California passes bill, college athletes profit

Page 1 of 1 [ 5 posts ] 

Antrax
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,470
Location: west coast

01 Oct 2019, 10:44 pm

This is one of those times I'm really annoyed at the wrong planet title restrictions.

Anyways California passed a bill saying that the NCAA cannot restrict the ability of college athletes to profit off of their own name and likeness.

The players argument is that they are exploited, because they generate all the revenue for the schools of what is a massive enterprise.

The school's argument is that the rules are designed to maintain a (somewhat) level playing field between schools with more resources and schools with less resources.

Economically, the majority of college athletes receive far greater compensation than their value to the school in the form of a scholarship, training, and exposure. A few athletes are receiving dramatically less compensation than their value to the school. These athletes tend to go on to have pro careers. So I do not see this rule benefiting the majority of players, just a few super stars.


_________________
"Ignorance may be bliss, but knowledge is power."


pearlyspencer
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 17 Dec 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 20
Location: Near Monterey County, California

02 Oct 2019, 2:37 am

I Have seen a quite different statistic IIRC. It said that many, perhaps a majority, if full-scholarship college athletes live below the poverty level All athletes(I presume) - not just stars like " King James and Kareem, who have been the faceif this.



pearlyspencer
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 17 Dec 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 20
Location: Near Monterey County, California

02 Oct 2019, 2:39 am

I Have seen a quite different statistic IIRC. It said that many, perhaps a majority, if full-scholarship college athletes live below the poverty level All athletes(I presume) - not just stars like " King James and Kareem, who have been the faceif this. What is wrong with the headline restrictions here?



Antrax
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,470
Location: west coast

02 Oct 2019, 11:32 am

pearlyspencer wrote:
I Have seen a quite different statistic IIRC. It said that many, perhaps a majority, if full-scholarship college athletes live below the poverty level All athletes(I presume) - not just stars like " King James and Kareem, who have been the faceif this.


That's not what I mean. A full scholarship carries a value ~30,000-50,000 per year. The training and marketing on top of that are worth more. Only 3 sports in college gameplay actually generate revenue: football, basketball, and hockey. Those 3 fund the scholarships for not only themselves but all the other sports at a D1 university.

Of those sports only a few players actually generate added value to the team. Remove 3rd string offensive linemen from the team, and wins don't go down much. Remove star quarterback and wins go down 1-2 games minimum. College revenue is highly tied to wins of the team, since fans cheer for the schools not the players.

If you want to know the true market value of a player look at their other options. Collegiate basketball players can play in the G League ($35,000 per year), or China or Australian or European leagues. Collegiate baseball players can enter the draft right away or play in the Minors ($10,000 (AAA)-$1,100 (rookie) per month depending on the league). Many college stars (like Johnny Manziel) who can't hack it in the NFL play in the CFL (Average $50,000/year).

So yes, when I say the majority of scholarship athletes are overpaid by market standards that is accurate. Sports like music and acting is a discipline where the very top are very wealthy but everyone else tends to struggle to be above poverty.


_________________
"Ignorance may be bliss, but knowledge is power."


pearlyspencer
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 17 Dec 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 20
Location: Near Monterey County, California

02 Oct 2019, 6:09 pm

I disagree with your Ayn Rand-ism. So to speak.