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fudgecreep
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09 Nov 2019, 1:28 am

Does anyone have any experience of doing mushrooms or truffles and their effects in their Asperger's/autism. I'm seriously considering trying some to see what they do, I'm aware that at work I'm not the most sociable and having some issues with work colleagues whom I want to get along with but with the way I am it's just not happening. I hear they make you more open and it's easier to talk to people.



jordanalmokdad
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09 Nov 2019, 4:50 am

any drugs, including psychedelic's, effect everyone differently. each persons drug experience is unique. my experience of them are a balance of positive and negative, good in the bad, light and dark. i've posted on wrongplanet before saying my drug abuse caused me psychosis, however i'd like to say here that i was tense, nervous and anxious before that, psychedelics just took control over it and the psychosis occurred much later after.

before my abuse of psychedelics, i was already an aware person. i was conscious of myself and i was not good at socialising. after taking psychedelics, i could temporarily open up. becoming aware of my light sensitivity and thinking about light and sensory input increased my light sensitivity and sensory input temporarily but then weeks later, i gradually taught myself how to filter out overwhelming sensory information in my mind, for the first time ever in my life, which is a definite milestone for me. as my sensory sensitivities decreased, i begun hearing external auditory voices and entered the dream world. the dream world, from my eyes, is perceiving the world in a dream like state, it was almost like everything around me was simulated, unusual, in a different 'light' than what reality actually is... you may have enough self control, internal dialog and awareness to prevent going into an abnormal state of mind and surroundings.

to recover from long term psychedelic effects, i have had to consider my intentions of why i should continue to self medicate and what i want my long term outcome to be... psychedelics had no place in them two considerations.

my drug experience will be different from yours.

one of my family members long term outcome regarding drug taking meant that she had to be required full time support from a nurse while my mum looked after her daughter.

another one of my family members used to smoke cannabis and got paranoid and used to hide in the closet when people knocked on his house.

another one of my family members took a lot of pills when his mum was dying and nearly commit suicide.

another one of my family members ended up in rehab due to drug taking and another smoked cannabis and had acute delusions.

another one of my old family members auntie, before she got divorced to my uncle, smokes a lot of cannabis. she is the happiest, quirkiest person i know.

its important for me to note that there is no telling weather the causes for my family members responses are causes by genetic factors. bad reactions and side effects seem to run in my family and compared to other families in our network, we are more complex.

if you put chemicals inside your body that alter your brains chemistry, there will be some sort of response.

a research conducting the effects of drugs claims that psilocybin mushrooms are the third safest drug, alcohol as the worst.

i've gathered on this forum that each one of us have a world within us that may not be able to be seen on the surface and sometimes not understood by others. this could be a factor of how possibly our long term experience on psychedelics may be different to, for example, extroverted 'mad lads'.



goatfish57
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09 Nov 2019, 7:36 am

When I was younger, I used weed as a social crutch. It did me no long term good.


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Rdos: ND 133/200, NT 75/200

Not Diagnosed, but have personality traits that are consistent with being neurodiverse. Confirmation bias may be an issue.


darkwaver
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09 Nov 2019, 12:37 pm

I've only had the opportunity to try mushrooms once, and I did feel like they helped. Positive effects were feeling relaxed, feeling more focused, cessation of repetitive thoughts, and relief from arthritis and back pain. The only negative effect was nausea. There were some visual distortions/hallucinations but they were not bothersome, and kind of interesting.

My wife tried some from the same batch, however, and had a completely different experience. She had racing thoughts, agitation, anxiety, and found the visual hallucinations scary and overwhelming. So it's true, everyone will react to drugs differently.



lostonearth35
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09 Nov 2019, 12:47 pm

I find it incredibly sad whenever anyone feels they need to start taking mind-altering drugs to temporarily solve any problem they might have. :(



timf
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11 Nov 2019, 10:34 am

About 50 years ago I used LSD, mescaline, mushrooms, and other drugs. It provided no resolution or help with anything. However, I was not looking for any help. It was like taking a trip to Cleveland. It can be fun the first time or two. But after a while, there is nothing exceptional about the trip and one finds other interests to occupy one's time.

I have seen people have "bad trips" that I suspect were the result of existing psychological problems that were either let loose or amplified by the drug experience.

I would be reluctant to recommend drug use to anyone today as I would be suspicious that what was available might have been adulterated or even toxic. I would not anticipate that Aspergers would make any difference to the drug experience. As the experience itself becomes less and less significant, I can see no compelling reason to risk ones health.



jordanalmokdad
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11 Nov 2019, 1:34 pm

darkwaver wrote:
I've only had the opportunity to try mushrooms once, and I did feel like they helped. Positive effects were feeling relaxed, feeling more focused, cessation of repetitive thoughts, and relief from arthritis and back pain. The only negative effect was nausea. There were some visual distortions/hallucinations but they were not bothersome, and kind of interesting.


i'd like to echo this in my own light. yes, at the time of taking the substance that i took, i very much enjoyed the complexity of the visuals that came along with it, being a visual thinker anyway and i enjoyed the feeling of relaxation and experienced no side effects until later on, if there was any side effects, i can generally throw things out of proportion without realising. the effect of the substance permanently removed 'the spot light' that i felt was constantly pointing at me in public places... i say the effect of the substance but in reality it was my own effort of realising that there is nothing actually to worry about and less pressure than i actually believed there to be/'the spot light'.

i'll never take the substance again however. these days i plant trees and do volunteer work and i don't need substances to absorb myself in visualisations in my mind, if i've always attained the ability to do so. i recommend anyone who has gone down the wrong path, substance wise, to find themselves a healthy distraction and someone close to talk to.

i've got no more input on the subject. everyone's experience in this life in general is unique and i'm not here to unravel the secrets and mysteries.



uncommondenominator
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11 Nov 2019, 3:50 pm

Anything can be detrimental if abused - mushrooms, cannabis, alcohol, coffee, food - too much done for the wrong reasons is bad with any of those. So how do you differentiate between use and abuse?

Something to consider... I've seen the sentiment "don't need drugs to be happy" a lot, here, and in general. And I always wonder if that also applies to someone who uses drugs like zoloft or abilify. They are most definitely drugs, that do alter brain chemistry, that are used explicitly to improve quality of life - in other words, to be happy. Would people tell someone who's life is made better by taking Lexapro that they shouldn't rely on drugs to be happy?

On the other hand, even things like Seroquel or Risperidal, while helpful to some, can be catastrophically bad, if not dangerous, to others. Same as any other substance, whether it's coffee or cannabis.

Having said that, using substances like cannabis or mushrooms *can* be useful, if used responsibly. For many people, the only downside to using these substances, is the stigma they carry. If you intend to give it a go, do your research, and plan ahead accordingly. Go slow and tread lightly. If you have any doubts or reservations, err on the side of caution.