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RoadRatt
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01 Sep 2022, 4:08 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
What I learned from my OT is that the limbic system which is responsible for memories, emotions, motivation, learning, and self-preservation, gets overtaxed from years of sensory-social overwhelm and trauma. The limbic system is part of the autonomic nervous system and that regulates our stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol, which in turn control our heart rate and preparedness for battle (the will to live).

When we're in that state of hyper-vigilance for a long time either through self-monitoring, anxiety, rumination, or masking, and demand exceeds capacity, our stress hormones become dysfunctional. We become hypo- or sometimes hypersensitive to stimuli because it's so exhausting to process. That fatigue can affect everything from sleep to hunger, thirst, sexual arousal, and the ability to self-soothe, because our nervous system is connected to every cell in our bodies (all five senses plus digestion, respiration, blood pressure, and cognition or mood). We become more agitated and more tired, causing a vicious circle effect.

Most of us end up exhausted and we avoid sensory-social stimuli as a means of self-preservation. Then we feel vulnerable because our bodies know they aren't safe when we aren't hyper-vigilant.

That's why we feel like we can't or shouldn't go on.

I actually suffered a clinical nervous breakdown about 20 years ago. My adrenal system collapsed from chronic stress / exhaustion, causing me to faint. I was hospitalised because it caused my heart to stop, and nearly killed me. I needed treatment with an Endocrinologist to regulate my cortisol and other stress hormones.

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/a ... 7-cortisol

Do you have an OT?


I have a counselor that I chat with, but that is all.

I looked at your link. That all makes so much sense. I will look into it more. Thanks.


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RoadRatt
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01 Sep 2022, 4:24 pm

Trachea wrote:
I don't know however I think it's not unlike neurotypical burnout in that there is no timeline where you should be feeling better, everyone's situation is unique and unfortunately it's also a reality that some people might not ever recover to quite what they were before. As time goes by, you always get older too which affects energy levels and the recovery process can naturally slow down if you've had burnout before or if you are still struggling with stress management or have co-morbidities that affect your health.

All I can say that helps is to keep stress to as close to zero as possible. The more someone tries to do and be "normal" the longer it takes to recover. I think it is similar to if you ever had the flu with a fever. It will take as long as it takes, and you can be sure that if you try to hurry and do too many things before you are healed, you will usually end up feeling sicker and having to take even more days to rest and recover. All I can advise anyone from my own experiences is to try to be patient and clear your calendar as much as you possibly can, even some fun things might have to go for a bit.

I am personally currently in burnout, 2 years in, and slowly getting a bit better but I expect it might still take another year. I've had burnout once or twice before but this is the longest I've had to recover. It isn't really surprising though, because I was more stressed than ever and had frequent huge meltdowns and lots of bullying and other personal problems and life changes all at the same time. (Could also be affected by having covid).

If your symptoms last for a long while it's good to go get a check-in at the doctor's though, just to rule out it's not related to something else. Long-form exhaustion can also be from stuff like heart or glandular issues, anemia or other deficiencies (common with restrictive eating that is common with AS people).

Hope you feel better soon :heart:


Thanks. I have been under stress since 2011 when I found out that I had to move out of the house I was living in for 19 years. I had never felt comfortable with my housing security until the last couple of years. When the pandemic hit. I had already lost my abilities for nearly a year. After the pandemic, my stress became so high that things started to become physical.

I have been slowly and recovering, and still burning out, for two years now.


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RoadRatt
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01 Sep 2022, 4:30 pm

Doberdoofus wrote:
RoadRatt wrote:
But I am doing better than I have all month.


Glad you are doing better. :D


Thanks. I am doing better today. Just having short term memory problems and other little things. But most of it is now more manageable. Where just a few days ago, they weren't at all.


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01 Sep 2022, 8:54 pm

Actress with Autism Opens Up About 'Autism Burnout'

https://www.boston25news.com/news/local ... HJYVD6KWM/



Trachea
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02 Sep 2022, 2:01 pm

RoadRatt wrote:
Trachea wrote:
I don't know however I think it's not unlike neurotypical burnout in that there is no timeline where you should be feeling better, everyone's situation is unique and unfortunately it's also a reality that some people might not ever recover to quite what they were before. As time goes by, you always get older too which affects energy levels and the recovery process can naturally slow down if you've had burnout before or if you are still struggling with stress management or have co-morbidities that affect your health.

All I can say that helps is to keep stress to as close to zero as possible. The more someone tries to do and be "normal" the longer it takes to recover. I think it is similar to if you ever had the flu with a fever. It will take as long as it takes, and you can be sure that if you try to hurry and do too many things before you are healed, you will usually end up feeling sicker and having to take even more days to rest and recover. All I can advise anyone from my own experiences is to try to be patient and clear your calendar as much as you possibly can, even some fun things might have to go for a bit.

I am personally currently in burnout, 2 years in, and slowly getting a bit better but I expect it might still take another year. I've had burnout once or twice before but this is the longest I've had to recover. It isn't really surprising though, because I was more stressed than ever and had frequent huge meltdowns and lots of bullying and other personal problems and life changes all at the same time. (Could also be affected by having covid).

If your symptoms last for a long while it's good to go get a check-in at the doctor's though, just to rule out it's not related to something else. Long-form exhaustion can also be from stuff like heart or glandular issues, anemia or other deficiencies (common with restrictive eating that is common with AS people).

Hope you feel better soon :heart:


Thanks. I have been under stress since 2011 when I found out that I had to move out of the house I was living in for 19 years. I had never felt comfortable with my housing security until the last couple of years. When the pandemic hit. I had already lost my abilities for nearly a year. After the pandemic, my stress became so high that things started to become physical.

I have been slowly and recovering, and still burning out, for two years now.


I understand, I was almost in a similar situation but it ended up being a blessing when I had to leave beause I moved right before the pandemic started (two weeks in) and my ex home had no yard and tiny window and this one has parks all around and a balcony. I never could have done it though myself without the help of my then-partner. Afterward, I was pretty happy for a while but I had started school where I didn't get any help although I asked for it and then I burned out plus I got pretty heavily bullied and then many other personal life stuff happened on top of that. Then I just kept having really bad meltdowns which drove the burnout to real deep depression.

And now its been two years and I'm more "autistic" than ever, too exhausted to mask at all really and super sensitive to everything. But it's okay. I have great days too and have been getting a bit more energy since I started really focusing on eating more healthy, maybe theres some hope for recovery some day. But I know it might take another year. I just fear that if something bad happens again that I can't handle then my recovery will stretch on. But I think its important to try to stay positive like with fighting any illness, that the mental state of "I can get through this" is what you need even when it's rough.