Why is being a geek or nerd unattractive?

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kraftiekortie
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21 Nov 2019, 10:35 am

geek, n.



Pronunciation:

Brit. /ɡiːk/
,
U.S. /ɡik/

Forms: 18– geek, 19 geke (rare).

Frequency (in current use):

Origin: Of uncertain origin.

Etymology: Origin uncertain; perhaps originally a variant of geck n.1



GEEK


1. slang (chiefly U.S.).


a. originally English regional (northern). A person, a fellow, esp. one who is regarded as foolish, offensive, worthless, etc.

b. Frequently depreciative. An overly diligent, unsociable student; any unsociable person obsessively devoted to a particular pursuit (usually specified in a preceding attributive noun). Cf. nerd n.

c. spec. A person who is extremely devoted to and knowledgeable about computers or related technology.

2. U.S. slang. A performer at a carnival or circus whose show consists of bizarre or grotesque acts, such as biting the head off a live animal



Fnord
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21 Nov 2019, 11:01 am

Evidently, 'Geek' means the same things in both America and the U.K.


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kraftiekortie
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21 Nov 2019, 11:08 am

I know it does.

But I still wouldn't use the Merriam-Webster Dictionary as something which is absolutely authoritative. As a dictionary above all other dictionaries.

I would use it in the vast majority of cases as an authority----but I would leave open the possibility that there will be a definition, say, in the OED, which contradicts the Webster's notion.