Page 1 of 1 [ 14 posts ] 

GadgetGuru
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 9 Oct 2021
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 266
Location: Northern Nevada, USA

15 Oct 2021, 7:22 pm

For those of you who are overly sensitive to bright light (like sunlight), how does that manifest for you, psychologically?
I'm wondering if very bright sunlight like we often have here in the high desert is affecting me more than I've noticed, and I've just "adapted" to the annoyance/suffering over the years.

To that end, I've ordered a pair of very dark (CAT 4) sunglasses to experiment with, to see if they have any noticeable effect on my state of mind.

I've certainly noticed over the years that I squint terribly all the time when I'm out in full daylight, but beyond that, I'm not sure what's going on.


_________________
Zen Objectivist, Iconoclastic conformist, Laser-focused dilettante, Skeptical psychonaut, Boy genius and stoopit man, Altitudinous observer of the Sturm und Drang.
Practicing the fine art of Enlightened Self Interest.


Mountain Goat
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 13 May 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,971

15 Oct 2021, 7:37 pm

For me I am only just starting to work it out....

I made a comment to my mother today about the dentists. In the past they had those traditional very bright lights (Or they seem to be) which will be close to ones face and shine in ones eyes.
My dentist has a new light which has either four or six blueish little lights, and I noticed that I am calmer with it. Also I am less likely to shut down or have issues. I still am nurvous! But the light itself does not effect me.



Jakki
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Sep 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,944
Location: Outter Quadrant

15 Oct 2021, 7:45 pm

wow had relatives that i visited in the desert areas and you would never see them outside without some good sunglasses. i can tolerate sunlight pretty good . Maybe even desert with extra dark lenses. But its indoor lights that are the worst .. With flourescent being the absolute worst.
Halide lamps can be aweful too i think. Think i would rather stare into the sun sometimes than
look at some of the more brilliant indoor lamps , i have seen... :roll: ......lolz


_________________
Diagnosed hfa
Loves velcro,
Quote:
where ever you go ,there you are


HeroOfHyrule
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 May 2020
Age: 20
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 7,271

15 Oct 2021, 7:53 pm

Bright light doesn't really "hurt" my eyes or anything, but it makes it very hard to focus on things and can be very overwhelming. I'm also not used to it because in my area of WA it's usually cloudy, so when it's super sunny it's worse due to me having no tolerance to it. Bright indoor lights also particularly stress me out for some reason.



CinderashAutomaton
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2021
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 190
Location: Canada

15 Oct 2021, 7:55 pm

My light sensitivity gets worse as my physical or mental health does.

It can range from a slight, subconscious sense of discomfort and stress to full blown vampire mode where a well lit room is painful and the sense of relief and relaxation from being in a dark room feels like walking into a well air-conditioned room after getting out from a heatwave.

...unless you count the tension headaches caused by anxiety from autism stuff, in which case blinding pain which makes it difficult to form thoughts is the new limit.

Typically it just means that I dislike rooms lit more brightly than they need to be, and unshielded lights are quite unpleasant. Unshielded lights at eye level are obnoxiously unpleasant and I can't tolerate them. Bright sunny days don't make me feel bad, but it does make me feel some kind of pressure. Being on the road at night with all the bright car lights against a dark backdrop is right on the fence between painful and not-painful. Highbeams from oncoming traffic is painful.


_________________
Thank you deeply for sharing your experiences. I don't feel so alone anymore.


Cait
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 10 Sep 2009
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 25
Location: Michigan

15 Oct 2021, 9:37 pm

Just a question, are you on Trazedone? It made me SO MUCH MORE sensitive to light than I already was :(


_________________
-Cait-


CinderashAutomaton
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2021
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 190
Location: Canada

16 Oct 2021, 4:55 am

I had been on Trazodone, and I think it might have aggravated my light sensitivity a bit but I can't remember if was the one that did it. It was like two years ago.

I'm not on anything right now. Perhaps what makes my light sensitivity so bad how closely linked poor health and my migraines are. I wouldn't be surprised if it that's a symptom that pops up before the pain. My migraines have a very significant light sensitivity aspect to it.


