar 2019, 11:27 am

skibum wrote:
I have not had time to read all the responses yet but to respond to the original post, I don't see it as privilege at all. Because of my disability it is impossible for me to make enough money to survive. If I can't get help I will not survive. I will literally die. So I see it more as making life a little more fair. And during the shutdown, my sister and her husband did not not get paid at all and had to continue working but they make enough so that they were able to get through it and they got all of their back pay once the government reopened. I just started getting SSI, still fighting for SSDI and even with SSI on top of my job income, I still cannot make ends meet. So I think it is only fair for disabled people to get breaks whenever we can.



Wait, how did they still work during a shutdown? Did they have other jobs?


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I have a quilt of labels. I had a language disorder and a speech disorder. Then communication disorder NOS. My other diagnoses have been Language Processing disorder, dyspraxia, SPD, OCD, ADD, Asperger’s, anxiety disorder, adjustment disorder, anorexia nervosa. My mom’s labels of me are: eating disorder, anorexia, social anxiety, PTSD, just being sensitive and having the victim complex when I was a kid. And of course she says I’m normal and says the only thing I had as a child was language. Huh? I must have been a shitty person then and maybe a difficult child I was who had to be labeled because of incompetent school staff and mean kids who didn’t accept differences and because I was trying to be “normal.” :/

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DanielW
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15 Mar 2019, 11:50 am

League_Girl wrote:

Wait, how did they still work during a shutdown? Did they have other jobs?


Government employees who were not furloughed still had to report to work and do their jobs. They were just forced to without pay until the shutdown ended. Some government workers received back pay. Some "Independent contractors" did not.



CockneyRebel
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15 Mar 2019, 12:50 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
You get the privilege of not being able to afford things most people enjoy and what you what little you can afford is of the lowest quality. You get the privilege of being heavily dependent on others and viewed with resentment and suspicion by people forced to pay for your benefits.


I was just going to say that.


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15 Mar 2019, 1:26 pm

The degree of disabled of a particular person might affect the way the way a person feels about receiving benefits, but not necessarily. It is basically a kind of subjective call based not only on a person's level of disability but also ones personality and how one has been conditioned to think/feel about himself. I do think there is a tendency in a lot of people for receiving certain kinds of benefits to affect their self esteem.

***About fairness, I think it would be helpful to get that straight, as many people are imo confused about this. Is it fair or not fair the way a person is born? Looking at it from this angle, that particular concept makes no sense.



Knofskia
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16 Mar 2019, 4:00 pm

I wish I could work. I find some work enjoyable; I love the repetition of the work itself and the added routine to my week; I like the access to more opportunities to practice socializing; work gives me added purpose and the feeling of contribution.

And you can earn more money, which helps to reduce stress about debt and bills; afford a better living situation in a safer area or with fewer roommates or neighbors; afford healthier and tastier food; afford better healthcare; and afford to do more of whatever reduces stress/makes you happy. So I really, REALLY wish I could work.

But I do not feel guilty or privileged to receive the small benefits I get. Besides the few benefits that it offers to those that manage to earn them, society is unintentionally set up to put us at further disadvantage than our disability alone does.


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League_Girl
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16 Mar 2019, 4:51 pm

I guess I am one of the some people who will feel privileged when they see what advantages they get to their disadvantage.


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I have a quilt of labels. I had a language disorder and a speech disorder. Then communication disorder NOS. My other diagnoses have been Language Processing disorder, dyspraxia, SPD, OCD, ADD, Asperger’s, anxiety disorder, adjustment disorder, anorexia nervosa. My mom’s labels of me are: eating disorder, anorexia, social anxiety, PTSD, just being sensitive and having the victim complex when I was a kid. And of course she says I’m normal and says the only thing I had as a child was language. Huh? I must have been a shitty person then and maybe a difficult child I was who had to be labeled because of incompetent school staff and mean kids who didn’t accept differences and because I was trying to be “normal.” :/

My blog: https://mynoneabdlthoughts.wordpress.com/


skibum
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16 Mar 2019, 10:08 pm

League_Girl wrote:
skibum wrote:
I have not had time to read all the responses yet but to respond to the original post, I don't see it as privilege at all. Because of my disability it is impossible for me to make enough money to survive. If I can't get help I will not survive. I will literally die. So I see it more as making life a little more fair. And during the shutdown, my sister and her husband did not not get paid at all and had to continue working but they make enough so that they were able to get through it and they got all of their back pay once the government reopened. I just started getting SSI, still fighting for SSDI and even with SSI on top of my job income, I still cannot make ends meet. So I think it is only fair for disabled people to get breaks whenever we can.



Wait, how did they still work during a shutdown? Did they have other jobs?

They both have government jobs. No other jobs. They were required to work their full time hours and meet all their quotas and deadlines for no pay. But once the government reopened they got their back pay that was due to them.


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