The importance of improving some symptoms

Page 1 of 1 [ 5 posts ] 

Noamx
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 18 May 2022
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 162
Location: Israel

18 Jul 2022, 10:09 am

This time, I'd like to talk to you about the importance of improving some symptoms of Asperger Syndrome.

Well, for me, there have always been some symptoms which were more serious and as a result were also more important to improve, by various ways. Sometimes my lack of awareness of some of the symptoms, or a lack of my awareness of how to deal with some symptoms, have caused it to remain for a long time, sometimes even years, and I couldnt find a way to solve it. Its not only frustrating, it also feels unfair as many other people who were around my age, didnt have to deal with the Syndrome itself altogether. But guess what? At some point you start to realize, you start to become more aware. I dont know if it has something to do with age, but it might be. Because after about age 24 or 25, it started for me, and guess what? Before that age I wasnt aware of many symptoms. It was a big problem, and I wasnt even aware of the fact I wasnt aware. It made the problem even worse. I think, the most important thing about improving the symptoms is to simply think, what causes you to think or behave differently, think also about how other people would react, or how other people would feel about it, and see if thats the way you want others to feel / think or not. Most of the time its easy when it comes to basic things like a basic request, conversation, questions, and so on. So, the symptom of, for example, being unable to predict how others would think or feel about something, is a relatively easy symptom to deal with, for most basic issues. Thats a good example of an important symptom to deal with, but is not hard to deal with either. Can you guys also give examples of symptoms which were important to you to improve, and were you able to improve them, or did they remain the same?



Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 24,171
Location: UK

18 Jul 2022, 10:18 am

All my symptoms have improved since I've been in a relationship, and I'm not masking.

The only symptoms that seems to have gotten worse as I've gotten older are my ADHD symptoms and my anxiety. But I think my high(er) anxiety levels are to do with losing my mum, and my ADHD symptoms probably haven't got worse exactly, I'm just more aware of them now that I'm officially diagnosed with ADHD, and also the executive functioning demands that come with not living with your parents any more have also made me realise my symptoms more.

But obsession and tantrum controlment have definitely improved. I just throw all my symptoms of ASD on to WP and basically live my life outside of WP as an NT really. Gotta have somewhere to store them. :lol:


_________________
Female
Aged 32

Diagnosed with ADHD
Have Anxiety Disorder
Diagnosed with mild ASD but I don't identify as autistic


skibum
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Age: 55
Gender: Female
Posts: 7,583
Location: my own little world

18 Jul 2022, 10:50 am

Noamx wrote:
This time, I'd like to talk to you about the importance of improving some symptoms of Asperger Syndrome.

Well, for me, there have always been some symptoms which were more serious and as a result were also more important to improve, by various ways. Sometimes my lack of awareness of some of the symptoms, or a lack of my awareness of how to deal with some symptoms, have caused it to remain for a long time, sometimes even years, and I couldnt find a way to solve it. Its not only frustrating, it also feels unfair as many other people who were around my age, didnt have to deal with the Syndrome itself altogether. But guess what? At some point you start to realize, you start to become more aware. I dont know if it has something to do with age, but it might be. Because after about age 24 or 25, it started for me, and guess what? Before that age I wasnt aware of many symptoms. It was a big problem, and I wasnt even aware of the fact I wasnt aware. It made the problem even worse. I think, the most important thing about improving the symptoms is to simply think, what causes you to think or behave differently, think also about how other people would react, or how other people would feel about it, and see if thats the way you want others to feel / think or not. Most of the time its easy when it comes to basic things like a basic request, conversation, questions, and so on. So, the symptom of, for example, being unable to predict how others would think or feel about something, is a relatively easy symptom to deal with, for most basic issues. Thats a good example of an important symptom to deal with, but is not hard to deal with either. Can you guys also give examples of symptoms which were important to you to improve, and were you able to improve them, or did they remain the same?
It sounds like you are beginning to understand how to develop your Theory of Mind. That is excellent!!


_________________
"I'm bad and that's good. I'll never be good and that's not bad. There's no one I'd rather be than me."

Wreck It Ralph


Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,907
Location: ᜆᜄᜎᜓᜄ᜔

18 Jul 2022, 9:02 pm

My "symptoms" improves as my executive functioning does.


And it has many possible causes -- ranging from unaddressed needs to lifestyle issues.

Unaddressed needs could be emotional or mental. Ranging from trauma to overall present circumstances of discontent.

And lifestyle issues can exacerbate -- unhealthy foods, stressful environment, toxic people and people who do not understand your needs...


It's as if I have two versions of myself that fluctuates between several subtle factors; the dysfunctional self and the self behind the dysfunction.

Both are and still are autistic.

The former is that angry little girl who want things easy because everything is hard.
She has no theory of mind because she's incapable of it rendering past good experiences irrelevant.
She's that all-me selfish entitled brat who needs an exorcism.

The latter is a reasonable and reliable person who likes challenges because everything is easy.
She has theory of mind because it happens to her and her experiences are relevant.
She's this reasonable and open-minded person who's in control of herself above else.

The world inside and outside ARE different from one another.

I want to be permanently the latter -- if that were the case, I would've have a serious career by now, have my own life and leave this country but alas. :roll:


It's not just autism I have to be aware of -- I'm past that point of awareness of what being autistic means now I have to be aware as a human. :|

I wish that's just the case for me -- learn what autism is and what accompanies it, then everything's done or making sense.
Sure it's how it is at first decade or so but now, it's no longer in my case.

I have to be aware of the sensitivity nuisances without a nutritionist, being an adult female without going to the OB, my damnable childhood without a therapy.


TLDR; I can solve my autism.
But I cannot solve 'human female body', 'human childhood' or 'human head and heart'.

Example; emotional regulation.

I get the aspects of emotional regulation related to autism, why it is difficult neurologically and how it usually does developmentally.
What to do with it and how it is usually solved.

But how it is tied to my monthly cycle?
How it is tied to my relationships with my caregivers? How it is tied to my diet, stress levels, stimulation and how much I sleep?
I don't. :| I wish it just stops with just knowing autism.

Then autism no longer makes sense of my issues, save for the things I and everyone else already knew.


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).


ToughDiamond
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Age: 69
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,098

19 Jul 2022, 6:39 am

I think one of the biggest improvements I made was when I realised that people's feelings were important. I used to think that everybody was (or should be) like Mr. Spock. I was undiagnosed when I figured out the truth, so I didn't see it as an ASD improvement, I just saw it as part of the process of getting to understand how people tick, which interested me a lot because I'd noticed that my social life was often precariously near to collapsing and I wanted to make sure I would always have some company in my life. Of course figuring out WHAT they're feeling is harder than figuring out that their feelings are important, but clearly I'd have got nowhere without that first step.

I've also worked on my poor short-term memory - if I go into another room to get something and then can't remember what the thing was, I stop and wait for a few moments, and usually the memory comes back. Before that I was mistaking slow recall for complete memory loss, and would give up in despair.