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threetoed snail
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14 Apr 2021, 4:03 pm

This seemed relevant to post here:



I remember I subscribed to his former channel ("Because Science") for a while, but got annoyed by the constant references to superhero/supervillain stuff and unsubscribed. Nothing against the guy though. Just not sure what to think of this video.



* May contain asterisk.


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carlos55
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15 Apr 2021, 8:40 am

At least he says he has the insight to recognise that others have different more severe symptoms, but otherwise good for him.



threetoed snail
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15 Apr 2021, 2:54 pm

carlos55 wrote:
At least he says he has the insight to recognise that others have different more severe symptoms, but otherwise good for him.

Yeah, the title feels a little too clickbaity, but I think all that he actually said in the video (and the way he said it) was pretty reasonable.

I just wonder now, he's not high-profile enough for any immediate generalized effect, but I think he actually is high-profile enough to trigger a larger chain-reaction trend (or maybe he's a reflection of some trend that's already happening). If it does turn into a trend, it will d/evolve into something stupid and profitably exploitable by less-than-scrupulous individuals at some point, because that's how trends go. So I wonder what shape that one might take.

That clickbait title itself (even if it is attached to reasonable content) feels like a sign of things to come.


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NaturalEntity
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15 Apr 2021, 3:10 pm

I don't consider my autism a superpower, but a part of who I am, even if it impedes me sometimes. And you're right. That clickbait title does not bode well for the future.


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aquafelix
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18 Apr 2021, 4:37 am

Whilst autism may be part disability, part gift (superpower). The proportion of those two varies tremendously between individuals



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30 Apr 2021, 7:30 pm

I strongly suspect that savant abilities -- or, at least, potential savant abilities -- are much more common than has been observed so far.

As I explained here, at around age 4 I figured out on my own how to play the piano by ear. But I could not have done this if there were not a piano in the house -- and my parents were very lucky to have that piano, which was a hand-me-down gift; they could not have afforded it on their own. Also my parents did a lot to help me develop mathematical skill. So I was very lucky, in crucial ways.

Many, probably most, autistic children are not nearly as lucky. So I figure there are probably a lot of autistic children who could have developed the same skills I did, but who didn't develop them due to lack of opportunity.

I believe that an absolutely crucial part of every autistic child's education -- including any and all early childhood therapy -- should be an attempt to recognize and develop the child's strengths and potential strengths, whatever those might turn out to be.

Alas, I'm under the very strong impression that ABA, for example, does not do this at all. Thus it is robbing autistic children of an opportunity to develop their areas of strength.

So I think the idea of autism as at least a potential "superpower" has valid uses, as a way to pressure the autism child therapy and special education establishments to change their ways.

But we need to be careful to do this in a way that doesn't undermine the human rights of the more severely disabled autistic people.


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30 Apr 2021, 9:17 pm

I'm not a parent so my first inclination is to stay out of the discussion, but I'm an Uncle and so I want to remind folk...

Mona Pereth wrote:
...that an absolutely crucial part of every autistic child's education-- including any and all early childhood therapy --should be an attempt to recognize and develop the child's strengths and potential strengths, whatever those might turn out to be...
Including, but not limited to, children on the Spectrum.


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Mona Pereth
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30 Apr 2021, 10:58 pm

Double Retired wrote:
I'm not a parent so my first inclination is to stay out of the discussion, but I'm an Uncle and so I want to remind folk...
Mona Pereth wrote:
...that an absolutely crucial part of every autistic child's education-- including any and all early childhood therapy --should be an attempt to recognize and develop the child's strengths and potential strengths, whatever those might turn out to be...
Including, but not limited to, children on the Spectrum.

Agreed that all early childhood education should do this, for all children.

But the means of delivery would be different. Autistic children these days get subjected to many hours of early-childhood therapy, in lieu of the kinds of pre-school experiences most kids would have. So we need to make sure that strengths-based skill development isn't neglected in the therapy autistic kids receive.

I would also argue that a focus on strengths-based skill development is even more important for autistic children than for other children (although of course it's important for other kids too), for two reasons: (1) autistic children need ways to compensate for their social disadvantages, and (2) autistic children (and other neurodivergent children) are likely to be much more idiosyncratic than NT's in how they learn; hence more attention need to be paid to figuring out how to teach them.


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