Can Aspies Work in the Police Force?

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Teach51
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24 Sep 2019, 9:11 am

I have a young aspie student who is currently serving in the IDF in a non-combative capacity, and has his heart set on being a detective. My aspie lover is an officer (reserves) in a special unit of the Paratroopers in the IDF, but my student is a different kettle of fish, much more naive, badly coordinated, clumsy and slow in understanding instructions. Army service is mandatory in my country. My student actually did a shortened, voluntary service, then opted to serve a full three years to strengthen his chances of being accepted into the police, as is required of those with a high profile.
He envisions himself more as Sherlock Holmes than a detective from Law and Order, and he becomes acutely distressed if I ask him any questions relating to requirements and necessary skills for such a profession.

Does he have a chance? I saw a Tony Attwood (is that what that great aussie psychologist is called?) clip on YouTube when he talks about an aspie client who he helped get accepted to the police force in Australia but ultimately didn't like it.
I am building the lesson today around the requirements of the Israeli Police Academy, admissions and training, and have decided just to present information rather than compartmentalize him into cans and cannots. Who am I to bust his dreams? I teach him English and he is a brilliant student. He is already learning to drive and taking Krav Maga lessons. What could he study at college to aid a police profession? He emphatically states that only detective work will do. He has very poor computer skills also. As a soldier he is treated as a special needs recruit and does menial labour only. He is very very sweet and lovely. Opinions my dear friends? Is being super naive a real deal breaker? I suspect it is.


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Last edited by Teach51 on 24 Sep 2019, 9:23 am, edited 2 times in total.

kraftiekortie
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24 Sep 2019, 9:20 am

I always forget to put the extra "T" in myself. It's Tony Attwood. He's Australian.

I guess it depends on the country, state, or city.

I'm pretty sure an Asperger's/Autistic diagnosis (or any diagnosis of a neurological, developmental, or psychological nature) would, on the face of it, preclude somebody from becoming a member of the New York City Police Department----though waivers could probably be obtained.



kraftiekortie
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24 Sep 2019, 9:49 am

If I understand correctly, every Israeli citizen has to serve in the IDF for two years in some capacity.

Unless they have some sort of severe disability or illness.



Teach51
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24 Sep 2019, 10:03 am

Girls two years and boys three and reserve duty until 45yrs. The IDF recruits kids who volunteer, with Down's Syndrome, the visually impaired, kids on the spectrum, basically any disability bar mental illness, and helps to provide them with skills that will assist them in integrating into civilian life. The disabled are of course only in the army by choice.We are a tiny, close- knit country and being excluded from the IDF would really be a disadvantage when seeking a career. Today the kids who object to army service are exempt without punishment, they are very few, but it is an important asset on your resume if you have done full army service. For my student to complete three years voluntarily already shows tenacity, maturity, discipline, endurance and courage. It has to be in his favour, though it is not a very demanding job that he has.


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kraftiekortie
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24 Sep 2019, 10:11 am

If you were in the Armed Forces in the United States, and received a discharge other than "honorable," you are at a severe disadvantage in civilian life.

There is no disadvantage in having never served in the Armed Forces.



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24 Sep 2019, 10:17 am

I would imagine studying Critical Thinking would be a great skill.



Teach51
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24 Sep 2019, 10:45 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
If you were in the Armed Forces in the United States, and received a discharge other than "honorable," you are at a severe disadvantage in civilian life.

There is no disadvantage in having never served in the Armed Forces.


That's because it's a paid job in the US. We here are constantly at war so those who do not serve in the army are letting the side down. all our Nobel Prize winners, scientists, musicians, you name it, they have all been in the army.


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Teach51
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24 Sep 2019, 10:47 am

smudge wrote:
I would imagine studying Critical Thinking would be a great skill.

I'll find out if it's an available course here.tx smudge.


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24 Sep 2019, 11:33 am

I don't think aspergers would be a problem, but if he's clumsy and bad at taking instructions, that could be a problem.



kraftiekortie
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24 Sep 2019, 11:54 am

That's true. It is a "job" in the United States these days.



shortfatbalduglyman
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24 Sep 2019, 3:57 pm

The world contains a lot of aspies

The world contains a lot of cops

Venn diagram

Some cops are aspies

But you have to ask, can that particular student be a cop, in that city, in that year



CubsBullsBears
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24 Sep 2019, 11:09 pm

For about a year, I was in this program called police explorers(we'd meet bi-weekly on Wednesdays from 6-9 PM), where we practiced a lot of scenarios that cops would be in(trying to find a burglar in a house, felony stops, etc.)and everything we did took A LOT of critical thinking. There were countless times where I was called out for doing something wrong, and I felt really bad about myself for it. In April of this year, I quit.

Between that and watching a lot of crime shows, I'm sure there would be no way I'd be able to consistently make the right decision.

And this story is kind of not relevant to what's written above, but one night at 8:30 ish, everyone else was trying to find something to do for the last half hour. I got the vibe everybody was in "hangout" mode, so I went to the bathroom. After I got out of there, I saw another explorer member leave, so in my mind, that was the last straw with wondering whether the meeting was over. I went downstairs, texted my dad to come pick me up. When I was waiting, one of the lead people in the program called me and got pissy with me, telling me that it wasn't time to leave yet, and that the person that left had an excuse to leave early.

Even a year and a half later, I feel mad at her just from typing that.



Teach51
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25 Sep 2019, 5:05 am

So I'm guessing that the team co-operation and co-odination might be a big challenge for some aspies.


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25 Sep 2019, 5:31 am

I would imagine that in the police force there are a great many specialist jobs needed, so a great many skills. Only the police will know the typw of people they need. Is there some sort of short term job experience for a week or two so he can get the gist of what the work entails and the police can get to know his strengths? Here in the UK, if one has been outof work for a certain length of time they used to put one on a course where one is placed with an employer for both to have an idea about the job/person to see if they are compatable with each other. Unfortunately many employers exploited this so would only employ a brief few weeks after the course so they could get new grants for free employment... (Why I believe that eventually these schemes were stopped. In my nearest town it was such that almost have the workers were actually unemployed on training schemes where many had been given the sack on minor conditions to be forced back to work with the same employer on benefit wages and the employer had two years of free labour!

But the principle was a good one. The thought behind the plan was good. It was just a shame it was exploited and genuine jobs were replaced by training schemes.


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Empathy 11/80. AQ 39. May make sense to some. :)


Teach51
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25 Sep 2019, 6:11 am

There is a psycho-dynamic exam, a fitness test with a timed run and sit ups and stuff. There is a 2 day fitness aptitude test in teams. If he gets through that it will be surprising. I hope he does.


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