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Aspinator
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26 Dec 2021, 12:58 pm

Gay people wear a mask to hide their sexuality; ASD people wear a mask to hide that they have mild autism. The reason I am posting this is that I have been approached by gay men. Could it be that since they are mask wearers themselves they recognize when somebody else is wearing a mask ?



HighLlama
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26 Dec 2021, 1:13 pm

Maybe. But I think a lot of body language for people on the spectrum presents as "homosexual" to NT people. Some of the odd postures, due to sensory stimulation, which men have can look feminine. I've definitely met gay men who swore I was gay for reasons like this, but I'm as straight and vanilla as they come.

It is unfortunate, as women may think you're gay. Or shy or weak willed, though you may be more dominant sexually.



IsabellaLinton
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26 Dec 2021, 1:31 pm

With all due respect, I don't think all gay people mask. It's a stereotype that gay men act like women (lacking masculinity), or gay women act like men (lacking femininity). Most people don't go around projecting their sexual interests in public, regardless of their orientation.

If you've been approached by a gay man, take it as a compliment that you are good looking. Men (whether gay or straight) are often a bit more comfortable approaching people than women are. There could be women who want to approach you, but they're less comfortable because of cultural gender expectations.

This is just my opinion, by the way, but I do know a lot of gay people and I've never heard of them noticing "autism masks" or being drawn specifically to people for that reason.



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26 Dec 2021, 6:24 pm

I guess I feel less need to mask around women, which has (I suspect) made me generally enjoying the company of women more than with men.
Some men seem to regard spending time with women as a gay thing, I kinda don't really get that notion.

/Mats


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Jakki
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26 Dec 2021, 6:43 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
With all due respect, I don't think all gay people mask. It's a stereotype that gay men act like women (lacking masculinity), or gay women act like men (lacking femininity). Most people don't go around projecting their sexual interests in public, regardless of their orientation.

If you've been approached by a gay man, take it as a compliment that you are good looking. Men (whether gay or straight) are often a bit more comfortable approaching people than women are. There could be women who want to approach you, but they're less comfortable because of cultural gender expectations.

This is just my opinion, by the way, but I do know a lot of gay people and I've never heard of them noticing "autism masks" or being drawn specifically to people for that reason.


Has noticed the same things over the years . But I do not see a lot of gay people going out of their way to put on masks .


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26 Dec 2021, 6:44 pm

I've had gay people approach me with their dick out. Most gay people I meet seem terrible at masking their sexuality.



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26 Dec 2021, 7:41 pm

A man once mistook me for a rent boy when I was about 15 or 16. Possibly my autism made me less concerned about seeming a tad effeminate, or sexually ambiguous or whatever, and about not talking to strange men. I don't think it had anything to do with masking. I didn't know what autism was in those days.