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davewed13
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20 Apr 2022, 4:23 pm

Hello. I went through the ADOS 2 Assessment today and I thought I would share. I know some adults who go through it do not like it. I didn't mind. I found the individual conducting it to be professional and she treated me with respect. It started out with me putting together a puzzle without all the pieces and having to ask for more pieces when I needed them. It was a pretty simple puzzle. I'm unsure of the purpose of it. Next there was a story about frogs where I was only given pictures in a book and I had to tell the story. I found this challenging at first as the story didnt immediately make sense to me, but as it gets going, it has an obvious flow to the plot and I think I did a good job. There were other aspects of the assessment involving story telling as well. At one time I had to pick five objects out of this pile of objects and tell a story using those. And a third time there were six cards and I had to tell a story using those. For the cards, they were of a man fishing and a cat steals the fish he caught but then gets the fish stolen from him by a bird. For this last story, I had to repeat the story again after the cards were away. There were also some questions and conversation with the assessor, mainly about relationships and emotions. I actually had some fun doing it. I am curious about the purpose of some of the activities. Maybe I'll get a chance to ask the assessor at some point.



mohsart
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20 Apr 2022, 4:59 pm

Just guessing, but I suppose there are different ways of telling those storys, as for the fish, eg
- Just telling what happens, without emotions, judgements etc
- Telling it with empathy for the man, but also acknowledging that it's in a cats nature to steal the fish, but hating the bird
- Telling it like an easy come easy go thing

/Mats


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SharonB
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20 Apr 2022, 8:56 pm

I asked my assessor about a few points and was disappointed. I could see a lot more could be inferred from some of the interactions but they were looking for gross (big) responses and disregarding the subtle ones. That said, I "failed" the ADOS 2 --- I was a point below threshold for ASD. Still I was diagnosed with ASD (duh!), even though in public I don't get upset by out-of-reach puzzle pieces and I can tell good stories from visual cues. :D

Good luck for your eval. I hope you get good insights.



IsabellaLinton
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20 Apr 2022, 11:00 pm

Does anyone know how ADOS is scored? Is it a numerical result, and what is the range?

My report says that I was "well above the threshold" (meaning positive), but it doesn't give a number or percentile like my other tests, and there's no anecdotal comment either. All my other test results had lengthy comments attached.

I'm just curious what the threshold number is supposed to be?



davewed13
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21 Apr 2022, 7:23 am

SharonB wrote:
I asked my assessor about a few points and was disappointed. I could see a lot more could be inferred from some of the interactions but they were looking for gross (big) responses and disregarding the subtle ones. That said, I "failed" the ADOS 2 --- I was a point below threshold for ASD. Still I was diagnosed with ASD (duh!), even though in public I don't get upset by out-of-reach puzzle pieces and I can tell good stories from visual cues. :D

Good luck for your eval. I hope you get good insights.


Thanks for sharing. Is the response of many with ASD to get upset by not having all the puzzle pieces? When doing the puzzle, I initially thought they were observing how I put together the puzzle, like if I was doing it in a certain pattern or not - mainly I just tried to not think about it and complete the task as I would have normally done if it weren't an assessment for something. When I needed more I think I just said "I need more pieces" and she gave me more. But I may have asked for more pieces by saying "can I have more pieces." I don't exactly recall.

I like to think of myself as a creative and imaginative person, but I did seriously struggle with some parts of that frog story. I recall several times where I couldn't think of what was supposed to be going on in the story and so there were silences for several seconds as I thought of how the pictures related to the story overall. However, if one were to give me a random prompt and ask me to tell a story about flying frogs and there was no pictures or other structure, I think I'd do fine with telling a made up story.



SharonB
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21 Apr 2022, 9:11 pm

davewed13 wrote:
...When I needed more I think I just said "I need more pieces" and she gave me more. But I may have asked for more pieces by saying "can I have more pieces." I don't exactly recall.

Hahahaha.
Exactly, the evaluator implied they were looking for an outburst and nothing more.
I finished the puzzle with the pieces I had and gave the evaluator a furtive smile. He asked if I was done. I said "yes" --- he looked at me... so I added "unless you want me to use those [out of the way] pieces...". Passive, playful Autist here. I think I should have gotten points for that! :wink:



Elgee
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22 Apr 2022, 12:13 pm

davewed13 wrote:
Hello. I went through the ADOS 2 Assessment today and I thought I would share. I know some adults who go through it do not like it. I didn't mind. I found the individual conducting it to be professional and she treated me with respect. It started out with me putting together a puzzle without all the pieces and having to ask for more pieces when I needed them. It was a pretty simple puzzle. I'm unsure of the purpose of it. Next there was a story about frogs where I was only given pictures in a book and I had to tell the story. I found this challenging at first as the story didnt immediately make sense to me, but as it gets going, it has an obvious flow to the plot and I think I did a good job. There were other aspects of the assessment involving story telling as well. At one time I had to pick five objects out of this pile of objects and tell a story using those. And a third time there were six cards and I had to tell a story using those. For the cards, they were of a man fishing and a cat steals the fish he caught but then gets the fish stolen from him by a bird. For this last story, I had to repeat the story again after the cards were away. There were also some questions and conversation with the assessor, mainly about relationships and emotions. I actually had some fun doing it. I am curious about the purpose of some of the activities. Maybe I'll get a chance to ask the assessor at some point.


I was given the frog story too! I also had to pick five ojects from a pile and make a story about them. As for the "cards," I had a similar version involving a monkey whose coconut was stolen by another monkey. She explained this to me while going through the "cards," then I had to repeat it, but she accompanied my repeat by showing me each card. At the time I didn't know what she was looking for, but after I saw my report (diagnosed ASD), it was explained. If you want me to explain it, I will. Just ask. I'm holding back so as not to spoil it for anyone thinking of getting evaluated.