Would you ever wear a t shirt with the word 'autism' on it?

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Double Retired
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16 Oct 2021, 4:46 pm

Image

I don't wear T-shirts with slogans on them. I strongly prefer clothes with no slogans or pictures or emblems, etc. I even prefer not to have a brand label on them, but if that is unavoidable I want it to be small and not stand out.

With that said IF I wanted a clever autism shirt I think I could find a number at places like this: <link> (plus uninteresting shirts and also shirts that even I think are mildly offensive).

Of the slogans, I think my favorites would be the one in the image above, or "I have Autism, what's your excuse", or "I make Autism look good" (and please let me explain...I don't mean any of you make it look bad, what I mean is compared to my family I think I make Autistic look pretty good compared to Allistic!)

I also think I'd be willing to display a discrete "Actually Autistic".

And I have considered that I might want to wear an Autism Awareness ribbon at conventions.

My viewpoints are certainly affected by my mild symptoms and the fact that I slipped through the cracks until I was 64.


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CarlM
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16 Oct 2021, 9:12 pm

I have thought about wearing a shirt like that. I don't think anything good would come of it and have not done it. I do have a shirt with "Autism" on it though. I ran in a fund raising race (not for Autism Speaks or any similar group) and got a tee-shirt with the name of the race on it. I doubt if many people read it and even then very few would think it suggests I am ASD. I think only people with an interest in autism might say anything and I would be happy to talk to them and might disclose to them if they have some neurodiversity awareness. Otherwise, it's just a race I ran in 8) .


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KimD
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17 Oct 2021, 9:38 pm

Dear_one wrote:
If there was some symbol that would improve the odds of good communication with trained professionals, I'd consider it, but so far, any request for special consideration just inspires people to punish me if I "refuse" to conform. If the pros are hopeless, I assume the general public is as bad. However, I am male, and basically disposable. Women's emotions are usually respected, so they may have better results with a special shirt or other apparel.


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Sweetleaf
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18 Oct 2021, 1:04 am

Idk it would have to have a really clever joke about it...But I would not want to wear something that is just like 'hey I am autistic, no context.'



rse92
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18 Oct 2021, 8:45 am

CarlM wrote:
I have thought about wearing a shirt like that. I don't think anything good would come of it and have not done it. I do have a shirt with "Autism" on it though. I ran in a fund raising race (not for Autism Speaks or any similar group) and got a tee-shirt with the name of the race on it. I doubt if many people read it and even then very few would think it suggests I am ASD. I think only people with an interest in autism might say anything and I would be happy to talk to them and might disclose to them if they have some neurodiversity awareness. Otherwise, it's just a race I ran in 8) .


I wear a t-shirt that says "Autism" and one that says "Embrace Neurodiversity" (people have commented to me on that one). I wear them to raise awareness. I expect most people think I am the father of an autistic child or other relative. It invigorates me like a bit of freedom in a world where only my wife, my ex-wife, my daughters and my step-daughters know I am autistic.