Page 1 of 1 [ 9 posts ] 

Angnix
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Nov 2007
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,163
Location: Michigan

23 May 2021, 10:51 am

I came across a FB post about meltdowns and even just thinking about it almost triggered one!

I deescalated it and prevented a full blown one by taking a hot bath with my favorite soap (spearmint essential oil soap, I love the scent so much it calms me).

But if I get a job and while I'm working, what could I do? I read up on some articles suggesting things like fidget toys, etc...

Hmmm...


_________________
Crazy Bird Lady!! !
Also likes Pokemon

Avatar: Pikachu PhD... The ultimate Nerd Girl Pokemon!! !

FINALLY diagnosed with ASD 2/6/2020


IsabellaLinton
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Nov 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 40,304

23 May 2021, 11:39 am

- Know your sensory and emotional triggers
- Work with OT to recognise the physical sensation of stress, prior to meltdowns
- Work on your communication skills so you can self-advocate (to help avoid stress)
- Keep a sensory toolkit with you at all times
- Keep a private journal so you can vent to yourself
- Work with your therapist on coping strategies, or adjust meds
- Find a safe space at work where you can decompress
- Tell at least one person what to do if you have a meltdown
- Take mental health days away from work when / if needed / available



Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 20,814
Location: South-East England

23 May 2021, 12:31 pm

I've had a couple of meltdowns at work before, but it was the subject of COVID that triggered it. I went into panic mode and started freaking out, because a coworker I had been working with all week suddenly came down with COVID, and I thought I would inevitably catch it then give it to my (vulnerable) boyfriend. So I decided to get myself tested, just for peace of mind, but when I told the supervisor that I'd gotten tested and was waiting for the results, he yelled at me saying that I shouldn't come to work if I've had a COVID test. I thought I was doing the right thing by getting tested and I got angry with myself for opening my mouth, so I yelled back at him and slammed the door, then threw a newspaper across the room and cried. He told me not to "behave like a child" but then he sat with me and reassured me that everything's going to be OK, as he knew I was just frightened about the whole COVID thing.

I think us women can get away with having panic meltdowns at work more then guys, probably because it's more socially acceptable for us to show our emotions. It's just embarrassing, more than anything else.


_________________
Female
Aged 31
On antidepressants
Have ASD, ADHD and anxiety disorder
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


BeaArthur
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Aug 2015
Posts: 5,775

23 May 2021, 2:26 pm

Do people still do the "breathe into a paper bag" thing for anxiety attacks? I don't know, because I don't have them.

One thing you can do if you start to lose it at work is absent yourself for a few moments. Log off your workstation and go outside, for a smokeless "smoke" break. I mean get a little fresh air, walk around the building once, or sit in your car in the parking lot for the time it takes to play one or two songs on the radio. In most cases, depending on workplace rules, you need to tell your supervisor where you're going and why - but couched in NT terms. "I need a 5 minute mental health break, I'll be right outside the front door," something like that.

There's always crying in the restroom. I'm sure most of us have done that from time to time.

As you get more comfortable in your workplace, you can talk things over with your supervisor just to get them off your chest. For instance, you might have a rude customer you have to deal with. Most bosses understand these things exist and may have even experienced them too. It's much more acceptable to talk it over with your supervisor than to bottle up your feelings. But it shouldn't be a daily occurrence, because their time is valuable to them and that could be seen as too dependent or demanding of their time.


_________________
A finger in every pie.


illneverbeold
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 31 Oct 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 19
Location: Florida, USA

26 May 2021, 9:53 am

I've had pleanty of melt downs at work. I have been extremely fortunate to not be fired because of one or two of them. Generally I go to my car or go for a walk when I feel it all building up to an unmanageable level.


Angnix wrote:
I came across a FB post about meltdowns and even just thinking about it almost triggered one!

I deescalated it and prevented a full blown one by taking a hot bath with my favorite soap (spearmint essential oil soap, I love the scent so much it calms me).

But if I get a job and while I'm working, what could I do? I read up on some articles suggesting things like fidget toys, etc...

Hmmm...



Lady Strange
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 21 May 2021
Age: 37
Gender: Female
Posts: 66
Location: USA

31 May 2021, 7:46 pm

I tend to manage to hold it in till I get out to the car and poor husband helps me through the meltdown. Just learned this year what that was. Trying to keep a good home environment if at all possible can help (making it a "safer" place by keeping the environment as low stress as possible). I honestly often cope by coming home from work and basically hiding for awhile in our bedroom to escape and de-stress. By having less stress in other areas of life can help it not get as easily triggered elsewhere like at work sometimes.

Like another poster said too, there is the bathroom at work. Can go and try to calm down and manage. Its hard. Heck I've come real close to losing it multiple times in front of everyone. Another trick if you feel like crying is imminent, pretend your choking on your own spit or on water, or just claim its allergies till you can make a break for the bathroom!


_________________
Figured out in summer of 2020 about 99 percent sure that I have autism (with lots of research and help of my husband and doctor). Cannot get official diagnosis yet (can't find anyone to diagnose adults).


illneverbeold
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 31 Oct 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 19
Location: Florida, USA

02 Jun 2021, 6:47 am

I also find ensuring my home environment is harmonious and calming is a big part in handling stress!


Lady Strange wrote:
I tend to manage to hold it in till I get out to the car and poor husband helps me through the meltdown. Just learned this year what that was. Trying to keep a good home environment if at all possible can help (making it a "safer" place by keeping the environment as low stress as possible). I honestly often cope by coming home from work and basically hiding for awhile in our bedroom to escape and de-stress. By having less stress in other areas of life can help it not get as easily triggered elsewhere like at work sometimes.

Like another poster said too, there is the bathroom at work. Can go and try to calm down and manage. Its hard. Heck I've come real close to losing it multiple times in front of everyone. Another trick if you feel like crying is imminent, pretend your choking on your own spit or on water, or just claim its allergies till you can make a break for the bathroom!



King Kat 1
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 14 Aug 2020
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 184
Location: NW Ohio

09 Jun 2021, 12:31 pm

I'm still haunted by an awful one I had years ago, December 12, 2012. I'm shocked I wasn't sacked. People who have worked there awhile still remember. My meltdowns have been becoming more frequent, I want to quit the f'ing job so bad but can't seem to get the courage to.


_________________
Strange is your language and I have no decoder, why don't you make your intentions clear?- Peter Gabriel


illneverbeold
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 31 Oct 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 19
Location: Florida, USA

09 Jun 2021, 1:54 pm

If it is so miserable, maybe you can start looking for a better option. I have found another job before and when Ihave the final thumbs up I turn in my notice in writing so as to not burn any bridges in the process.


King Kat 1 wrote:
I'm still haunted by an awful one I had years ago, December 12, 2012. I'm shocked I wasn't sacked. People who have worked there awhile still remember. My meltdowns have been becoming more frequent, I want to quit the f'ing job so bad but can't seem to get the courage to.