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DeepHour
Veteran
Veteran

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Joined: 1 Jun 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 35,152
Location: United Kingdom

07 May 2019, 6:11 am

I have a love-hate relationship with Linux. I really struggle with the technicalities, and thus feel most comfortable with the more user-friendly distros, such as Mint, LXLE and MX.

Can't resist looking further afield though, and have come across some very interesting lesser known ones, in particular:

Knoppix: really designed for live usb use, huge number of applications, no idea what most of them are supposed to do, but a really attractively presented and fascinating OS all the same.

Kodachi: underwhelmed by other 'privacy' or 'security' distros (Tails, Parrot, Kali, etc), but this one blew me away with its range of applications and ease of use... :D

Antix: discovered this about four years ago, and keep coming back to it. The live options are particularly interesting, currently experimenting with dynamic root persistence.


Anyone else got one or two Linux 'hidden gems' to share?


_________________
On a mountain range
I'm Doctor Strange


SoloSailor
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

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Joined: 28 Sep 2015
Age: 55
Posts: 27

07 May 2019, 10:47 pm

The machine I'm posting with right now is running Sparkylinux- it easily handles all the usual desktop stuff without the unneccesary bloat of Ubuntu.
The nav computer on my boat is running Bodhi which reliably does everything that I need it to do while consuming much less power than other distros that I've tried.


_________________
Of all serious crimes under the law, smuggling...
least violates the consciences of men. It is a crime
against law and against government, but not against
morality. The smuggler robs no man. He buys goods
honestly in one market and sells them honestly in
another. His offense is against an arbitrary regulation
of government.... he simply fails to pay its demands.
Many men otherwise honest are unable to see any moral
turpitude in smuggling. ...government, in exacting toll,
plays the part of the highwayman.

-- The Oregonian, Jan. 21, 1886