I think I'm having a burnout

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Joe90
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17 Aug 2022, 4:01 am

I feel my routine is so repetitive, I just need at least three consecutive days where I can just do nothing. The weekend isn't long enough and is usually full of things that need to be done that I don't get a chance to do in the week.

I don't have many annual work holiday days but I'm tempted to take a few off so I can take a break from life's demands. But then I feel like I'm wasting them. All I get is 20 days holiday a year, which may seem a lot but it isn't. I need a solid week off every 2 months.

My anxiety levels are high because of what's going on right now in the world, I feel more socially phobic when in public spaces, and I just want to shut the world out and see family and friends and my partner only.

I was going to get signed off work with depression by the doctor but I'm afraid of the stigma, I don't want people to think I suffer from mental illnesses. But I'm tempted to. Should I see the doctor?


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magz
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17 Aug 2022, 7:41 am

I'm not sure about the doctor, I often have difficulty with communicating my needs to them without being misunderstood. Also, I don't really understand the British system.
You likely do need rest. Lots of it, away from it all.
Easier said than done.


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Joe90
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17 Aug 2022, 8:14 am

I've booked 4 days off work, not next week but the week after so that should "recharge my batteries", in other words give me a week's break from the monotony of routine. Communicating doesn't wear me out, just the drudgery of routine. I love my job, it's not that, it's just that I don't have time to relax much. The weekends just fly by. We need 3-day weekends really.

In the UK sometimes the doctor can sign you off work for 2 weeks if you're diagnosed with depression. Why they do it is to help people with depression and anxiety sort things out in their own time without the demand of work then by the time 2 weeks are up hopefully they'll feel bored with not going to work and will be ready to go back, all refreshed. Doesn't always work that way but it does for some.


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Last edited by Joe90 on 17 Aug 2022, 8:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

KitLily
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17 Aug 2022, 8:17 am

Ugh I know what you mean. I want to step off the world for a break sometimes. It's too busy and scary.

Sod those people who think you suffer from mental illnesses. it's none of their business. You might even find that some people say, 'oh yes I had time off for mental illness last year,' or whenever. And they are sympathetic.

My husband had a breakdown last year, the people who matter supported him. I'm always having mental health blips. Most people say, 'oh dear, can I do anything to help?'

Do what is best for YOU and get help. Never mind judgemental people.


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Joe90
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17 Aug 2022, 8:24 am

I just don't want people at work thinking I'm suffering with mental illness. I think there's a stigma attached to mental illness that you're "insane" or "mad" or something. But, then again, I believe mental illness is quite in these days, a lot of NTs I meet seem to be suffering from depression, anxiety, bipolar and personality disorders. Plus my mum did die last year so people might be more sympathetic with that, as most people seem able to empathise with grievance (losing a loved one).


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KitLily
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17 Aug 2022, 8:48 am

Joe90 wrote:
I just don't want people at work thinking I'm suffering with mental illness. I think there's a stigma attached to mental illness that you're "insane" or "mad" or something. But, then again, I believe mental illness is quite in these days, a lot of NTs I meet seem to be suffering from depression, anxiety, bipolar and personality disorders. Plus my mum did die last year so people might be more sympathetic with that, as most people seem able to empathise with grievance (losing a loved one).


I really think people are more sympathetic to mental health problems these days. In the 1980s when my dad died, it was unmentionable. We were just supposed to keep calm and carry on, not tell strangers our problems, stop trying to get attention etc. Ridiculous.

Now days people seem more likely to sympathise, I've found.

I didn't realise you only lost your mum last year! Gosh, sorry to hear that. I thought it was ages ago. If you said, 'my mum died last year,' people would almost certainly be sympathetic.

The ones who judge you wouldn't be nice people and ones to be ignored.


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20 Aug 2022, 12:45 pm

Joe90 wrote:
I just don't want people at work thinking I'm suffering with mental illness. I think there's a stigma attached to mental illness that you're "insane" or "mad" or something. But, then again, I believe mental illness is quite in these days, a lot of NTs I meet seem to be suffering from depression, anxiety, bipolar and personality disorders. Plus my mum did die last year so people might be more sympathetic with that, as most people seem able to empathise with grievance (losing a loved one).


Nobody but HR would know why you are off if you hand in a sick note.


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