Your experience with ABA/teachers etc.,

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MichieBCBA
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24 Sep 2022, 3:26 am

Hello wonderful people!

I would love to know your experience with those working in ABA and teachers: can you tell me your favorite things you have experienced with teachers/therapist and the stuff that bothered you the most or negative experiences and why or how it made you feel?

Would so appreciate the information



Dear_one
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24 Sep 2022, 6:51 am

ABBA made a substantial contribution to Sweden's tax collectors, but I don't know about this new group.
I had a math teacher who was frustrated that I had lower than expected marks, and wanted to talk about cars. Many years later, I taught myself how to use math to make better cars. He could have given me car problems to solve.
My best counsellor had little training, so we collaborated on my diagnosis. Her talent could be described as remedial parenting, and an art, not a science.



jimmy m
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24 Sep 2022, 11:44 am

BCBA might indicate that you are a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. I have Asperger's Syndrome and it has taken me almost my entire life to figure out why I am different and why I think differently. I am 74 years old and I suffered a massive stroke a year and a half ago. I probably lost around 2 percent of my brain cells, but I am coming back on line.

Because I am an old timer, I never went through the approach used to correct and help individuals who are different. I have had a good life, even though it was fairly rough in the beginning in my Junior High School years. But after that period, I survived the physical and mental abuse of my peers, and then my skill set began to take off and I found my way in this world.

I do not advocate giving (mental altering) drugs to high functioning autistic because sometimes one has to find their way in this life even though it can be painful. And an approach that adds drugs (prescription or otherwise) can damage our brains. It can take away our distinct skill set that makes us different.


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CockneyRebel
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25 Sep 2022, 5:49 am

I grew up in a time when kids could still be kids. I'm a free-range aspie. I lived a free-range childhood.


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25 Sep 2022, 11:20 am

My diagnosis was Autism Spectrum Disorder, Level 1 (Mild), with a note that I also satisfy the criteria formerly associated with Asperger's Syndrome. I was diagnosed shortly before my 65th birthday, after I'd already been voluntarily, happily, comfortably retired for eight years. I got the Adult Autism Assessment because I was curious, not because I needed it, and I was delighted by the diagnosis because it explained so much of what I'd experienced in life...but my diagnosis hasn't really had any practical use for me.

And I've done reasonably well in life. My no-longer-needed resume is good. (Good enough that I retired comfortably at 56!)

Asperger's wasn't in the DSM until 1994, the year I turned 40, so I could not have been diagnosed as a child because there was no diagnosis that applied to me.

The reason I got an Adult Autism Assessment (at age 64!) is that my then 88 year old father was visited by a child who was thought possibly to be Autistic. And several times Dad said the kid was doing the same "weird" things I used to do...almost 60 year earlier. Given that, I'll guess that if the diagnosis had been available when I was a child it is quite possible those "weird" behaviors would have lead to me getting diagnosed and maybe getting ABA treatment.

And I strongly suspect having gotten that label as a child would have greatly changed my life...for the worse. I think some opportunities would not have been available to me if I had that label. I doubt I would've done as well professionally and financially.

So I'm glad I did not get the diagnosis as a child and didn't go the ABA route.

Perhaps some martial arts classes when I was kid could've been helpful, though. Maybe I'd have fared better with the bullies.


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Ettina
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25 Sep 2022, 2:26 pm

MichieBCBA wrote:
Hello wonderful people!

I would love to know your experience with those working in ABA and teachers: can you tell me your favorite things you have experienced with teachers/therapist and the stuff that bothered you the most or negative experiences and why or how it made you feel?

Would so appreciate the information


Favorite thing - when I infodumped to her about octopi and found out she thought they were neat, too.

Least favorite thing - when she picked a silly fight with me about whether my sensory hypersensitivities made certain foods things I "can't eat" or things I "don't want to eat" on the assumption that I was not allowed to refuse foods I didn't want to eat, and when I started spiralling emotionally, decided to pretend I'd ceased to exist, even when I started having self-harming urges, so I ended up having to call a suicide hotline, and then when my parents and I had a meeting with her to discuss how to avoid this happening again, she wanted to get even more stubborn and nitpicky about pointless things, including telling me that my inability to wear a bra meant I'd never be employed, and also wanted permission to kick me out onto the bus when I had another episode like that.

So, overall, 0/10 experience. I can find much better people to infodump to. And I'm very glad I wasn't diagnosed as a child.



Aspie1
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28 Sep 2022, 6:51 pm

I had undisclosed/covert ABA therapy. That is, I was never told it was ABA, but it in retrospect, it was ABA. So if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck...

My therapist relied on hints and a game of cat-and-mouse to run ABA on me. Nothing was disclosed to me at the start; I was told to "just share". And yet, there were hidden expectations. If I told her something she wanted to hear, like me getting an A on a test, she'd praise me gushingly. If I told her something she didn't want to hear, like how my parents emotionally abused me, she'd tilt her head to the side and make a cooing noise "awwww"---it was meant to mock me and intimidate me into changing the topic. There were also neutral topics, like the video games I played, that got me neither praise nor mockery. And it was my job to pick up on her hints and adjust my statements accordingly. I got good at it eventually, but it took me at least a year, if not two years.

I'd give that ***** [female dog] a -1/10 for her therapy skills. She was my parents' flying monkey pretending to be my friend, and I picked up on it very quickly.