Reasons why I feel I lack intelligence

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kraftiekortie
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05 Sep 2022, 2:44 pm

I was about 13 when “Conjunction Junction” came on. It taught me well.

The series started with “Multiplication Rock.”



naturalplastic
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05 Sep 2022, 2:48 pm

If you take a foreign language in middle school or high school youre kind of forced at gun point to remember that stuff. Do, or die. Thats probably the main reason it sticks for me even now.

In Spanish "chica bonita" means "pretty girl" because the noun comes before the adjective in Spanish.

A lady teacher (of anthropology, not Spanish) made a complete idiot of herself in front of us once because she thought that "gordo" (pronounced "GORE-d-though) meant "pig". And she expounded about how Gordo is a better word for the animal because it sounds like a big rude animal, when our word "pig" sounds like a little wee thing.

Apparently, she once heard someone utter the phrase "cochino gordo" (fat pig) and assumed the English word order, and didnt know that the Spanish word for "pig" is "cochino", and not gordo. :lol:



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05 Sep 2022, 2:56 pm

How much you get charged for a Ghostwriter(official term they use) depends on the type of book, their experience, how many books they have to write, the time it would take, etc. From doing research I found you might get charged hourly($30 to $100) per word ($1 to $3) or a flat rate of $6,000 to $10,000. Now I did research on dollars to pounds and the rate is 1 dollar to 1.01 euro.

Now considering this book is an autobiography and is about your life and I'm sure you want to include all the mental health things in it and it includes drama it will probably explode your bank... The writer would have to do research on mental health, how these types of stories sell in the market and other stuff as well. They also have to try to figure out how to write it in a way that pleases you and they will check for spelling errors, punctuation, run on scentences, etc. Let's just say...there is a reason why many books never make it on the shelf.

IsabellaLinton the gesture is nice but, ghostwriting can actually be frustrating and I'm just saying all this because I wouldn't want you to put yourself in a position that you wasn't expecting and become overwhelmed.


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kraftiekortie
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05 Sep 2022, 3:06 pm

I don’t sense that Isabella would be “ghostwriting.”

She seems to have offered to type Joe’s manuscript, and maybe do minor editing.



IsabellaLinton
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05 Sep 2022, 3:09 pm

I've done non-fiction ghost writing, and I wrote an entire mayoral campaign.

Yes it can be hard work if there's editing involved.

My understanding is Joe just wanted her work transcribed to digital, with basic formatting but no editing.
Then she would hire a separate editor when she decides how to publish.
Maybe I misunderstood.

Where are you in UK, Joe?
My daughter and her friends in Nottingham might be interested.
They're all writers and editors, although they're quite busy with work.



naturalplastic
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05 Sep 2022, 3:15 pm

Yes.

Isabella is volunteering to be stenographer. Not a ghostwriter.

Maybe a bit of an editor too.



Joe90
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05 Sep 2022, 3:50 pm

Quote:
Where are you in UK, Joe?
My daughter and her friends in Nottingham might be interested.
They're all writers and editors, although they're quite busy with work.


I'm in Essex.

Quote:
They also have to try to figure out how to write it in a way that pleases you and they will check for spelling errors, punctuation, run on sentences, etc


Checking for spelling and punctuation errors won't be too much work for them because my spelling and punctuation is very good (yes I know it's ironic to say that in this thread but this is why I want to get use out of the only thing I do consider myself good at).

My plan is to pay somebody to copy my handwritten books on to a computer then go on to self-publish my books.

Yes, writing is what I'm into the most, but out of all my friends and family I'm the only one with this interest. I just wish there was someone I could talk to in person about it. I mean, there's nothing wrong with following your dreams, right?


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kraftiekortie
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05 Sep 2022, 4:58 pm

Certainly not! :)



Joe90
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05 Sep 2022, 5:15 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Certainly not! :)


My boyfriend says that I could become the next JK Rowling (not in a mocking way, but in an encouraging way). Unfortunately he doesn't really know the first thing about storywriting and publishing so he can't really help there, but it's nice to be encouraged.

OK, I think I'm jumping the gun a bit here but you never know, people might really like my stories, especially adolescents, and it could make its way to the film industry, like Harry Potter did.
Harry Potter is enormously popular and well-liked by people of all ages, but all that started it was a simple notebook and a pen. I don't know if this is true or not but I heard JK Rowling began getting ideas for her stories by sitting in a coffee shop with a notepad and pen. Now look how far it's come.


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05 Sep 2022, 6:19 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
I'm good at writing but I couldn't tell you what adjectives and nouns and all that are, even after reading about it.

This is actually... For the lack of better word, normal.

Really, who bothers knowing which is which unless they're linguists, translators or teachers or something?

Actually, no. I know teachers that still struggle to tell which is which. And no, none of them are ND or weird.


I beg to differ. I never meet anyone over ten years old who had trouble remembering the difference between adjective and a noun.

By knowing I mean knowing it's definitions in an academic manner (ones that are labeled as adjectives and nouns and formally define it), not the obvious parts that any school grader can do (knowing what is describing words and naming words in a sentence).

But still, this is interesting.
Does this mean an average adult there can remember all those lessons in language?
Because here, it's like the same way one remembers all those math lessons in highschool.

I wonder if it's something to do with how it's being taught and how the language is being used and prioritized over.

