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Kitty4670
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26 Jul 2022, 10:33 pm

Is it hard for Aspergers to talk easily? I mean starting a sentence, like, I can get mix up with do & did, I can have trouble with does too, I have a little trouble starting a sentence. I can have trouble with no & yes answers.


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Dillogic
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26 Jul 2022, 11:02 pm

It's possible. Just because someone has Asperger's doesn't mean they need a good verbal ability. It's generally common that verbal ability is preserved in those with Asperger's, but not always. They tried to distinguish strengths and weaknesses in verbal and performance ability when it comes to Asperger's and high-functioning autism, but in the end, they found there wasn't much difference (Asperger's better verbal and HFA better performance). Someone with HFA can have good verbal ability and someone with Asperger's can have good performance ability. Hence, it's all just ASD now (outside of places still using the ICD-10, and the follow on ICD-11 is all ASD).

IIRC, you have cerebral palsy, which can affect your verbal ability, and that's somewhat common in such.

I have remnants of language disorders from autism, albeit you'd need to know what to look for to find them, at least in writing/typing. Likely easier to spot them when talking, especially when I'm not very familiar with the individual.



ToughDiamond
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27 Jul 2022, 7:24 am

I think Aspies are often relatively slow, deliberate thinkers, so if they try to talk at "normal" speed, mistakes are more likely to happen. In my last job, the head of the unit often seemed rather autistic to me because (for one thing) what he said was always very logical and precise. He spoke very slowly as if he needed lots of time to think of the right words. It occurred to me that if he hadn't been in such a high position in the hierarchy, other people wouldn't have tolerated this and he'd have been under pressure to talk faster. As it was, he was highly regarded as an excellent source of advice. It's rare that I have a good word to say about a bigwig, but I strongly admired his clarity, expertise, and sound reasoning.

Of course this is only a conjecture. I never diagnosed the man or found out for sure why he spoke so slowly.



Kitty4670
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15 Aug 2022, 5:00 pm

ToughDiamond wrote:
He spoke very slowly as if he needed lots of time to think of the right words.



This is like me, I need time to say the right words, this is why I hate talking face to face, I’m better at texting or emailing, I can take my time in thinking of the right words. I have Cerebral Pasly too, I have speech problems, I needed to go to speech therapist when I was going to school. In high school, when I was a Freshman, I wasn’t 14,I was older, I started school late. I also have Psoriasis, I started school at 6 or 8. Anyway. I was more quiet in my freshman year, cuz my speech was sooo bad, I was afraid to open my mouth.


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16 Aug 2022, 4:05 am

There's something called thought disorders, which can be caused by asperger syndrome, and thats what can cause a problem in talking, not necessarily being unable to know how to talk properly or when to speak at the right time. It happened to me in the past, but these days I learned to deal with it better. I thought about the wrong things during a conversation and the wrong words came out of my mouth as a result of that. But today, its quite rare to happen to me. I'm glad I control it better these days, its a very bad asperger syndrome symptom.

Symptoms generally never disappear completely, atleast not some of them, they just become weaker. They exist in the mind sometimes, but on the outside others cant see it on you.


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Gammeldans
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17 Aug 2022, 3:49 am

"Formal thought disorder refers to an impaired capacity to sustain coherent discourse, and occurs in the patient’s written or spoken language"
https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/v ... t_Disorder



Gammeldans
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17 Aug 2022, 3:55 am

ToughDiamond wrote:
I think Aspies are often relatively slow, deliberate thinkers, so if they try to talk at "normal" speed, mistakes are more likely to happen. In my last job, the head of the unit often seemed rather autistic to me because (for one thing) what he said was always very logical and precise. He spoke very slowly as if he needed lots of time to think of the right words. It occurred to me that if he hadn't been in such a high position in the hierarchy, other people wouldn't have tolerated this and he'd have been under pressure to talk faster. As it was, he was highly regarded as an excellent source of advice. It's rare that I have a good word to say about a bigwig, but I strongly admired his clarity, expertise, and sound reasoning.

Of course this is only a conjecture. I never diagnosed the man or found out for sure why he spoke so slowly.

Logical and precise?
Many people with ASD are actually said to sound illogical.