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HP Love
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Joined: 27 Sep 2022
Age: 43
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30 Sep 2022, 1:09 pm

After I got my diagnosis last year, I watched a couple of films and TV shows about people with Asperger's. I didn't necessarily pick the best ones, but still, I came away feeling like... this isn't for me. I'm glad it's there for the people that will get something out of it, but I don't feel so much like I'm relating in any meaningful way. I don't feel like I'd want to show this to someone and say "THIS is what it's been like for me!".

Which got me thinking: what WOULD make me feel represented with regard to Asperger's representations in media?

Partially, I think it would have to have the element of finding out late in life (42 for me). But other than that... I really don't know. The stuff I've tended to connect to on this level has been less stuff ABOUT being autistic, and more stuff BY people who are autistic (or who think in ways that I think of as autistic ways to think), about their experiences of going through the world. David Byrne is a perfect example.

Anyway... this all got me wondering: what types of media, if any, have made you feel like you connect with them on an autism-related level, or they make you feel "seen", etc.? Have you found art about the experiences of autistic people appealingly relatable, or has anyone else felt a little bit left cold like I have?



Double Retired
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Joined: 31 Jul 2020
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30 Sep 2022, 1:34 pm

I like Newt Scamander from the Fantastic Beasts (film series). Actor Eddie Redmayne, who played Newt, thought Newt was on the Autism Spectrum.

More realistically, however, the film Adam [2009] probably has a more realistic sort-of-like-me character.


_________________
When diagnosed I bought champagne!
I finally knew why people were strange.


jinxmylo
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Joined: 6 Oct 2022
Age: 50
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Location: Ohio

06 Oct 2022, 9:05 am

I loved Everything's Gonna Be Okay. Gender/sexuality variety in the autistic characters, and has an adult diagnosis plotline at the end of the second season. I'm actually using it for part of my dissertation.