_________________
Thank you deeply for sharing your experiences. I don't feel so alone anymore.


Mountain Goat
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 13 May 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,971

16 Oct 2021, 5:34 am

HeroOfHyrule wrote:
Bright light doesn't really "hurt" my eyes or anything, but it makes it very hard to focus on things and can be very overwhelming. I'm also not used to it because in my area of WA it's usually cloudy, so when it's super sunny it's worse due to me having no tolerance to it. Bright indoor lights also particularly stress me out for some reason.

Going back when I was in my 20's there was a fashion to put blue tinted bulbs in ones car as they were supposed to be better for driving. Err, no! I tried it and in towns they seemed ok, but as soon as I got out into the countryside to get back home, I could not see to make out where the grass verges were. The tarmac road and the green grass verges looked the exact same colour under the blue light and it was dangerous. I soon put normal bulbs back in!
I have a similar issue with some modern cars lamps. I am fortunate as my car was made when many cars had them but some older designed cars that were still being sold new did not, so my lights are the lovely old ones and they are really good because I like them. I once had a car with the modern lights and the numbers of other cars that would flash at me to dip my lights when they were dipped. If they did that and did not let off I would turn my lights completely off for a few seconds and then put my parking lights on as full beam would have been far too bright for them had I flashed them back. I hated the lights on that vehicle. Many modern cars are awful in this way. They call it progress?

Another thing I did not get on with is modern car dashboards with stupid tablet or computer like instruments. I am not against a form of computer to tell one basic things, but make it descreet so it does not draw ones attention away from driving. I had a Citroen C2 GT for a short while and it had "Knight Rider" style figures in red for the speed, and it was too destracting when driving.
I like the old instruments best. They work fine.
Another modern car design I hate is the electric handbrakes. Horeible things to use and they are costly when one has to change the brake pads.
I am soo glad my Mitsi is an older vehicle. I dread the thought of a modern car because to me it is stepping backwards away from what I want a car to be.
Apart from the false claims of them being green, electric cars do look promissing, but not so practical as I hate the idea of having to bring a smart phone with me to pay to charge them. I would never do that. Too risky for someone to hack into ones bank account. No way! A stupid idea! If I could pay by coins to recharge them it would be fine.



GadgetGuru
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 9 Oct 2021
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 266
Location: Northern Nevada, USA

16 Oct 2021, 6:21 am

Mountain Goat wrote:
Going back when I was in my 20's there was a fashion to put blue tinted bulbs in ones car as they were supposed to be better for driving. Err, no!


Here's an interesting article on this subject, from MANY years ago:

https://www.danielsternlighting.com/tec ... d/bad.html


_________________
Zen Objectivist, Iconoclastic conformist, Laser-focused dilettante, Skeptical psychonaut, Boy genius and stoopit man, Altitudinous observer of the Sturm und Drang.
Practicing the fine art of Enlightened Self Interest.


Mountain Goat
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 13 May 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,971

16 Oct 2021, 6:42 am

GadgetGuru wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
Going back when I was in my 20's there was a fashion to put blue tinted bulbs in ones car as they were supposed to be better for driving. Err, no!


Here's an interesting article on this subject, from MANY years ago:

https://www.danielsternlighting.com/tec ... d/bad.html


Thank you. That was interesting.



GadgetGuru
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 9 Oct 2021
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 266
Location: Northern Nevada, USA

16 Oct 2021, 6:44 am

I often see "fluorescent lights" singled out as being especially irksome.

To be clear, there are several factors with artificial lighting sources that are likely to trigger an annoyance threshold:

1) Flicker:
“old-fashioned” fluorescent lights (think long tubes in a ceiling fixture in an office, warehouse or shop) usually had magnetic ballasts. This is a device that limits current to the lamp, allowing it to work without drawing too much current and failing. But a fluorescent lamp driven this way will flicker badly, since the ballast outputs a 60 Hertz sine wave (in the United States, or 50Hz in much of the rest of the world- even worse), meaning that 120 times a second, the current going through the lamp drops to zero, and with some types of lamps, the light output also drops to near zero at the same time. Also, the color of the light being emitted by the lamp changes continuously through this cycle, due to the lamp phosphors emitting a different balance of colors at varying currents. This “flicker” (varying light amount and color) can REALLY annoy some people.

Note that almost ALL electric lights driven by alternating current will flicker to some degree, even incandescent and LED (some LEDs are terrible in this regard).