Because the circumstances here is almost always about the communication and usage of that language (the practice), not the academics and linguistic aspects of that language (like knowing what type of sentence is being used).


And I don't feel the same about this misperception of intelligence.
Aspie stereotypes, specializations, being greater theorizers and the level of articulation needed to get around with those things.
I just see this as a different type of intelligence.

Doesn't stop being frustrating by itself though -- not being able to express clearly with words, not word fancy enough to be taken seriously or too word fancy to comprehend -- now this, I can understand.


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Last edited by Edna3362 on 05 Sep 2022, 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

CockneyRebel
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05 Sep 2022, 6:35 pm

I also feel that I'm not as intelligent as most of the people on WP, because I need to wear special underpants.


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kraftiekortie
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05 Sep 2022, 6:44 pm

Don’t forget: Stephen Hawking required “special underpants.”

He was a genius scientist.



naturalplastic
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05 Sep 2022, 7:12 pm

Edna3362 wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
I'm good at writing but I couldn't tell you what adjectives and nouns and all that are, even after reading about it.

This is actually... For the lack of better word, normal.

Really, who bothers knowing which is which unless they're linguists, translators or teachers or something?

Actually, no. I know teachers that still struggle to tell which is which. And no, none of them are ND or weird.


I beg to differ. I never meet anyone over ten years old who had trouble remembering the difference between adjective and a noun.

By knowing I mean knowing it's definitions in an academic manner (ones that are labeled as adjectives and nouns and formally define it), not the obvious parts that any school grader can do (knowing what is describing words and naming words in a sentence).

But still, this is interesting.
Does this mean an average adult there can remember all those lessons in language?
Because here, it's like the same way one remembers all those math lessons in highschool.

I wonder if it's something to do with how it's being taught and how the language is being used and prioritized over.

Because the circumstances here is almost always about the communication and usage of that language (the practice), not the academics and linguistic aspects of that language (like knowing what type of sentence is being used).


.

I dont know what youre getting at.

The "academic definition" and colloguial gradeschool kid definitions are the same dumb simple definitions. "A noun is a thing", "a verb is an action", "an adjective is a word that describes a noun", and an "adverb is word that describes a verb", and "a pronoun is a word that stands for a noun". Noam Chomsky(the most famous linguist on the planet), and a grade school kid would both explain it to you in the same simple way as above.

And in order to learn to converse in another language you have to be aware that not every language has the same word order as your own. So you have to learn what an adjective IS before you can grasp that "bonita" comes after "chica" in Espanol, and not before.



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05 Sep 2022, 7:21 pm

Learning languages at school was difficult for me, even though learning a new language is supposed to be easier the younger you are.

I even developed a special interest with Spanish, like I became obsessed with it. It was my favourite subject in school for a while, and I even bought books to help me learn at home. But I still kept getting it wrong in class, and at home I had such trouble focusing on the books that I just gave up and the obsession faded away in the end.

I just thought that how the autistic mind worked is memorizeng lots of facts about a special interest (if they have one) and being able to know everything about it and become skilled in that particular subject. Like typically, if a child with autism had a special interest in countries around the world they'll want to engross themselves in atlases and other books about the countries and know lots of facts about it, and then get high grades in geography class.


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05 Sep 2022, 7:27 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Don’t forget: Stephen Hawking required “special underpants.”

He was a genius scientist.


I needed special underpants after having my bladder and bowel resections.




Joe,

My daughter has trouble with some noun / adjective distinctions.
For example she thinks "happiness" is an adjective because of "happy".
She gets confused by conceptual words and emotions.

She could learn other languages but not the formal grammar.
She's a very accomplished writer, though.
You don't need to know the terminology if you can construct sentences with ease.



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05 Sep 2022, 7:58 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Edna3362 wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
I'm good at writing but I couldn't tell you what adjectives and nouns and all that are, even after reading about it.

This is actually... For the lack of better word, normal.

Really, who bothers knowing which is which unless they're linguists, translators or teachers or something?

Actually, no. I know teachers that still struggle to tell which is which. And no, none of them are ND or weird.


I beg to differ. I never meet anyone over ten years old who had trouble remembering the difference between adjective and a noun.

By knowing I mean knowing it's definitions in an academic manner (ones that are labeled as adjectives and nouns and formally define it), not the obvious parts that any school grader can do (knowing what is describing words and naming words in a sentence).

But still, this is interesting.
Does this mean an average adult there can remember all those lessons in language?
Because here, it's like the same way one remembers all those math lessons in highschool.

I wonder if it's something to do with how it's being taught and how the language is being used and prioritized over.

Because the circumstances here is almost always about the communication and usage of that language (the practice), not the academics and linguistic aspects of that language (like knowing what type of sentence is being used).


.

I dont know what youre getting at.

The "academic definition" and colloguial gradeschool kid definitions are the same dumb simple definitions.

It's not the case here.

The former is explicitly taught at school, the latter is a form of comprehension.
The former can be forgettable for not being a term used in daily conversations and has to be manually retrieved when brought up, the latter sticks in the background as soon as it was formed in childhood.

It's not just me either.
I really wonder why is this.


And yes any bilingual who went to school would be aware of the language differences.

The native version of the terms here are actually harder to memorize and study than the non-native English counterparts for reasons I cannot enumerate without derailing this thread.


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