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firemonkey
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29 May 2020, 1:44 am

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Synesthesia is a neurologic trait in which specific inducers, such as sounds, automatically elicit additional idiosyncratic percepts, such as color (thus“colored hearing”). One explanation for this trait—and the one tested here—is that synesthesia results from unusually weak pruning of cortical synaptic hyperconnectivity during early perceptual development. We tested the prediction from this hypothesis that synesthetes would be superior at making discriminations from nonnative categories that are normally weakened by experience-dependent pruning during a critical period early in development—namely, discrimination among nonnative pho-nemes (Hindi retroflex /d̪a/ and dental /ɖa/), among chimpanzee faces, and among inverted human faces. Like the superiority of 6-mo-old infants over older infants, the synesthetic groups were significantly better than control groups at making all the nonnative discriminations across five samples and three testing sites. The consistent superiority of the synesthetic groups in making discrim-inations that are normally eliminated during infancy suggests that residual cortical connectivity in synesthesia supports changes in perception that extend beyond the specific synesthetic percepts,consistent with the incomplete pruning hypothesis.


https://sci-hub.tw/10.1073/pnas.1914668117


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auntblabby
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29 May 2020, 1:48 am

so that means that folks on the spectrum tend to have higher rates of synaesthesia? i would love to have the form of it that lets me "hear" colors/textures and "see" sounds.



pyrrhicwren
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30 May 2020, 5:27 am

Thanks for the article!


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Jakki
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30 May 2020, 9:53 am

enjoying the article ........but there is a hiccup in my understanding of this , not having knowledge 1 st hand of synesthesia .


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IsabellaLinton
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30 May 2020, 11:24 am

I have many forms of synaesthesia. To be honest I didn't quite understand the testing procedure in the article, although I get the basic premise of incomplete pruning. I've given a lot of thought and analysis to my own synaesthesiac (sp?) phenomena. I can't remember not having those abilities, but the best way I can explain it is that my mind likely made connections or associations between stimuli at a very young age, and I wasn't able to forget or let them go. For example, I have always pictured the letter e as being blue. Always. I'm guessing that at some point in my very young life I saw an e printed in blue, and recognised it as being e. Then my mind never undid the connection. I don't consciously remember that happening, but I have a strong ability to associate two stimuli together, even today. It seems logical that this is how it started for me, but I don't know for sure.

I'll point out that synaesthesia isn't always as fun as people imagine. It heightens PTSD because I make connections between items that are innucuous or shouldn't be related. This can lead to fearing things I shouldn't fear, just by synaesthesia. I'm afraid of the colour orange because of an association to something unrelated via synaesthesia, and as a result I now fear the things that remind me of orange, even if they're totally unrelated to the original scary thing. It's a snowball effect like exponential growth. Nothing stands in isolation. It's certainly not easily when every letter or word or colour or sound or taste can possibly trigger an upsetting association or stimuli, which should be otherwise unrelated. There are people I can't like because of the "colour" of their name, or the "sound" of their scent. I can't undo it.

There's a good side and a bad side to synaesthesia, and the good is really fun. It's an excellent memory tool. Unfortunately, few people stop to consider that synaesthesia is very challenging for people with PTSD who experience upsetting, unrelated connections they can't unsee, unfeel, untaste, or unhear.



pyrrhicwren
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30 May 2020, 12:19 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
I have many forms of synaesthesia. To be honest I didn't quite understand the testing procedure in the article, although I get the basic premise of incomplete pruning. I've given a lot of thought and analysis to my own synaesthesiac (sp?) phenomena. I can't remember not having those abilities, but the best way I can explain it is that my mind likely made connections or associations between stimuli at a very young age, and I wasn't able to forget or let them go. For example, I have always pictured the letter e as being blue. Always. I'm guessing that at some point in my very young life I saw an e printed in blue, and recognised it as being e. Then my mind never undid the connection. I don't consciously remember that happening, but I have a strong ability to associate two stimuli together, even today. It seems logical that this is how it started for me, but I don't know for sure.

I'll point out that synaesthesia isn't always as fun as people imagine. It heightens PTSD because I make connections between items that are innucuous or shouldn't be related. This can lead to fearing things I shouldn't fear, just by synaesthesia. I'm afraid of the colour orange because of an association to something unrelated via synaesthesia, and as a result I now fear the things that remind me of orange, even if they're totally unrelated to the original scary thing. It's a snowball effect like exponential growth. Nothing stands in isolation. It's certainly not easily when every letter or word or colour or sound or taste can possibly trigger an upsetting association or stimuli, which should be otherwise unrelated. There are people I can't like because of the "colour" of their name, or the "sound" of their scent. I can't undo it.

