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pawelk1986
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25 May 2021, 5:42 am

What do you think, now I am 35 years old and mild autism (Asperger Syndrome) when I was 5-11 years old I liked going to lego exhibitions, I especially liked the model queue there children could play with the controls, change the crossovers etc.

Even though my mother said then that maybe I shouldn't touch it, because on this model it was written that it was for children 10-15 years old and I was about 7 at the time, I remember that then I said that maybe I write there, but I still I am even smarter than those who are 15 years old, but my mother told me not to say that, because it is a sign of pride, and this is a sin and people may take me for an as*hole :-)

Back then my mother did not know that I had Asperger, I was wrongly diagnosed with the suspicion of ADHD, I was diagnosed with Asperger when I was 17 years old, now I am 35 years old



timf
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25 May 2021, 6:42 am

There are a number of factors in play with the scenario you describe.

The exhibit sign posted an age range that was intended to reduce the risk of damage to the exhibit. Your mother (as mothers are inclined to do) saw a prohibition. This might have been accentuated having more experience of Communism and the penalties for not following instructions.

An Asperger child might make an assessment of little risk and see no reason to be inhibited by a sign. The child might think the posted restriction had to do with intelligence and not consider that there could also be other factors such as coordination. The greater focus of Aspergers can lead children in particular to certainties that may not be fully warranted.

It can be difficult to distinguish a persons actions and determine if their motives are an inflated sense of self or if they are missing information.

A child praised for an ability like intellect or an accomplishment like school work, might not have a larger context in which to frame such information. As a result they might be more likely to declare their thoughts on the subject.

The child expresses what he is learning. The adult either learns a larger context that helps him understand that something like intellect is only a small part of existence or he continues to see himself as superior to others.

Arrogance in a child is often excused as bad manners or incomplete learning. Arrogance in an adult is often hidden but reflective of at best incomplete learning and more often as delusion.



pawelk1986
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25 May 2021, 8:08 am

timf wrote:
There are a number of factors in play with the scenario you describe.

The exhibit sign posted an age range that was intended to reduce the risk of damage to the exhibit. Your mother (as mothers are inclined to do) saw a prohibition. This might have been accentuated having more experience of Communism and the penalties for not following instructions.

An Asperger child might make an assessment of little risk and see no reason to be inhibited by a sign. The child might think the posted restriction had to do with intelligence and not consider that there could also be other factors such as coordination. The greater focus of Aspergers can lead children in particular to certainties that may not be fully warranted.

It can be difficult to distinguish a persons actions and determine if their motives are an inflated sense of self or if they are missing information.

A child praised for an ability like intellect or an accomplishment like school work, might not have a larger context in which to frame such information. As a result they might be more likely to declare their thoughts on the subject.

The child expresses what he is learning. The adult either learns a larger context that helps him understand that something like intellect is only a small part of existence or he continues to see himself as superior to others.

Arrogance in a child is often excused as bad manners or incomplete learning. Arrogance in an adult is often hidden but reflective of at best incomplete learning and more often as delusion.


My mom gave it up then, but she told me not to say "I'm smarter than old kids anyway" because people might take me for an as*hole, because it's a sign of hubris and no one will play with me.

By the way, I think my mother didn't want me to do a scene there, because I was a master at forcing what I wanted.

So what in English-speaking countries psychologists call "meltdown" by the way, it is quite inappropriate name, as if I were nuclear reactor number 4 in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant :-)
(I was born at the year and month of Chernobyl April 86)

Anyway, I have another interesting story, my mother sent me to summer camps every year, it was a camp for children with ADHD, Asperger's syndrome, Epilepsy, Down syndrome, or what were referred there by Polish courts because they smoked pot.

My mother sent me there to socialize, she said that in America people pay a lot of money to send their children to such camps, and our Poland may be a poor country, but health and psychological care is financed by the Polish National Health Fund, so I will go there and I will have a lot of fun. :/

And indeed the camp was very great, there was music therapy, art therapy, etc. when you helped the staff in the kitchen etc, you had additional privileges, although the most desirable pass was outside the resort, as someone collected a lot of points.

I did it once, but the doctor did not agree, and she was a bit right because I was gawky :-)
But I was a little pissed off because I was 14 at the time, and I didn't like that these younger kids, those ADHD junkies and jerks, had more privileges than me, that I was treated like I had Down's syndrome.

But it so happened that she got an invitation to some rally of child psychiatrists and psychologists, probably even to America or Canada, only her deputy remained, but my co-mate and friend at the same time, told me that go to him, let me sign a pass, but don't tell him that she refused you, just say that you have problems falling asleep, so that the nurse will give permission to give me a sleep pill if I asked for it and by the way he mentioned that there is a problem in the paperwork that you collected a lot of points but the doctor forgot to issue you a pass, it's called the foot-in-the-door technique.
Well, I succeeded, although later I confessed to her that I framed her deputy, because I felt stupid, the doctor said that she was glad that I confessed to her, that it means that the rules she is trying to instill in us work, that I can keep the pass, that she was afraid that something could happen with my carelessness, she also joked that with such an approach to convincing others to my arguments, I could become an insurance representative of PZU (PZU is a Polish State Insurance Institution), so that I would sell life insurance to people, or lawyer :mrgreen: if I worked on the correct pronunciation