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Technic1
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24 May 2021, 11:55 am

What (apart from the DSM 5) is the difference between Aspergers and Autism?



kraftiekortie
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24 May 2021, 12:42 pm

You already asked this same exact question.



Technic1
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24 May 2021, 12:44 pm

No, I asked what was Aspergers in the DSM?

If I asked the same question please link it as I would like to read it?



Last edited by Technic1 on 24 May 2021, 1:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kraftiekortie
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24 May 2021, 1:10 pm

You made a thread "Aspergers vs Autism."

The answer: Aspergers, according to the DSM IV, and colloquially, is a member of the "autistic spectrum."

In other words, Aspergers is one type of autism. There is no "difference" between Aspergers and autism.



Technic1
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24 May 2021, 1:28 pm

Maybe it the same but what differences do you see between Aspergers and Autistic people?

NOT from the DSM 5 (or 4)



kraftiekortie
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24 May 2021, 1:40 pm

You probably mean the difference between people with Asperger's and people with "classic, Kanner-type" autism. Both are forms of autism.



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24 May 2021, 5:27 pm

I have not seen anything that point to a difference that could be seen between someone that might has an AS diagnosis and others on the autism spectrum with similar abilities. Now the classic autism diagnosis refers to a subset of people with autism where the impact of autism is sever. But that is an extreme.



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24 May 2021, 6:12 pm

Asperger's seems to be the "mild version" of autism. Some people diagnosed with Asperger's don't always feel like they fit in to the autism phenotype but still exhibit social awkwardness, anxiety and other symptoms like that. These days Asperger's should be BAP (broad autism phenotype).

I feel like I have BAP. I don't feel 'autistic' and I don't like being lumped together with autism.
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24 May 2021, 6:14 pm

Diagnostically they do not have any differences. ASD is ASD. Asperger's doesn't really exist, and the reason (from what I have read, having done some research to kinda discover more about myself in my process) is because the only real difference between "Asperger's" and "Classical Autism" in the DSM-IV was only regarding one minor detail. And that "detail" was not really clearly defined: People with Asperger's did not always possess that qualifier when their diagnosis indicated they should have it, and some people with Classical Autism sometimes had that qualifier when their diagnosis did not indicate that they should.

And vice versa.

So basically the difference between Asperger's and Autism was redundant, so they got rid of it.

There are plenty of people who you might assume had Asperger's who were actually classified as normal Autism before the DSM-V shift, and plenty of people whom you might assume just had Autism but were actually diagnosed with Asperger's.

The point here is that the statement holds true: If you have met one person with Autism, you have met one person with Autism.

No two Autism people are alike enough to say "This is absolutely what Autism looks like, while the other kind isn't really Autism, it is something else!"

It is considered a spectrum now for a reason.



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24 May 2021, 6:15 pm

You can have "classic autism," and be high-functioning.

You have many of the "classic" symptoms (which Aspergians frequently don't have)----but your intelligence is not affected.



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24 May 2021, 6:34 pm

If I remember correctly, the main difference between being diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome or high-functioning autism was whether or not one had started speaking around the usual age. In HFA there was a speech delay and in AS there wasn’t. Pretty sure that’s how I got a diagnosis of Asperger’s when by DSM V I have not a trace of doubt that I’d be diagnosed with ASD level 2, not level 1 (but have not been re-assessed because I don’t know that there’s really a point).


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24 May 2021, 6:36 pm

While not everyone on the spectrum are either high or low-functioning (most are a bit of both, or neither, or "moderate"), there still are some spectrumers who are low-functioning and others who are high-functioning.

For example, this kid I used to know had what we called "severe autism". He was completely non-verbal even at age 9, had very obvious repetitive behaviours, couldn't make eye contact, had meltdowns frequently that were triggered by change or loud noises or the sight of other children, and spent every day in his 'sensory room', in diapers, and constantly had to wear a padded helmet because he sometimes hit his head with his hands as a form of stimming. The last I heard, he is in a care home for adults with learning disabilities that are unable to look after themselves.

That is the perfect example of a low-functioning autistic person. I'm not saying all low-functioning autistic people are the same as him, but he still ranks as low-functioning on the autism spectrum.

As a high-functioning Aspie, I feel like I'm both NT and autistic. The way I see it (and I'm not speaking for anyone else here), NT is red and autism is yellow, mix them both together and you get orange. I feel like orange.


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24 May 2021, 6:43 pm

dragonsanddemons wrote:
If I remember correctly, the main difference between being diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome or high-functioning autism was whether or not one had started speaking around the usual age. In HFA there was a speech delay and in AS there wasn’t. Pretty sure that’s how I got a diagnosis of Asperger’s when by DSM V I have not a trace of doubt that I’d be diagnosed with ASD level 2, not level 1 (but have not been re-assessed because I don’t know that there’s really a point).


This is probably true.
I had no verbal/speech delays, I learnt to talk at the average age. I didn't have many other delays either; I was fully potty-trained by 22 months, I learnt to walk at 11 months, and I smiled for the first time at 4 weeks (according to my parents). I made eye contact as a baby and was very sociable (I could tell by the photos and videos I have). I literally showed no peculiar behaviours until I started school, at 4 years old. Even then the peculiar behaviours I did show weren't obvious signs of autism, which was why I didn't receive a diagnosis of Asperger's until I was nearly 9. And that was because I was closely observed and assessed. I was interested in other children and I never got "exhausted" after school, in fact I used to get home from school then go straight back outside again to play with other children in the neighbourhood.


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24 May 2021, 6:46 pm

I didn't speak until I was 5 1/2.

I had at least some of the "classic" symptoms.

I used to cry constantly in the night.

My parents couldn't take me in a store; I would knock out all the items from the shelves.

I was able to count to 100 and read some words before I was able to speak, though.

I was even diagnosed with autism, and it was suggested that I be institutionalized.

I said my first phrase (not word, phrase) in a camp which did autism research.



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24 May 2021, 6:56 pm

I reached all of my milestones as a baby/toddler at the average stages, but I seemed later than average when learning childhood skills, such as reading. I don't think I could read until I was 7 (my NT mum learnt to read at age 4), and I struggled with remembering the alphabet (I think I was 8 before I could say the whole alphabet). But as a child I was very hyperactive and inattentive, so I think most of my struggles with learning was because of that (which is why I feel annoyed that I wasn't diagnosed with ADHD).


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24 May 2021, 7:05 pm

I'm considered "high functioning" because I can speak and take care of myself, but autism combined with bipolar disorder is bad... I have frequent meltdowns, I had a massive one yesterday afternoon caused by simply forgetting to take my evening pills the night before, I almost got sent to the hospital. Now I'm in a depressed mood state and it sucks bad...


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