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EzraS
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05 Dec 2019, 3:26 pm

The spelling.



dragonsanddemons
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05 Dec 2019, 5:27 pm

I was under the impression that the difference between Asperger's syndrome and HFA is that in Asperger's there is no speech delay while in HFA there is.

I find this discussion very interesting. When I was in elementary school, I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, but if I got re-assessed now, I would probably be diagnosed with level 2 autism, so it's kind of like I've crossed from one to the other.


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kraftiekortie
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05 Dec 2019, 5:28 pm

You can have high-functioning. classical autism without having Asperger's.



SharonB
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05 Dec 2019, 5:29 pm

CarlM wrote:
You know they are thinking Asperger's=Intelligent people with very mild autism.


Thank you for that clarification. An Autistic person can have all types of intelligence and person's of high intelligence can have all types of Autism (including none). If there is a correlation to the social "Asperger's construct", I wouldn't be surprised. After there is a disproportionate number of left-handed USA Presidents. Limited statistic: "Of the last 15 presidents, seven (about 47%) have been left-handed. That might not mean much until you consider that the global percentage of left-handed people is about 10%."


EzraS wrote:
The spelling.

Darn. I thought it was the number of letters, or the capitalization.



kraftiekortie
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05 Dec 2019, 5:31 pm

This is IN GENERAL:

A person with Aspergers tends to do well in the verbal realm, and not-so-good in the visual-coordination realm.

A person with classic high-functioning autism does well in the visual-coordination realm, and not-so-good in the verbal realm.



Joe90
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05 Dec 2019, 6:51 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
This is IN GENERAL:

A person with Aspergers tends to do well in the verbal realm, and not-so-good in the visual-coordination realm.

A person with classic high-functioning autism does well in the visual-coordination realm, and not-so-good in the verbal realm.


Yes this is rather a good explanation, although I'm not sure what visual-coordination means.
I've always been verbal ever since I was able to string words together (which was at the average age), and my mum says I made eye contact from birth and learnt to smile at 5 weeks.


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kraftiekortie
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05 Dec 2019, 6:54 pm

It means that people with high-functioning classic autism tend to be visual learners----and people with Asperger's tend to be more verbally-inclined in their learning.

I mean: "visuo-spatial." The ability to be coordinated in general.



dragonsanddemons
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05 Dec 2019, 8:38 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
This is IN GENERAL:

A person with Aspergers tends to do well in the verbal realm, and not-so-good in the visual-coordination realm.

A person with classic high-functioning autism does well in the visual-coordination realm, and not-so-good in the verbal realm.


By that, I'm HFA. I've never had trouble with being particularly clumsy or anything (I have some trouble because I'm rubbish at estimating distances, sizes, etc. but I attribute that to dyscalculia), but I have selective mutism and don't learn or remember things as well when they're only explained verbally (I learn best by example).


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SharonB
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06 Dec 2019, 12:11 am

Interesting. I was just diagnosed (ASD), so don't know what I would have been previously. According to my parents I passed all milestones on time (walked early). At 5 mos my mom noticed I was highly focused and could play for hours stacking rings which I did very well for my age. My point is that I talked on time and today am highly verbal - I like to talk (a lot), HOWEVER my internal experience is that it's hard to talk, it's hard to understand people (verbally). My visual processing is "very superior". So by the generalization kraftie shared my instinct is I'd be HFA (even though I talked on time and talk a lot). [some cliché about a lamppost goes here, which means a secret, but a feel like even with my diagnosis there are still secrets]



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06 Dec 2019, 5:32 am

carlos55 wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
Unless intellectually disabled should have been Aspergers because echolalia, hand flapping are repetitive behaviors. "Little Professor" is a stereotype, not the diagnostic criteria in the DSM IV
DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria for Asperger's Disorder


Thanks for the link interesting

So really from what you`ve posted its just intellectual disability & no speech (meaning none or very little speech at all at 2-3 years ) is the only thing that seperates the two?

Yes

dragonsanddemons wrote:
I was under the impression that the difference between Asperger's syndrome and HFA is that in Asperger's there is no speech delay while in HFA there is.

I find this discussion very interesting. When I was in elementary school, I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, but if I got re-assessed now, I would probably be diagnosed with level 2 autism, so it's kind of like I've crossed from one to the other.

High Functioning Autism is not a term in any diagnostic manual. It is autism without intellectual disability, it is only indirectly related to functioning in society.
Aspergers is a form of High Functioning Autism.

DSM 5 Diagnostic Criteria for 299.00 Autism Spectrum Disorder
Quote:
Note: Individuals with a well-established DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder, or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified should be given the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder


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firemonkey
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06 Dec 2019, 6:26 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
This is IN GENERAL:

A person with Aspergers tends to do well in the verbal realm, and not-so-good in the visual-coordination realm.

A person with classic high-functioning autism does well in the visual-coordination realm, and not-so-good in the verbal realm.


I'm much better verbally than non-verbally/(visuo-)spatially .


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06 Dec 2019, 7:41 am

Some call it a MILD for of autism (mild in the eyes of the beholder :roll: ) others describe it as a "between autistic and normal". Thar would probably be the best description, as it varies a lot from person to person. Some are great at masking difficulties and some are quite obvious. Some suffer more or less than others, but the point is, that there is a collection of very typical, common difficulties and traits - common enough to form a syndrome.
In my opinion ASD should be called ASC - Autism Spectrum Condition.


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carlos55
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06 Dec 2019, 8:54 am

Anyone got a link for the old dsm IV autism diagnostic list in the same format that AsPartOfMe posted the aspie one?

For comparison in the two

Or better still an official guide on distinguishing between them for assessors?



ASPartOfMe
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06 Dec 2019, 10:46 am

carlos55 wrote:
Anyone got a link for the old dsm IV autism diagnostic list in the same format that AsPartOfMe posted the aspie one?

For comparison in the two

Or better still an official guide on distinguishing between them for assessors?



DSM-IV Diagnostic Classifications
Quote:

Autistic Disorder (299.00 DSM-IV)
The central features of Autistic Disorder are the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication, and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. The manifestations of this disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. Autistic Disorder is sometimes referred to as Early Infantile Autism, Childhood Autism, or Kanner’s Autism (page 66).

A. A total of six (or more) items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1), and one each from (2) and (3):

Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction .
Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
A lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
Lack of social or emotional reciprocity
Qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:
Delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gestures or mime)
In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
Stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level


Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
Apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
Persistent preoccupation with parts of object

B. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:
Social interaction
Language as used in social communication
Symbolic or imaginative play

C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by Rett’s Disorder or Childhood Disintegrative Disorder.


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kraftiekortie
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06 Dec 2019, 11:04 am

What should be considered:

Until very recently, a person was considered to be "high-functioning" if the person had an IQ of 70 or above.