List of American English vs British English words

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kraftiekortie
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26 Dec 2019, 6:38 pm

Supposedly, it's the Brits who call corn "maize." I heard they now call it "corn," like we do.

I do know that "corn" meant "all grains" back in the 19th century in England----think "Corn Laws."



ASPartOfMe
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26 Dec 2019, 6:51 pm

smudge wrote:
Flashlight = Torch

Torch in America is a device flame comes out of used to light or burn something. What would that be called in the UK?


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naturalplastic
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26 Dec 2019, 6:54 pm

Corn originally meant "all grains". And it still means that in England. The Brits use the word "maize" for the grain introduced to Europeans by the American Indians.

In America the indigenous tribes showed the English settlers how to grow the stuff that they, the Indians, called "Maize". Ironically folks back in Britain call it by the Native American word, "Maize". But the settlers in America called it "Indian corn", and then just "corn" - thus Americans narrowed the word "corn" down to meaning just that one kind of grain. And ironically Americans virtually never use the American Indian word "maize" for the biggest crop in America which was first domesticated in North America.



kraftiekortie
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26 Dec 2019, 7:18 pm

I know my wife's son, who is a resident of SE London, calls corn "corn-on-a-cob."



smudge
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27 Dec 2019, 3:38 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I know my wife's son, who is a resident of SE London, calls corn "corn-on-a-cob."


It's a corn on the cob, not a. It's called that when it's still on the cob, otherwise we just call it sweetcorn, and never call it maize.



smudge
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02 Jan 2020, 11:42 am

Faucet = tap.



kraftiekortie
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02 Jan 2020, 11:43 am

In the South, the indoor faucet is sometimes called a "spigot." If it's an "outdoor faucet," it is called a "spigot" in all areas.

We call water from the faucet "tap water." So "tap" is in American English, too. Occasionally, "tap" is even used for "faucet." Especially in the sentence: "Could you get me some water from the tap?"

In bars in the US, beers are given to people "on tap," if it's not from a bottle. Where the beer originates is similar to a faucet---if not actually a faucet.



Last edited by kraftiekortie on 02 Jan 2020, 2:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

smudge
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02 Jan 2020, 11:54 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
smudge wrote:
Flashlight = Torch

Torch in America is a device flame comes out of used to light or burn something. What would that be called in the UK?
[youtube]Video[/youtube]


I'm pretty sure that's just what we call a blowtorch or a flamethrower. There's a difference between those two though. I think flamethrowers spray out a lot more fuel.

Lol at those uses for a blowtorch.



naturalplastic
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02 Jan 2020, 4:08 pm

A torch is just a burning stick held high to illuminate. That's what they used for portable illumination back in the days of old.

In the UK the just transferred the term "torch" to battery operated portable illuminating devices. What Americans call "flashlights". Makes sense.

A blow torch shoots a flame. And its called that on either side of the Atlantic apparently.

A military "flamethrower" actually shoots a stream of flaming liquid ( typically a mix of gasoline and oil) fhat can actually coat the target in flaming liquid. A lot more than shooting a flame at a target like a blow torch.



smudge
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02 Jan 2020, 4:26 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
A torch is just a burning stick held high to illuminate. That's what they used for portable illumination back in the days of old.

In the UK the just transferred the term "torch" to battery operated portable illuminating devices. What Americans call "flashlights". Makes sense.


I thought this might have been where it came from too.


naturalplastic wrote:
A blow torch shoots a flame. And its called that on either side of the Atlantic apparently.

A military "flamethrower" actually shoots a stream of flaming liquid ( typically a mix of gasoline and oil) fhat can actually coat the target in flaming liquid. A lot more than shooting a flame at a target like a blow torch.


They use blowtorches for small things like cooking.



jimmy m
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02 Jan 2020, 7:23 pm

I moved this from another thread.

smudge wrote:
Hmm, another to add to the American English vs. British English thread. Lol, in England we have another name for "knob".


Here is a link to an interesting article you may enjoy:
88 very British phrases that will confuse anybody who didn't grow up in the UK

For example: "Sod's law" - A British axiom that boils down to the idea that: "If anything can go wrong, then it definitely will go wrong."
"Sod's law" is often used to explain bad luck or freakish acts of misfortune. This is more commonly known in the US as "Murphy's law."


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03 Jan 2020, 11:43 pm

UK - US

Aeroplane - Airplane
Bonnet - Hood (for cars)
Boot - Trunk (for cars)


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Edna3362
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05 Jan 2020, 6:51 am

Not gonna list either terms because, well...


From my experience, Philippine English kinda uses both American and British English terms (not just the two), and is likely confused if not switching between the two. :lol:
Or make certain equivalent terms into something a bit more specific. On top of having it's own terms that confuses both American, British, or any main English speakers/readers.


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