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firemonkey
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20 Jun 2019, 4:03 pm

Should you say you have x when the evidence clearly shows you do, but due to circumstances beyond your control you've never been officially assessed and diagnosed as such?

In my case it's dyspraxia and learning difficulty.


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Exuvian
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20 Jun 2019, 8:32 pm

On the social side...
Personally, I don't want to say "I have x" if it wasn't diagnosed. For me, I think it's fine to say "I have indications typical of x", "x likely" or similar if I seem to be checking the boxes through self-assessment. Just my philosophy & situation, I won't say it's right or wrong.

On the legal/services side...
Unless you're committing information to a legal document, there's probably not any real prohibition against it. If it's a situation where it's not unlawful to claim and it gets you needed services, then it might be a good idea to say "I have x".



Persephone29
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20 Jun 2019, 9:15 pm

That's a good question.

I'd probably be more apt to claim it socially, if it ever came up. Like a friend asking sincere questions about why I do the things I do.

Where I live if you can't prove it medically, the professionals may act like they believe you when really they are just rolling their eyes behind the scenes. And they would never approve services without documentation. You'd think they were paying for it out of their own pockets as stingy as they are.


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Edna3362
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20 Jun 2019, 9:36 pm

I have... None, really. :|
Unless you count everything that chronic sinusitis could do that has messed me up so far, which is more of my problem than autism at all, then none.


I do think I have sleep problems more likely to do with restorative issues and breathing almost every night, than my neurology's lack of sensory filter and mental states.
And my sleep problem causes executive dysfunctions that rendered many of my workarounds useless and abilities impaired, that sometimes it could mimic ADD and any problems it could cause -- it worsens the autism's curse more than I could afford, making it the closest thing I have for an autism comorbid.

Thing is that my household currently can't afford a check up related to this, and I don't wanna bother them.


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IstominFan
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21 Jun 2019, 6:35 am

Anxiety is my worst one.



kraftiekortie
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21 Jun 2019, 8:53 am

I feel like I have:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder
ADHD--Inattentive Type
A generalized apraxia of body
Avoidant Personality Disorder

I've been officially diagnosed with:

Schizoid Personality Disorder



Olivia_H
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21 Jun 2019, 9:27 am

I have OCD and dyslexia.



Arganger
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21 Jun 2019, 9:51 am

Mine are in signature.
I'd say it's best to say such and such is strongly suspected.


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firemonkey
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21 Jun 2019, 10:03 am

Arganger wrote:
Mine are in signature.
I'd say it's best to say such and such is strongly suspected.


That makes sense. It's avoiding 'Only professionals can say' while very much indicating you are.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


shortfatbalduglyman
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21 Jun 2019, 9:05 pm

You don't need official diagnosis, unless for legal or medical reasons.

For example, government benefit


Sometimes psychologist misdiagnose

Autism , schizophrenia, schizoid personality disorders, nonverbal learning disability, overlap in symptoms



Mona Pereth
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22 Jun 2019, 1:59 am

ASD is the only neurological or psychiatric condition I've been diagnosed with so far.

I also have a history of sleep problems that have never been investigated by a doctor or psychologist. During the first four decades of my life, it often took me up to two hours to get to sleep, so I needed at least ten hours of bedrest each night in order to get at least eight hours of sleep. At around age 40, it became easier for me to get to sleep, but I seem to need more sleep than most people; I need nine hours each night on average.

I don't know whether I would qualify for a diagnosis of OCD. Probably not, I would guess. I do have OCD-like behaviors, e.g. double-checking whether I locked my door. But I think my OCD-like behaviors are mostly just a way of coping with being absent-minded, e.g. I double-check whether I locked my door because I'm in actual danger of having forgotten to lock it due to my absent-mindedness. So I think my actual problem is just absent-mindedness due to ASD-related hyperfocus on whatever was going through my head when I closed the door.

I do tend to be anxious, also mostly as a direct consequence of various ASD-related issues. But I'm not anxious all the time, and I'd be surprised if my anxiety were considered severe enough to qualify me for a diagnosis of anxiety disorder of any kind.

So I don't think I have any co-occurring neurological or psychiatric conditions other than maybe a sleep disorder of some kind.


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shortfatbalduglyman
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22 Jun 2019, 5:51 am

"you don't look autistic" is by far the most common response

Diagnosed autistic


So whatever



Some lil dipshits act like they are receptive but they are judgmental





Some educated, normal, nice precious lil "people" are homophobic






Catch 22




Usually disclosure won't make someone receptive

Sometimes disclosure makes them angry


But if they are receptive, disclosure is not necessary







Thus far, nobody that works in counseling doubted my diagnosis







:mrgreen: