Is it an ASD Thing to get lost even with directions?

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MissMary227
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10 Jul 2019, 11:16 pm

I have directions to someones' home, I plot it in my phone. It directs me right there, but for some reason the number I see on the house is the number I think I am looking for, but actually it's another number. I *think* I am paying attention to the house number, and I am trying to pay attention, but I end up knocking on the wrong door, thinking it's the right door. Then, I go next door, see the number, and think, "Oh, this is it!" Knock on that door, wrong again! The house I need is actually across the street. 8O

This also happens with making appts. I will space those out fairly frequently, even when I write them down.

Hiking in the woods I can get an almost OCD thought process going whereby even though I KNOW the trail, and been on it a hundred times, I will be afraid to deviate from it because of this irrational fear of getting lost.

Is this ASD or just common place stuff?



Edna3362
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10 Jul 2019, 11:31 pm

... It's mainly a bad spatial ability thing. :|



I have the opposite.
Other than being a wanderer and would rather have the skill to afford wandering off on my own, I can also track certain places with less clues that most people would have trouble getting into. I could be almost just as bad if I misinterpreted the directions, forgot about it altogether, or too overwhelmed/ill/distracted/drunk/low on EF/tired to make it right, and think or recall about it.


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MissMary227
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10 Jul 2019, 11:33 pm

Edna3362 wrote:
... It's mainly a bad spatial ability thing. :|



I have the opposite.
Other than being a wanderer and would rather have the skill to afford wandering off on my own, I can also track certain places with less clues that most people would have trouble getting into. I could be almost just as bad if I misinterpreted the directions, forgot about it altogether, or too overwhelmed/ill/distracted/drunk/low on EF/tired to make it right, and think or recall about it.



Not sure of your gender, but I know men are notoriously better at navigation than women.



Edna3362
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10 Jul 2019, 11:40 pm

MissMary227 wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
... It's mainly a bad spatial ability thing. :|



I have the opposite.
Other than being a wanderer and would rather have the skill to afford wandering off on my own, I can also track certain places with less clues that most people would have trouble getting into. I could be almost just as bad if I misinterpreted the directions, forgot about it altogether, or too overwhelmed/ill/distracted/drunk/low on EF/tired to make it right, and think or recall about it.



Not sure of your gender, but I know men are notoriously better at navigation than women.

Female here too. :skull:
I just happened to be an autistic whose ability profile leans more to performance IQ than verbal IQ.


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firemonkey
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11 Jul 2019, 12:33 am

https://www.gettinglost.ca/content.php


Cambridge face memory


In the Cambridge face memory test, you were required to memorize the faces of six different individuals, and subsequently identify these individuals from other faces that you had not memorized.

On the Cambridge face memory task, you scored 39 out of 72, with an average reaction time of 2.79 seconds. Your performance on this task indicates that you remember faces with difficulty.


Spatial Configuration Task Feedback


In this task, you were placed in a space-like virtual environment which was populated with five distinct, simple objects. For each trial of this task, you were asked to indicate which object you were looking from, based on your current viewpoint. To respond correctly, you would need to carefully track the objects you see as the camera moves, and hold in mind their positions when they are not in view. This test was designed to assess this ability of rapidly forming a mental representation of the positions and identities of objects in an environment.

On the spatial configuration task, you scored 17 out of 60, with an average reaction time of 3.56 seconds. Your performance on this task may indicate that you have difficulty or inability to rapidly form a mental representation of the locations of objects in a new environment.


Four Mountains Task Feedback


In each trial of this task, you were asked to view and memorize a scene, which had four distinct mountains in the foreground. After a brief delay, you were shown four scenes, and were asked to identifiy which scene had the same topography as the one you memorized. However, all the scenes provided as response options were viewed from a different position than the scene you memorized. Additionally, the colour of the ground and the position of the sun had changed. This required you to memorize the shape and relative positions of the four mountains in the forground to identify the correct response. This task was designed to assess your short-term visuo-spatial memory, as well as your ability to imagine a scene from a different perspective.

On the four mountains task, you scored 8 out of 20, with an average reaction time of 4.55 seconds. Your performance on this task may indicate that you have difficulty or inability to remember or manipulate scenes in your mind



Mental Rotation Task Feedback

In each trial of this task, you were asked to view a pair of objects made entirely from cubes. Each pair of objects was either the exact same object, or one was a mirror image of the other. To perform this task you would need to mentally rotate one of the two objects to be congruent with the other, and then compare if they are the same object or not. This task assesses your ability to mentally manipulate objects without an explicit demand to memorize the objects.

On the mental rotation task, you scored 43 out of 80, with an average reaction time of 2.25 seconds. Your performance on this task may indicate that you have difficulty or inability to mentally rotate objects.


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League_Girl
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11 Jul 2019, 1:11 am

Edna3362 wrote:
MissMary227 wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
... It's mainly a bad spatial ability thing. :|



I have the opposite.
Other than being a wanderer and would rather have the skill to afford wandering off on my own, I can also track certain places with less clues that most people would have trouble getting into. I could be almost just as bad if I misinterpreted the directions, forgot about it altogether, or too overwhelmed/ill/distracted/drunk/low on EF/tired to make it right, and think or recall about it.



Not sure of your gender, but I know men are notoriously better at navigation than women.

Female here too. :skull:
I just happened to be an autistic whose ability profile leans more to performance IQ than verbal IQ.


