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BTDT
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02 Dec 2019, 11:37 am

https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p07w893g ... -the-past-
What lessons we can learn from the past?

This video brings up the concept of making stuff with your own hands.
Which may seem hard for uncoordinated Aspies, but I find that I can learn to do stuff if I stick with it.
Just because I don't pick it up easily doesn't mean I can't learn it with lots of practice.



kraftiekortie
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02 Dec 2019, 11:38 am

It takes me LOTS of practice, indeed.....

And lots of frustration.....but I can usually do all right after a while.



bhawk
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02 Dec 2019, 1:23 pm

ive always worked with my hands and built all sorts over the years, from aviaries, sheds, fencing, a house, etc. I also make knives, i do all my mechanical work on my car/bikes, i do all of the DIY etc.

I find no greater pleasure in working with my hands, it quietens my mind, which is always welcome. It also gives a sense of accomplishment, pride and the knowledge i have something custom built and of good quality.



firemonkey
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02 Dec 2019, 1:35 pm

With a lot of practice I could maybe get from 3-6% skilled with my hands.


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CarlM
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02 Dec 2019, 8:15 pm

I do lots with my hands and have always found it very therapeutic. My motor issues are very mild so that's not a problem. If I'm not using my hands, I'm hiking, running, biking. My aspie daughter is the same way.


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shortfatbalduglyman
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02 Dec 2019, 10:17 pm

Gross and fine motor coordination

Nonverbal learning disorder

Hand eye coordination



Borromeo
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02 Dec 2019, 10:48 pm

Handicrafts keep me sane--I'm partly joking but they also are a great outlet to the creative energies. I like to restore old antique things instead of buying new ones so that is good--also I try doing my own simple repairs on the car.

Hands-on living is a lot of fun and the ritual of it, I think, is good for people like us.



rowan_nichol
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03 Dec 2019, 4:00 am

I love it, and regret that I could not take "Craft" beyond the first form in secondary school.

I do love seeing the work of a real expert though, some of theold school electricains who can work surface cablin gin to a work of art, or make off a distribution board so neatly the board should have a transparent cover so their work can be admired.



BTDT
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03 Dec 2019, 12:30 pm

Yes,I loved doing crafts in school.



Dear_one
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03 Dec 2019, 12:36 pm

I just finished putting a new roof on my house, which involved special details that I had to invent and fabricate myself. I also fixed my pants, which ripped frequently. About ten years ago, I was very depressed. Half my house is workshop area, and I could barely walk through the clutter. I decided to take up art metalwork, a job I had really enjoyed, but not made a living at. At first, I was pretty clumsy, and had to learn to use worse eyesight, but I took the time to fix my mistakes and was happy with the results. That was the beginning of recovery.

When I don't have tools, I feel crippled. With them, I usually can fix anything from a kettle to a car, often starting with a free item. This really reduces my need for cash.

I don't envy kids today with their 3-D printers. It is important to get your hands on the material itself and feel it change. I did a lot of work in advanced composites because of what they can do, but I didn't like working all week on a tool, and then just using it to shape a soft mass that would then harden into usefulness.



Dear_one
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03 Dec 2019, 8:13 pm

Today was above freezing, so I was able to use glue on my storm door, probably for the last time until spring. I had some silicon seal left from the roof job that would have hardened over the winter, and some scrap styrofoam I had salvaged a decade ago. Now, my door is insulated, and I'll save a buck or so a year from now on. I feel a lot better than I do after a day of just fighting boredom. Now, I'm wondering how to make a durable, attractive surface on the foam, so I get to get creative again.

I always wanted a cast-iron table saw, and found one at a good price at a garage sale here. I had to finish some work the factory had neglected to make it accurate, and then improved it in many other details. The time is paying off in both time saved, and in satisfaction with the ease of quality work.

I have two rooms of tools now, but I have made a living with a kit weighing about five pounds - but only in one trade.