What's the best thing or job to do

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Highly_Autistic
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30 Oct 2022, 4:39 pm

I mean, what are the best jobs or things to do for someone with aspergers?

What do you do for a living, and when did you start working?
Because, I'm still unemployed and almost 25. Im not a lazy person but i have aspergers and dont fit in ordinary human crowd.

A lot of people say building a network makes it easy to find a job or career, but I hate hanging out with people. And I have a small circle of just family.

Do you have any suggestions or past experiences



kraftiekortie
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30 Oct 2022, 5:18 pm

I’ve been a data-entry operator for over 40 years.

Very Aspergers-friendly job.



drgafanovich
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03 Nov 2022, 2:57 am

Being an entrepreneur is a very Aspergers-friendly and rewarding activity



Texasmoneyman300
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20 Nov 2022, 7:59 am

drgafanovich wrote:
Being an entrepreneur is a very Aspergers-friendly and rewarding activity

Ya the reason why i became a entrepreneur with my dad is because I could never get a good job.



kraftiekortie
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20 Nov 2022, 8:32 am

I don’t have the desire or inclination to be an entrepreneur.

I don’t have the “sales gene,” and I hate hard-sell tactics.



amykitten
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21 Nov 2022, 8:55 am

Highly_Autistic wrote:
I mean, what are the best jobs or things to do for someone with aspergers?

What do you do for a living, and when did you start working?
Because, I'm still unemployed and almost 25. Im not a lazy person but i have aspergers and dont fit in ordinary human crowd.

A lot of people say building a network makes it easy to find a job or career, but I hate hanging out with people. And I have a small circle of just family.

Do you have any suggestions or past experiences


It depends on the person. Studies have shown we thrive in emergency response roles as we can remain calm and go through the correct protocol. We're decent accountants, engineers, programmers. My daughter wants to be a cat sitter and that is perfect for her if she so wishes to do so when she grows up.

So what is it that you want to do? What are your passions and interests?



kraftiekortie
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21 Nov 2022, 9:25 am

Cat sitter can turn into veterinary assistant----or even a veterinarian. There will be a great market for pet doctors in the future.

Or maybe even a market for pet medical insurance.



SharonB
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23 Nov 2022, 10:34 pm

Contract jobs were my path to a career. My BFF did data-entry jobs for a while after her Masters. I was 27 when I "fell" into my career. My ASD BFF was 30-something when she "fell" into hers. Over 20 years later, we are both well-respected professionals. I am constantly amazed at remember my 27th birthday, homeless and in tears ----never imaging the hardships and the triumphs I have endured and achieved that many years later. Don't blink! :wink:



Minuteman
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23 Nov 2022, 10:40 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I don’t have the desire or inclination to be an entrepreneur.

I don’t have the “sales gene,” and I hate hard-sell tactics.


Same here. I had a sales job when I was younger and was awful at it. Not sure if it's an Asperger's trait, but I'm bad at thinking on my feet, which is why I was so bad at sales.



DoniiMann
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01 Dec 2022, 4:27 pm

Two previous jobs had both common and different characteristics. one was server in a café, the other was a factory.

What they had in common was the noise and the fast pace. These are traditionally considered bad for ASD, but whereas I failed in café, I succeeded in the factory. And it came down to the fundamental difference between these two jobs.

Cafés are chaotic. Any order combination, to be served in any table combination appropriate for the time, for any number of customers, with any type of personalities.

By contrast, once I learned my factory duties and built up into a flow state, disruptions were rare. Everything was well ordered.

Anyway, my point is, don't get to caught up in superficial lists of what we like. If we did, we'd avoid loud and fast factories. Learn to break down each potential job to its essential characteristics and work out your own unique aspects. Make matches and create a short list. Take it from there.


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JustFoundHere
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22 Dec 2022, 4:21 pm

Anybody consider TECH. careers involving 'user experiences?' All too often, user experience(s) of TECH. products, services, etc. etc. are anything but satisfactory - disappointing!

There are ample career opportunites to design, and build TECH. products/services which 'NON-TECH. savvy' users (most of the TECH. related market demographics) can readily, and intuitively understand, and benefit.

The discussion-thread in the WP Topical Discussion Forum - 'Computers, Math Science, and Technology Forum'
'TECH Concerns, Pet Peeves, Whys & Why Nots Of TECH Etc. Etc.' offers relevant examples.



renaeden
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24 Dec 2022, 3:12 am

I was a forklift driver for 7 years. It required precision and high concentration. Over time I became very good at it.



Aces High
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24 Dec 2022, 4:09 am

Regulatory compliance roles. Or is that just me? I could really get into that if given a chance. Got the paperwork at least. That is something.



Eurythmic
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28 Dec 2022, 10:56 pm

DoniiMann wrote:
What they had in common was the noise and the fast pace. These are traditionally considered bad for ASD, but whereas I failed in café, I succeeded in the factory. And it came down to the fundamental difference between these two jobs.

Cafés are chaotic. Any order combination, to be served in any table combination appropriate for the time, for any number of customers, with any type of personalities.

By contrast, once I learned my factory duties and built up into a flow state, disruptions were rare. Everything was well ordered.


I work in a hospital operating a particular type of life support equipment. I like it because I only work as a form of recreation because I believe in what I do. The surgeons and intensivists and surrounding staff take the attention of the patients and their families. My job is very technical, I deal with facts and figures and know the equipment I operate inside and out. Aside from polite greetings to my colleagues when I arrive everyone leaves me alone to do my stuff. I'm very happy being the wallflower, I love coming in when I'm needed and quietly going home after the job is done. It's a great job for a 'sperg because emotions and "soft skills" don't come into it.



Joe90
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28 Dec 2022, 11:20 pm

The AS-friendly jobs aren't so ADHD-friendly, and vice versa. So if you have both AS and ADHD (or anxiety and ADHD) then every job out there will go against either one or the other.

Don't get me wrong, I do like my job cleaning coaches. But sometimes it can get a bit repetitive and other times there aren't always coaches available to clean so the day can drag a bit.

Sometimes I wish I could do something more exciting, like one of those jobs where no two days are the same and you're just doing whatever the job throws at you in the moment. But those sorts of jobs usually require brains and skills like passing a course, being organised and able to work under pressure, remembering a lot of facts and information, and having normal emotional regulation - which are all the things I have trouble with.

So, cleaning jobs it is.

I would love to be a class assistant in a reception class (children age 4-5) but I have a crippling fear of sickness, and those things often go around in schools full of young children. So that's out of the question. Also I have a fear of school bells, so it's best if I just avoid anywhere that relies on those things to tell the time.
I'd love to work with dead bodies because I seem to be fascinated with the deceased and morbid stuff like that. No, I'm not a sociopath.


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IsabellaLinton
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29 Dec 2022, 2:12 am

I did a career assessment thing when I was 14 and it said I should be a mortician.
It was because I said I wanted to work alone indoors without having to speak to anyone.