Do you think his doctor is being a bit over the top?

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Jamesy
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04 Oct 2021, 12:29 pm

My cousin who is a naturally big guy and works out with weights was told by his doctor he needed to get down to 200 pounds maximum at 5ft10 1/2 in height.

Do you think his doctor is being a bit over the top or not? I know some weight lifters who have a lot more muscle mass than my cousin.



Fnord
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04 Oct 2021, 12:35 pm

Jamesy wrote:
My cousin who is a naturally big guy and works out with weights was told by his doctor he needed to get down to 200 pounds maximum at 5ft10 1/2 in height.  Do you think his doctor is being a bit over the top or not?  I know some weight lifters who have a lot more muscle mass than my cousin.
Not being a dietician, a physician, or a physical therapist/trainer, I am not qualified to opine on the doctor's recommendations.  However, you did not mention your cousin's age, overall health, and any specific conditions like cancer, diabetes, or heart disease.  His doctor, being an appropriately-trained and license health professional, is more qualified than you or I to determine whether or not his recommendation is "over the top".



funeralxempire
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04 Oct 2021, 12:37 pm

If your frame is only meant to weigh about 175lbs and your heart is typical there's going to be an upper limit on how much body mass it can support without overworking.

The fact that other people also carry too much weight isn't relevant to whether or not your friend is putting himself at risk. Your friend's doctor would likely advise those people to lose weight too.


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Jamesy
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04 Oct 2021, 12:38 pm

Fnord wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
My cousin who is a naturally big guy and works out with weights was told by his doctor he needed to get down to 200 pounds maximum at 5ft10 1/2 in height.  Do you think his doctor is being a bit over the top or not?  I know some weight lifters who have a lot more muscle mass than my cousin.
Not being a dietician, a physician, or a physical therapist/trainer, I am not qualified to opine on the doctor's recommendations.  However, you did not mention your cousin's age, overall health, and any specific conditions like cancer, diabetes, or heart disease.  His doctor, being an appropriately-trained and license health professional, is more qualified than you or I to determine whether or not his recommendation is "over the top".



Not sure about my cousins medical history. I did put his height and weight down on the nhs BMI calculator and the result said “ Excess weight can put you at increased risk of health issues such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke.”



Jamesy
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04 Oct 2021, 12:40 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
If your frame is only meant to weigh about 175lbs and your heart is typical there's going to be an upper limit on how much body mass it can support without overworking.

The fact that other people also carry too much weight isn't relevant to whether or not your friend is putting himself at risk. Your friend's doctor would likely advise those people to lose weight too.



One of my gym friends is 6ft3 1/2 and weigh 238 pounds. Do you think he’s putting himself in danger to?

He can lift the heaviest weights at the gym usually



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04 Oct 2021, 12:43 pm

They do not account for muscle weight as the average person is not that muscular. I used to get this due to cycling where I had massive leg muscles and hips but a very thin upper body. My overall weight was above average due to this even though I looked from my stomache up like I was starving! (I was cycling a minimum of 100 miles and up to 250 miles per week in those days).

The last few years I have hardly ever been out cycling at all due to the effects of the last two burnouts.



funeralxempire
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04 Oct 2021, 12:46 pm

Jamesy wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
If your frame is only meant to weigh about 175lbs and your heart is typical there's going to be an upper limit on how much body mass it can support without overworking.

The fact that other people also carry too much weight isn't relevant to whether or not your friend is putting himself at risk. Your friend's doctor would likely advise those people to lose weight too.



One of my gym friends is 6ft3 1/2 and weigh 238 pounds. Do you think he’s putting himself in danger to?

He can lift the heaviest weights at the gym usually


I'm not a doctor so I can't offer any specific insight, all I know is that being big puts stress on your heart even if you're not fat.


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Jamesy
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04 Oct 2021, 12:51 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
If your frame is only meant to weigh about 175lbs and your heart is typical there's going to be an upper limit on how much body mass it can support without overworking.

The fact that other people also carry too much weight isn't relevant to whether or not your friend is putting himself at risk. Your friend's doctor would likely advise those people to lose weight too.



