Page 3 of 3 [ 39 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,718
Location: Queens, NYC

08 Jan 2021, 2:30 pm

I'm not saying that at all.

I'm saying there is the tendency for females to exhibit less overt symptoms; hence, they are often overlooked within a classroom environment where there are disruptive children with ADHD and autism; these disruptive children tend to be boys (though, of course, there are disruptive girls as well). Disruptive children tend to be the ones who are assessed because it is felt that they need interventions for various reasons----one of which is to try to lessen the disruption of the particular class.

I don't believe there is "male" or "female" autism. I believe there is autism where, at times, females present differently than males; at other times, males and females present identically.



strings
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

Joined: 27 Jun 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 236
Location: Texas

08 Jan 2021, 2:43 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I'm not saying that at all.

I'm saying there is the tendency for females to exhibit less overt symptoms; hence, they are often overlooked within a classroom environment where there are disruptive children with ADHD and autism; these disruptive children tend to be boys (though, of course, there are disruptive girls as well). Disruptive children tend to be the ones who are assessed because it is felt that they need interventions for various reasons----one of which is to try to lessen the disruption of the particular class.

I don't believe there is "male" or "female" autism. I believe there is autism where, at times, females present differently than males; at other times, males and females present identically.


OK, sorry for misunderstanding. Just to be clear, you would say that if a male were to display exactly the same symptoms as "a female who presents differently from males," then that male would also meet the criteria for an autism diagnosis?



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,718
Location: Queens, NYC

08 Jan 2021, 2:50 pm

Nobody exhibits "exactly the same symptoms."

But if a male, theoretically, exhibits the exact same symptoms as the female, they would both have the condition which gives rise to the symptoms.

This is not all "black and white." You have females who present the theoretical "female presentation." Then you have females who exhibit the overt, classic symptoms of autism.



strings
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

Joined: 27 Jun 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 236
Location: Texas

08 Jan 2021, 3:08 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Nobody exhibits "exactly the same symptoms."


Yes, of course, and I agree with your point. I just wanted to consider a theoretical abstraction in order to understand a philosophical point.

So you are saying, I think, and I would probably agree with this, that there is no differentiation between female autism and male autism. It could be, though, that a diagnostician might perhaps have to probe different regions within the "parameter space of symptoms of autism" when analysing a female as opposed to a male. But ultimately, a given set of symptoms would either qualify for a diagnosis or not, independent of whether the subject was male or female.



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 75,718
Location: Queens, NYC

08 Jan 2021, 3:14 pm

That's right. Autism is a human condition, rather than a gender-based condition.



holymackerel
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 30 Aug 2020
Gender: Male
Posts: 251

08 Jan 2021, 5:06 pm

starkid wrote:
holymackerel wrote:
Has anyone actually bothered to check the ratio of level three autistics

Almost certainly not because the levels of support concept is relatively new. Some people haven't been diagnosed with a level of support.

Quote:
I hear a lot of people say women don't get diagnosed because of how the dsm is aimed at men and that women mask more frequently. I was just wondering if people have actually checked and it is not actually chromosome related. :shrug:

Checked what, exactly? Also, I've never heard of anyone blaming chromosomes for differences between men's and women's rates of diagnoses.


Maybe not, but they should cover all the bases right?



quite an extreme
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2018
Age: 321
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,909
Location: Germany

09 Jan 2021, 6:29 pm

One thing is that women are more likely socially accepted with it and have less social problems as long as they are still pretty attractive looking. Different genders are treated very differently regarding how they are expected to be.


_________________
I am as I am. :skull: :sunny: :wink: :sunny: :skull: Life has to be an adventure!