Page 1 of 1 [ 7 posts ] 

jimmy m
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jun 2018
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,857
Location: Indiana

28 Oct 2019, 9:39 am

One of the attributes of many Aspies is that we like to work alone. I came across an article this morning that described jobs that only require minimal communication skills.

These are:
* Shipping, receiving and traffic clerks
* Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers
* Drivers, sales workers
* Medical equipment preparers
* Accountants and auditors
* Budget analyst
* Control and valve installers and repairers
* Industrial machinery mechanics
* Maintenance and repair workers
* Light truck and delivery service drivers

This is a link to the article if you want to dig any deeper.
Want to work alone? These jobs offer the most independence



shortfatbalduglyman
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 4 Mar 2017
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,054

28 Oct 2019, 7:48 pm

A lot of posters on wrong planet claim that they are bad at driving



Yakuzamonroe
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2017
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 237
Location: Edmonton

28 Oct 2019, 7:58 pm

jimmy m wrote:
One of the attributes of many Aspies is that we like to work alone. I came across an article this morning that described jobs that only require minimal communication skills.

These are:
* Shipping, receiving and traffic clerks
* Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers and weighers
* Drivers, sales workers
* Medical equipment preparers
* Accountants and auditors
* Budget analyst
* Control and valve installers and repairers
* Industrial machinery mechanics
* Maintenance and repair workers
* Light truck and delivery service drivers

This is a link to the article if you want to dig any deeper.
Want to work alone? These jobs offer the most independence


- Programmers, software engineers or IT
- Editors, writers
- Construction Workers to some extent



Dial1194
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 3 Jul 2019
Age: 119
Gender: Male
Posts: 127
Location: Australia

29 Oct 2019, 9:38 am

I've found it really depends a lot on the particular employer and workplace. A lot of jobs which can easily be done solo aren't always set up to allow that. As an example, I've done software testing (a great aspie job), which is basically hammering on a section of software to see if it can be broken in various ways. A section of testing can take anything from minutes to days to test, and there is absolutely no aspect of it which requires physically interacting with other people. Yet the setup I had to work in was an open office on a giant echo-y floor with over a hundred other muttering, keyboard-clicking, coffee-machine-running people who would constantly interrupt or decide to walk over and have impromptu loud meetings right behind my (hot-desked) chair. The culture of the employer was to have multiple meetings every day about things which were complete bullshit and accomplished nothing. It was a disaster - but that wasn't the fault of the underlying job itself.

The flip side might be another job I had - answering the phones for a corporate-internal technical helpdesk. While, yes, on the face of it the job entailed talking to people all day long, it was actually really great because all the conversations were almost formulaic (99.5% of the calls were about problems I knew how to fix, and the rest had a standard method of writing up a ticket for the next-level troubleshooters). I could sit under the headphones all day long and never have to speak to anyone else who was physically in the building. The desks were tucked away a little away from high-traffic areas, and it was supremely rare that anyone would actually tap me on the shoulder for anything. Almost all correspondence between management and workers was by email, and given that the union was making sure we were paid for every single thing management wanted us to do (including reading email, switching computers on in the morning, and attending meetings), the employer did tend to try and maximize our time on the phones and minimize things that weren't to do with getting work done.

The result was that I could walk in one minute before shift-start, sit down, put the headset on, run through formulaic troubleshooting for the whole day (apart from breaks), and at the end of the shift simply walk out and go home. Paid well, good perks, and I regularly topped both the quantity and quality charts, with next to zero forced social interaction.

(Interestingly, when I eventually got promoted to one of the higher-level troubleshooting teams, it wasn't as good because their workload was less constant, so there was more time where people would sit around and chat instead of doing something useful.)

So... yeah. While there may certainly be job types which look to be more aspie-friendly at first glance, or from reading the job ads or descriptions, don't always assume that this will be the case. Some initially-friendly stuff may actually be terrible in execution. Conversely, some horrible-looking jobs might actually be not half bad.



SharonB
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 806

29 Oct 2019, 12:15 pm

Tangent: I enjoy "parallel play". I am extroverted and love having folks around, albeit I don't want to interact with clients and large groups --- so I am the few Aspies that don't like to work alone. There is a company that did paired interactions which worked really well; even the high introverts enjoyed it (and all benefited). Albeit that was one company of millions. Point being: Company Culture is super important. In the "right" environment I could do a lot more than I can in the "wrong" environment. The list could be expanded...



AnonymousAnonymous
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Age: 29
Gender: Male
Posts: 54,803
Location: Portland, Oregon

29 Oct 2019, 3:34 pm

I can't drive at all (because of my epilepsy) so driving is out of the question for me.


_________________
Silly NTs, I have Aspergers, and having Aspergers is gr-r-reat!


DoniiMann
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 2 Sep 2010
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 314
Location: Tasmania

21 Nov 2019, 3:12 pm

Driving must be a thing for us. I do all the driving in my family because the only thing I hate more than driving is being in the front passenger seat. But I won't drive in the city without my wife as co-driver. Driving was even explored in one of the episodes of The Good Doctor.

So imagine my surprise when watching a mini series doco the other night on the romantic successes and failures of half a dozen or so Aspies, and one of the individuals is actually a bus driver.

One of my most successful jobs (three years) was in a noisy factory. But I was fortunate to get a ground floor station all to myself. Once I mastered it, I took over a neighbouring station. Eventually I took over the third station and ended up with the floor all to myself. It was a lot of work keeping up, but I was on my own, which I liked. I used to get really stressed trying to coordinate and share different machines with other people. When I finally had it all, there was no more conflict.

The noise of a busy factory is nothing compared to the noise of a cluttered brain that has to interact with others or fix their mistakes. The noise of a busy factory is easily ignored when everything else flows how you want it to.


_________________
assumption makes an 'ass' out of 'u' and 'mption'.