Page 1 of 1 [ 5 posts ] 

chris1989
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

Joined: 2 Aug 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 378
Location: Kent, UK

26 Nov 2020, 7:26 pm

There are times when I do press-ups and use weights for exercise at home and watch something funny to make me laugh as I know that laughter boosts your immune system, but there are times during this pandemic, that I tend to over-worry and over-analyse things in my head and then I can't concentrate and it plays on my mind during the day and then will spend ages talking to parents about it for reassurance.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 72
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,826
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

27 Nov 2020, 2:57 am

Maybe spend some time listening to and comforting someone with nobody else to talk to.
More exercise usually leads to better sleep, and that leads to better moods.
Meditation is like an extra bath for the mind, needed to deal with all the "grime" of modern electronic stimulation and life in a major earth crisis. When you let go of worries to still the mind, you find a world of light.



StarTrekker
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Age: 28
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,086
Location: Starship Voyager, somewhere in the Delta quadrant

27 Nov 2020, 12:33 pm

This may be a little too "new-agey" for some, but I've been taught that we attract what we focus on, whether it's something we want, or something we don't want. If we focus all the time on the things we don't want or are worried about happening, those things tend to happen, but if we pay attention to the things we do want, we attract those instead. Maybe instead of worrying all the time, you can get into the practice of imagining the best case scenario of a situation. Have a plan for what to do if things go badly, but once you've made your plan, just let it be, and put your energy into focusing on what you'd really like the outcome to be.

This has worked really well for me in the past. The average wait time in my state for receiving government benefits is two years, but I didn't know that at the time when I was applying. I just kept thinking about what a relief it would be when they finally came through, and lo and behold, four months after my initial application, I was approved.

The same thing happened just recently with my service dog. I was put on a two to three year wait list to receive a dog, but because I kept focusing my energy on how great it would be if the dog came sooner, it was seven months after I finished the application that I received a call saying the program had a dog for me.

It's not easy, it takes a lot of practice and self-compassion not to beat yourself up every time you slip back into negative thinking, but I really believe that by focusing on the things you want, and the outcomes you want to see, you can "manifest" these things into being, and lead a more positive life as a result.


_________________
"Survival is insufficient" - Seven of Nine
Diagnosed with ASD level 1 on the 10th of April, 2014
Rediagnosed with ASD level 2 on the 4th of May, 2019
Thanks to Olympiadis for my fantastic avatar!


holymackerel
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2020
Gender: Male
Posts: 251

27 Nov 2020, 1:25 pm

If you have therapy services because of your autism, you could look into cognitive behavioural therapy. It tries to make you recognize when you are being pessimistic about something that is not justified.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 72
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,826
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

27 Nov 2020, 1:36 pm

One hazard that probably hits more aspies is "depressive realism." It turns out that a healthy mind is unreasonably optimistic, because whenever a chance opportunity arrives, the hesitant don't get a share. So, I don't recommend playing the lottery, but having hopes for something that is a bit of a long shot is fine as long as you can work towards it.