There's a good side and a bad side to synaesthesia, and the good is really fun. It's an excellent memory tool. Unfortunately, few people stop to consider that synaesthesia is very challenging for people with PTSD who experience upsetting, unrelated connections they can't unsee, unfeel, untaste, or unhear.

^I enjoy the article but have to chew on some of it. Isabella is right as per usual. The interconnections are weird. I was in the hospital for a few months taking 2 opiates 4 times a day, fent..yl a few times. This screwed up part of my brain hard for months afterwards. I was getting phantom smells of things that don't exist yet they were a weird form of memories- for an example. To date, there are around 71 forms of synesthesia.

Forgot to mention too, with this whole memory thing, now I get a tic I never had before when I get a certain type of thought. It is weird.


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IsabellaLinton
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30 May 2020, 12:40 pm

Hugs pyrrichwren. I know what you mean, exactly.

Synaesthesia causes me to fear orange because of an associated trigger, even though they aren't related. Then I fear things that sound like orange, or feel like orange, or are associated with orange by some weird brain synapse. Then I fear the stimuli that those things trigger. None of it has anything to do with the original event, or the colour orange, and it's all unrelated except that my mind can't unpair them. I might end up afraid of a song because it connects to a smell that connects to a texture that connects to a voice that connects to a number or a mood that connects me to orange, and finally the original unpleasant thing that triggered orange in the first place.

That's just one example.

Ever heard the kids' song "There was an old lady who swallowed a fly" ? I was thinking about that the other day, and how it relates to the way my mind works. Everything is connected and related without rhyme or reason. Some people get angry at me for remembering details about them and assuming I'm obsessed. Um, no ... it's my mind recalling the colour of what you said which was triggered by seeing a letter S on a sign on the wall. Or, I remember because .... how could I forget a person with a green phone number and a red name saying something that tasted like marshmallows? The conversation will be green, red and white (Italian) in my memory, so if I look into my Italian-memory lexicon it will all come back to me.

Here's the song about connections. Yes, I'm a little weird but I can't help it. :P



pyrrhicwren
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31 May 2020, 7:32 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Hugs pyrrichwren. I know what you mean, exactly.

Synaesthesia causes me to fear orange because of an associated trigger, even though they aren't related. Then I fear things that sound like orange, or feel like orange, or are associated with orange by some weird brain synapse. Then I fear the stimuli that those things trigger. None of it has anything to do with the original event, or the colour orange, and it's all unrelated except that my mind can't unpair them. I might end up afraid of a song because it connects to a smell that connects to a texture that connects to a voice that connects to a number or a mood that connects me to orange, and finally the original unpleasant thing that triggered orange in the first place.

That's just one example.

Ever heard the kids' song "There was an old lady who swallowed a fly" ? I was thinking about that the other day, and how it relates to the way my mind works. Everything is connected and related without rhyme or reason. Some people get angry at me for remembering details about them and assuming I'm obsessed. Um, no ... it's my mind recalling the colour of what you said which was triggered by seeing a letter S on a sign on the wall. Or, I remember because .... how could I forget a person with a green phone number and a red name saying something that tasted like marshmallows? The conversation will be green, red and white (Italian) in my memory, so if I look into my Italian-memory lexicon it will all come back to me.

Yeah it is near impossible to make sense of it to anyone. I mentioned having emotional connection to rain and the moon (and trees) previously. I am not obsessed with any of my quirks it is just that way. I know the color fear thing; when I was younger it was the color red. No too much these days but the color still makes me feel weird. Some music/sounds give a certain sadness-emotion which I have never been able to describe. The one person that I told about this type of stuff made fun of ityears later so I keep it kinda low.

I've got 3 main types that I know of but could have more. I am completely burnt to a crisp. One day if I ever recover I'll dig into more forms to see if I have them.


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auntblabby
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31 May 2020, 8:03 am

pyrrhicwren wrote:
...Some music/sounds give a certain sadness-emotion which I have never been able to describe. The one person that I told about this type of stuff made fun of it years later so I keep it kinda low.

Stendahl's Syndrome. i have it also. some musics, i can't listen to in front of other people due to the mortification resulting from their seeing me reduced to a weeping puddle and having to explain myself to them. :oops: