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Caz72
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14 Apr 2019, 5:13 pm

my youngest sister has a little girl that had a second birthday today and we went round for a little party
I dont see them much but my sister says the toddler is a 'chatterbox' normaly , so i was expecting to see a rather noisy cheeky little girl today but she seemed shy around adults
the only adults she not shy around are her parents and other aunt but when she saw me and my hubby come in she didnt wave or say hello she just ducked into her mums arms
she didnt make hardly any eye contact with me or my hubby and she doesnt respond to her name when her parents call her but she doesnt seem deaf ,

when my nt,)son was that age he wasnt shy at all and would pass his toys around the other adults in the room but i dont remember him respondig to name

but is it it normal for a toddler to be shy around adults they dont know very well and do all nt toddlers reply to their name?
also she repeats what her mum and dad say like sentences, echolalia ,is that normal for a child of 24months? my son only repeated one words which he grew out of at about 20 months

does being shy ,not responding to name and repeating sentences signs of autism or are they just normal traits in toddlers
I mean all toddlers are different they cant all be the same can they?


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magz
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15 Apr 2019, 2:58 am

Yes, a neurotypical toddler totally can behave like her. Nothing to worry about at this stage.
She could get overloaded by the party and all the new people, it would be perfectly normal for a 2yo.


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jimmy m
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15 Apr 2019, 9:04 am

I would say that it is very common for children to be close and open to their parents at that age (2 years old) and yet act very shy around strangers.

Children will also go through stages. When they are very young they may be very open and then for a few years become shy and then later become very outgoing again.

I wouldn't use it as a litmus tests at that age.



timf
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17 Apr 2019, 10:46 am

We raised two Asperger girls with selective mutism (a related anxiety complication also manifesting in shyness).

Bother daughters slowly were able to develop better social coping skills at around age 16.

Excessive shyness (like mutism) is mostly solved over time as the child can develop coping skills to manage and reduce anxiety.



Joe90
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17 Apr 2019, 12:05 pm

I understand why the OP would question this though. When you read about autism and young children, it almost implies that NT toddlers are extremely sociable, make eye contact with everybody and are always smiling and respond perfectly well to their name. Or it just makes it seem that way. In fact, the way I see it, all normal toddlers typically display some spectrum-like behaviours, even though they are not on the spectrum. This is why most toddlers that are on the high-functioning end of the spectrum don't get recognised so early in life, because the typical toddler behaviours they exhibit mask what might be due to their (unbeknownst) Asperger's symptoms. I've even read somewhere that it is quite common for NT toddlers to be worried by loud noises.


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kraftiekortie
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17 Apr 2019, 12:21 pm

Toddlers, in my observation, frequently do "autistic" things.



RightGalaxy
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17 Apr 2019, 8:55 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Toddlers, in my observation, frequently do "autistic" things.



I agree. That's probably why kids get reevaluated quite often especially when it comes to education.