My performance is also high, average range. Maybe me being visual has to do with it.


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MissMary227
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11 Jul 2019, 6:27 am

firemonkey wrote:
https://www.gettinglost.ca/content.php


Cambridge face memory


In the Cambridge face memory test, you were required to memorize the faces of six different individuals, and subsequently identify these individuals from other faces that you had not memorized.

On the Cambridge face memory task, you scored 39 out of 72, with an average reaction time of 2.79 seconds. Your performance on this task indicates that you remember faces with difficulty.


Spatial Configuration Task Feedback


In this task, you were placed in a space-like virtual environment which was populated with five distinct, simple objects. For each trial of this task, you were asked to indicate which object you were looking from, based on your current viewpoint. To respond correctly, you would need to carefully track the objects you see as the camera moves, and hold in mind their positions when they are not in view. This test was designed to assess this ability of rapidly forming a mental representation of the positions and identities of objects in an environment.

On the spatial configuration task, you scored 17 out of 60, with an average reaction time of 3.56 seconds. Your performance on this task may indicate that you have difficulty or inability to rapidly form a mental representation of the locations of objects in a new environment.


Four Mountains Task Feedback


In each trial of this task, you were asked to view and memorize a scene, which had four distinct mountains in the foreground. After a brief delay, you were shown four scenes, and were asked to identifiy which scene had the same topography as the one you memorized. However, all the scenes provided as response options were viewed from a different position than the scene you memorized. Additionally, the colour of the ground and the position of the sun had changed. This required you to memorize the shape and relative positions of the four mountains in the forground to identify the correct response. This task was designed to assess your short-term visuo-spatial memory, as well as your ability to imagine a scene from a different perspective.

On the four mountains task, you scored 8 out of 20, with an average reaction time of 4.55 seconds. Your performance on this task may indicate that you have difficulty or inability to remember or manipulate scenes in your mind



Mental Rotation Task Feedback

In each trial of this task, you were asked to view a pair of objects made entirely from cubes. Each pair of objects was either the exact same object, or one was a mirror image of the other. To perform this task you would need to mentally rotate one of the two objects to be congruent with the other, and then compare if they are the same object or not. This task assesses your ability to mentally manipulate objects without an explicit demand to memorize the objects.

On the mental rotation task, you scored 43 out of 80, with an average reaction time of 2.25 seconds. Your performance on this task may indicate that you have difficulty or inability to mentally rotate objects.



Awesome! This is really helpful, thank you. I will check out the link and take the tests.

I guess I can maybe add Developmental Topographical Disorientation (DTD) to my list :lol:



MissMary227
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11 Jul 2019, 6:29 am

Edna3362 wrote:
MissMary227 wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
... It's mainly a bad spatial ability thing. :|



I have the opposite.
Other than being a wanderer and would rather have the skill to afford wandering off on my own, I can also track certain places with less clues that most people would have trouble getting into. I could be almost just as bad if I misinterpreted the directions, forgot about it altogether, or too overwhelmed/ill/distracted/drunk/low on EF/tired to make it right, and think or recall about it.



Not sure of your gender, but I know men are notoriously better at navigation than women.

Female here too. :skull:
I just happened to be an autistic whose ability profile leans more to performance IQ than verbal IQ.


Ahh. Okay.



IstominFan
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11 Jul 2019, 8:44 am

Directions can be confusing, and that annoying voice on the GPS device frustrates me even more. The instructions seem to be too circuitous and confusing with too much information, so I use a route with familiar landmarks and trim the fat out of the instructions as much as possible.



skiddlebugz
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11 Jul 2019, 2:44 pm

League_Girl wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
MissMary227 wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
... It's mainly a bad spatial ability thing. :|


I have the opposite.
Other than being a wanderer and would rather have the skill to afford wandering off on my own, I can also track certain places with less clues that most people would have trouble getting into. I could be almost just as bad if I misinterpreted the directions, forgot about it altogether, or too overwhelmed/ill/distracted/drunk/low on EF/tired to make it right, and think or recall about it.



Not sure of your gender, but I know men are notoriously better at navigation than women.

Female here too. :skull:
I just happened to be an autistic whose ability profile leans more to performance IQ than verbal IQ.


My performance is also high, average range. Maybe me being visual has to do with it.



For me as well, but I know directions, just not the street names. :oops:


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shortfatbalduglyman
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11 Jul 2019, 4:32 pm

Autism overlap with

Non verbal learning disability

Visual spatial processing



Zakatar
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11 Jul 2019, 4:38 pm

Not the case for me at all. I never get lost if I have directions and have a strong visual memory. Maps and traveling also happen to be among my special interests; I just recently finished my BA in geography and am currently traveling in Japan for the first time.


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madbutnotmad
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11 Jul 2019, 4:41 pm

many mobile phones can be loaded with apps that can give you directions to the door.
i think that there are even some glasses that use augmented reality that super impose
the directions in the form of graphics and audio over reality

I think that some of the problems with absorbing directions
can be related to short term memory and communication problems

can also be related to sensory issues if the directions are given in a environment that has a lot of sensory sources
that impairs the individuals ability to focus, due to being overwhelmed by all the other sensory information

cheers



madbutnotmad
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ASPartOfMe
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12 Jul 2019, 2:01 am

I have always had a very good sense of direction.

I can envision certain sensory issues causing bad sense of direction.


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