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Silver_Meteor
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31 Jul 2007, 11:14 pm

If you have Asperger's I would not bring it up at all. Asking if you have any weaknesses is a pretty broad question with a considerable amount of "wiggle room". You could relate any "weaknesses" towards needing more experience. Something that is truthful and verifiable but puts you in the best possible light with the interviewer. If it comes up later simply respond that I did not bring it up because I wanted to focus on the qualifications I was bringing to the position and that it was simply not relevant.



Arcona
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01 Aug 2007, 9:54 am

In the UK it is advisable to mention you have AS if you are applying for a job in the public sector. The public sector has an obligation to support disabled people and a disclosure of AS will not harm your employment prospects. In fact it might even increase the chance of getting a job because of quotas on employing disabled people.

It isn't advisable to mention you have AS for a job in the private sector unless the company specifically mentions it welcomes applications from disabled people.



boots1123
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01 Aug 2007, 5:09 pm

I don't reveal my AS to prospective or current employers.

When asked about weaknesses, I mention a trait that may be related to AS. One example is: "I may become too focused on one aspect of a project until it is completed. But, generally this doesn't happen, and I certainly don't mind input from other team members when that happens."
I've also mentioned that I do, at times, prefer to work in quieter settings, and will find one if the usual area is very noisy, cluttered, or crowded, when possible.

I agree that the "temp" to "perm" strategy can be a good one. I've met NTs that will only enter a company that way. They consider it their interview, to see if they like the "culture" of that company.



MysteryFan3
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01 Aug 2007, 5:42 pm

boots1123 wrote:
When asked about weaknesses, I mention a trait that may be related to AS. One example is: "I may become too focused on one aspect of a project until it is completed. But, generally this doesn't happen, and I certainly don't mind input from other team members when that happens."


That's what I give them, too. Great minds think alike. :D


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Scramjet
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02 Aug 2007, 5:49 am

Let me begin by seconding the notion that if a potential employer starts to "back out" as soon as you mention AS, it's best to get out of that workplace before you even get in there. If you "fake it NT" on your way in, you'll more or less have to waste mental effort keeping up that facade; effort that your employer and most likely yourself too rather saw go into the actual job at hand. Everybody looses, except perhaps for the odd "serial bullies" already on staff...

The frank truth about AS in the workplace is that the "average aspie" doesn't get along well with large teams/workgroups/etc., but has an amazing persistence and accuratesse with tasks that most NTs would find tedious and repetitive beyond boredom. Given enough general awareness about ASDs, those smart employers juliekitty was referring to, will realize that for some jobs Asperger's is by no means a "disability", but rather a kind of "right stuff", just as it takes people of another kind of "right stuff" to make astronauts and fighter pilots.



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02 Aug 2007, 9:11 am

Amen to that! I also think it is stupid and dishonest for employers to ask you what your weaknesses are. Anyone with sense is going to just talk about their strengths.


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08 Aug 2007, 5:49 pm

You need to give your employer fair warning, but if you use clinical terms (like Asperger Syndrome) you never know what they've already heard about it or whether they'll react rationally. So, when they ask about your greatest weakness, describe some of your Aspie behaviour without attributing it. Then, once you're hired, they can't claim you didn't mention it.

I did this with my current job. I told them I had no social skills in the interview. And they altered the job sufficiently that I no longer have to interact with clients or board members because they know it probably wouldn't turn out well, but the hard skills relating to the job (I'm a database manager) I do really well, so they keep me around.



Lessian
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25 Aug 2007, 3:51 am

Public sector and large private organisations are the worst for being negative about things like this. they are happy to hire a token black, asian, albino, cerebral palsy, wheelchair bound etc staff member so that they can say they believe in equal opportunity employment, but for things that involve the level of subtlety that AS does, they simply are unable to deal with.
anti discrimination laws are all well and good, but what company is going to be stupid enough to say they would not hire someone because of a disability, especially in todays 'tolerant' society? of course they are going to come up with a legitimate excuse to fire or not hire someone.
Regarding interview disclosure, unless you have a case worker who can intervene for you, do not say anything until after the job is yours. then wait and see what sort of people you are dealing with and how badly the job is likely to affect you.
It is much easier to fail an interview than it is to fire someone.


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star1215
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25 Aug 2007, 5:49 pm

Macgumerait wrote:
What would others do in this scenario? What response(s) do/did you get with telling them about your AS? Do you feel confessing your AS goes against you? Do you feel guilty if you decide to not comment on your AS at interview stage?


I've never brought it up, and I don't feel guilty. It doesn't affect my work for the most part and I don't feel it would be appropriate or helpful to mention it. If anything, I just come off as slightly shy and slow to warm up to people. I mimic really well, so that helps.



Lessian
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26 Aug 2007, 3:24 am

[quote="star1215"]I've never brought it up, and I don't feel guilty. It doesn't affect my work for the most part and I don't feel it would be appropriate or helpful to mention it. If anything, I just come off as slightly shy and slow to warm up to people. I mimic really well, so that helps.[/quote]

You are one of the lucky few, so make the most and enjoy it.


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JaredGTALover
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27 Sep 2017, 12:12 pm

along with your partner:keeping it hidden



shortfatbalduglyman
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27 Sep 2017, 1:48 pm

Boots 1123

"Noisy, cluttered, or crowded"?

That pretty much rules out all the jobs that I , as an autistic, qualify for

Restaurants

Customers make a lot of noise

And I do not have a lot of jobs skills either