Does this beta blockers to work better?

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Jamesy
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19 May 2021, 7:55 am

Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?



Noca
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22 May 2021, 7:23 pm

Is healthy a noun now? I don't understand the question.


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Jamesy
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23 May 2021, 3:21 am

Noca wrote:
Is healthy a noun now? I don't understand the question.



I meant healthy weight



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23 May 2021, 11:35 pm

Apparently, they have very little effect on weight one way or the other.

Quote:
Can beta blockers cause weight gain?
Answer From Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D.
Yes. Weight gain can occur as a side effect of some beta blockers. The average weight gain is about 2.6 pounds (1.2 kilograms).

Weight gain is more likely with older beta blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin) and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol-XL). Newer beta blockers, such as carvedilol (Coreg), don't usually cause weight gain as a side effect. The good news is that weight gain tends to occur in the first few months after beginning the drug and then generally stops.

The beta blockers associated with weight gain usually aren't prescribed unless other medications haven't worked. Or, they may be prescribed if you have a specific heart condition that's helped by those medications.


https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-con ... q-20058385


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23 May 2021, 11:36 pm

Jamesy wrote:
Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?


What does the term "beta blockers" mean?



Noca
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25 May 2021, 7:13 pm

QFT wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?


What does the term "beta blockers" mean?

They are a class of blood pressure medication.


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25 May 2021, 11:34 pm

Noca wrote:
QFT wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?


What does the term "beta blockers" mean?

They are a class of blood pressure medication.


Do they mean beta cells? But if so, I thought the function of beta cells is to produce insulin. So blocking them would mean inducing diabetes? Why would anyone want to do it?



Eurythmic
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26 May 2021, 7:17 am

QFT wrote:
Noca wrote:
QFT wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?


What does the term "beta blockers" mean?

They are a class of blood pressure medication.


Do they mean beta cells? But if so, I thought the function of beta cells is to produce insulin. So blocking them would mean inducing diabetes? Why would anyone want to do it?


Different things. Beta cells in the pancreas are different and unrelated to how beta blocking medicines work.

Beta blocker medicines work on receptor sites for adrenaline and noradrenaline, they reduce the effects of these hormones.

Addit: I've never seen any evidence that beta blockers are useful in weight loss.



Jamesy
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26 May 2021, 7:46 am

Eurythmic wrote:
QFT wrote:
Noca wrote:
QFT wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?


What does the term "beta blockers" mean?

They are a class of blood pressure medication.


Do they mean beta cells? But if so, I thought the function of beta cells is to produce insulin. So blocking them would mean inducing diabetes? Why would anyone want to do it?


Different things. Beta cells in the pancreas are different and unrelated to how beta blocking medicines work.

Beta blocker medicines work on receptor sites for adrenaline and noradrenaline, they reduce the effects of these hormones.

Addit: I've never seen any evidence that beta blockers are useful in weight loss.




Well being a healthy weight is good for your heart which could make better blockers work better?



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26 May 2021, 8:04 am

Eurythmic wrote:
QFT wrote:
Noca wrote:
QFT wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
Do you think maintaining a healthy helps beta blockers to work better?


What does the term "beta blockers" mean?

They are a class of blood pressure medication.


Do they mean beta cells? But if so, I thought the function of beta cells is to produce insulin. So blocking them would mean inducing diabetes? Why would anyone want to do it?


Different things. Beta cells in the pancreas are different and unrelated to how beta blocking medicines work.

Beta blocker medicines work on receptor sites for adrenaline and noradrenaline, they reduce the effects of these hormones.

Addit: I've never seen any evidence that beta blockers are useful in weight loss.


Look at the wording. "Beta blockers" are blocking "beta". So what is the "beta" they are blocking? If its not "beta cells", what other "beta" is there?



Eurythmic
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28 May 2021, 10:59 am

QFT wrote:

Look at the wording. "Beta blockers" are blocking "beta". So what is the "beta" they are blocking? If its not "beta cells", what other "beta" is there?


Beta is a letter of the Greek alphabet and as such is used for many things.

Adrenergic receptors throughout the human body are broken up into Alpha and Beta (just think of them as being named A and B) with each receptor being broken up into several subtypes of each. "Beta blocking" medicines have many effects depending on which type of receptor is being targeted by the medicine, Beta 1, 2 or 3.

It's best thinking of them as a class of medicines which have a range of effects within the body. They are in no way related to the Beta cells that are within the pancreas.