One of my gym friends is 6ft3 1/2 and weigh 238 pounds. Do you think he’s putting himself in danger to?

He can lift the heaviest weights at the gym usually


I'm not a doctor so I can't offer any specific insight, all I know is that being big puts stress on your heart even if you're not fat.



So In other words if your anything over BMI 25 even if it’s muscle it stresses out your heart?



funeralxempire
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04 Oct 2021, 12:54 pm

Jamesy wrote:
So In other words if your anything over BMI 25 even if it’s muscle it stresses out your heart?


It adds additional work because the bigger you are the more blood there is to move.


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Jamesy
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04 Oct 2021, 12:57 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
So In other words if your anything over BMI 25 even if it’s muscle it stresses out your heart?


It adds additional work because the bigger you are the more blood there is to move.



Add steroids to that it makes matters worse



funeralxempire
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04 Oct 2021, 12:59 pm

Jamesy wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
So In other words if your anything over BMI 25 even if it’s muscle it stresses out your heart?


It adds additional work because the bigger you are the more blood there is to move.



Add steroids to that it makes matters worse


Definitely.

Some supplements have negative impacts on heart health and lots of those guys take stimulants that aren't good for the heart either.


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Blue_Star
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04 Oct 2021, 1:18 pm

Depends on what their percent of body fat is. BMI is a bad measurement for those who exercise regularly & gain muscle.



Last edited by Blue_Star on 04 Oct 2021, 4:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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04 Oct 2021, 2:04 pm

Fnord wrote:
His doctor, being an appropriately-trained and license health professional, is more qualified than you or I to determine whether or not his recommendation is "over the top".


Majority of GP doctors are glorified first line tech support technicians who just follow grossly outdated guidelines. Their recommendations kill more people every year than the worst pandemic. Specialists usually know a lot about specifics in their field, but are completely clueless about how stuff in their field relates to nutrition, lean body mass and physical activity.

Chances that this recommendation based only on meaningless BMI and/or total cholesterol numbers and/or to "prevent" issues they associate with age, which do not happen when person is physically active and maintains lean body mass are extremely high. If he's not fat, but muscular, the only good reason to lose weight under 200lbs at his height I can think of is already developing cardiovascular problems.



Fnord
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04 Oct 2021, 2:32 pm

badRobot wrote:
Fnord wrote:
His doctor, being an appropriately-trained and license health professional, is more qualified than you or I to determine whether or not his recommendation is "over the top".
Majority of GP doctors are ...
Yes, we all know you envision yourself as the final authority on All Things Scientific.

:roll:

But the truth is that even a medical technician is far more of an expert on diet and weight loss than you will ever be.



badRobot
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04 Oct 2021, 3:24 pm

Fnord wrote:
badRobot wrote:
Fnord wrote:
His doctor, being an appropriately-trained and license health professional, is more qualified than you or I to determine whether or not his recommendation is "over the top".
Majority of GP doctors are ...
Yes, we all know you envision yourself as the final authority on All Things Scientific.

:roll:

But the truth is that even a medical technician is far more of an expert on diet and weight loss than you will ever be.

Nope, the truth is GPs are not experts on diet and weight loss at all because nutrition is not part of their formal education. It is an optional course majority of them don't take. Average sports/fitness coach understands nutrition better than average GP because nutrition is important part of their formal education/certification.



Jamesy
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04 Oct 2021, 3:40 pm

badRobot wrote:
Fnord wrote:
badRobot wrote:
Fnord wrote:
His doctor, being an appropriately-trained and license health professional, is more qualified than you or I to determine whether or not his recommendation is "over the top".
Majority of GP doctors are ...
Yes, we all know you envision yourself as the final authority on All Things Scientific.

:roll:

But the truth is that even a medical technician is far more of an expert on diet and weight loss than you will ever be.

Nope, the truth is GPs are not experts on diet and weight loss at all because nutrition is not part of their formal education. It is an optional course majority of them don't take. Average sports/fitness coach understands nutrition better than average GP because nutrition is important part of their formal education/certification.



Mike Tyson is 5ft10 and 220 pounds of muscle. He’s not unhealthy or has heart issues has he?