Solution:
If you have fluorescent lamps around that aren’t practical to replace entirely, changing the ballast to a modern electronic type will likely help a LOT. These ballasts still have an oscillating current output, but instead of it being 60 times per second, it’s more like 40 THOUSAND times per second, way above the “flicker integration threshold” of any human, and therefore should be much less annoying to live under. Even these electronic ballasts are now becoming obsolete, due to LEDs being the “new thing”, and can be had for free in some cities on Craig’s List (I have a bunch I need to give away at some point).

Switching to LEDs may make the problem WORSE, since many are driven by the cheapest, crappiest “drivers”, and will flicker like mad. The LEDs themselves have NO native flicker if driven by pure DC current (such as when connected DIRECTLY to a battery), but the circuits in between the AC power source (or even a battery) and the LED(s) will often make the LEDs flicker at a rate that can be SUPER annoying.

2) Glare:
Glare means how bright the surface of a light source is, per area (Lumens per square centimeter, or whatever). Any light source that outputs a lot of light, but does so from a small surface area will likely be VERY hard to live with, due to the perceived intensity of the light.

Solution:
Diffusion!- for example, you’ve all seen the recessed “troffer” lighting used in offices. These usually have a large diffuser (often poorly designed) to spread out the light from, for example, a pair of 4-foot long fluorescent tubes. This diffusion can help a LOT, since the same amount of light is now coming from a MUCH larger area.

3) Color temperature:
Sunlight at high noon on a cloudless day has a “color temperature” of about 5,000 to 5,500 Degrees Kelvin. This is what to most people looks like a “clean, pure white”. Cloudy days and in shadows are more of a “bluish” white , perhaps well above 8,000 degrees Kelvin. Old-fashioned incandescent bulbs emitted light at roughly 2,700 to 3,200 degrees Kelvin, quite “yellowish".

Solution:
Since modern LED and fluorescent lamps are available in a WIDE range of color temps, experiment with a few and see if some are more soothing than others to you (I like 5000K).


_________________
Zen Objectivist, Iconoclastic conformist, Laser-focused dilettante, Skeptical psychonaut, Boy genius and stoopit man, Altitudinous observer of the Sturm und Drang.
Practicing the fine art of Enlightened Self Interest.


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 21,671
Location: UK

16 Oct 2021, 8:06 am

I'm not generally sensitive to bright lights, but if I'm outside on a sunny day and I'm tired, I can barely open my eyes without squinting because I feel like I'm going to sneeze. I did have prescription sunglasses but I lost them, and it's socially unacceptable to wear sunglasses in the winter even though the winter sun can be just as bright as the summer sun.

But it's not overly an issue for me, as I prefer daylight to the dark, and I feel comfortable in a brightly-lit room rather than a dimly-lit room.


_________________
Female
Aged 31
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with ADHD, anxiety and mild ASD
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


Mountain Goat
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 13 May 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,971

16 Oct 2021, 8:23 am

I actually get on well with the old filament bulbs, but sadly these are no longer allowed to be sold for household use as when we were in the EU, the EU banned them. The modern low energy types do have that horrible flickering effect and do not give out the brightness I want without them being white but dim. I get on better with the yellowy type of older lights.
The flurescent tube lights give off a better shade of white light to the modern types, but they flicker which is the issue...

Overall, I get on better with the old filament types, but we only have a few left and they are 100W so are a bit too powerful for our light fittings.

I find the noise from the modern low energy bulbs as annoying as the noise from flurescent types, and this makes my ability to relax an issue. The old filament lights were quiet unless they were about to blow!



Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,074
Location: ᜆᜄᜎᜓᜄ᜔

16 Oct 2021, 8:33 am

Strange.
It's not artificial lights that bother me at all.

And for some reason, the sunlight does.

Not sure when it started or why, but I seem to squint and constantly look down whenever I go out without tinted lenses.
I can't look up the sky without hurting my eyes a bit.

It gives me this constant like ache from some glare and some dry like watering for some reason I can't explain.

It's not like I cooped up all day, or that I wear tinted lenses too often. I don't actually had this sensory issue before. Yet I seem to be gradually lost something here...


Maybe it's just my eyes than sensory processing.
Had a brief check up and my eyesight lens changed. My nearsightedness didn't became worse yet it became uneven, and also I developed astigmatism.

And... Contact lenses seem to get rid of this sensory intolerance.


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).