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Gammeldans
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07 Nov 2022, 2:33 am

Howdy folks!
I hear about groups for people with ASD, ex. a group for people learning the art of cooking or running.
So what the deal with having no NT people in the group? How will that make thing so much easier?

Please explain what this is all about.



ASPartOfMe
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07 Nov 2022, 5:46 am

Gammeldans wrote:
Howdy folks!
I hear about groups for people with ASD, ex. a group for people learning the art of cooking or running.
So what the deal with having no NT people in the group? How will that make thing so much easier?

Please explain what this is all about.

i don’t know about so much easier but all ASD groups tend to be more tolerant to accepting of your “quirks”. We are not the same but other Autistics tend to understand at least somewhat how you think, your struggles.


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Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


Gammeldans
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07 Nov 2022, 8:55 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
Howdy folks!
I hear about groups for people with ASD, ex. a group for people learning the art of cooking or running.
So what the deal with having no NT people in the group? How will that make thing so much easier?

Please explain what this is all about.

i don’t know about so much easier but all ASD groups tend to be more tolerant to accepting of your “quirks”. We are not the same but other Autistics tend to understand at least somewhat how you think, your struggles.

What are "quirks"?



ASPartOfMe
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08 Nov 2022, 12:01 am

Gammeldans wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
Howdy folks!
I hear about groups for people with ASD, ex. a group for people learning the art of cooking or running.
So what the deal with having no NT people in the group? How will that make thing so much easier?

Please explain what this is all about.

i don’t know about so much easier but all ASD groups tend to be more tolerant to accepting of your “quirks”. We are not the same but other Autistics tend to understand at least somewhat how you think, your struggles.

What are "quirks"?

Free Dictionary
Quote:
A peculiarity of behavior; an idiosyncrasy: "Every man had his own quirks and twists" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


Gammeldans
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08 Nov 2022, 2:22 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
Howdy folks!
I hear about groups for people with ASD, ex. a group for people learning the art of cooking or running.
So what the deal with having no NT people in the group? How will that make thing so much easier?

Please explain what this is all about.

i don’t know about so much easier but all ASD groups tend to be more tolerant to accepting of your “quirks”. We are not the same but other Autistics tend to understand at least somewhat how you think, your struggles.

What are "quirks"?

Free Dictionary
Quote:
A peculiarity of behavior; an idiosyncrasy: "Every man had his own quirks and twists" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).

And only people with ASD have "quirks"?



rse92
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08 Nov 2022, 12:10 pm

It is very hard to find an in person support group for autistic people. Where I live, there are a number for parents and caretakers of autistic children (I suppose there a a number everywhere), but the one I attend is the only one I could find. It's a group in floating number (4 to 9 at any one meeting) sponsored by a local autism services firm. There is a diversity among the participants as to how profoundly their autism impacts them. I really have practically nothing in common with these people other than my autism. Still, they listen to my problems and struggles, I listen to theirs, and we bond.

I look forward to it very much. I told the executive director that it is the one hour a month I can freely be autistic.

I am so happy to have this group in my life that I joined the board of directors of the organization, and I am the only autistic director.



ASPartOfMe
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08 Nov 2022, 9:26 pm

Gammeldans wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
Howdy folks!
I hear about groups for people with ASD, ex. a group for people learning the art of cooking or running.
So what the deal with having no NT people in the group? How will that make thing so much easier?

Please explain what this is all about.

i don’t know about so much easier but all ASD groups tend to be more tolerant to accepting of your “quirks”. We are not the same but other Autistics tend to understand at least somewhat how you think, your struggles.

What are "quirks"?

Free Dictionary
Quote:
A peculiarity of behavior; an idiosyncrasy: "Every man had his own quirks and twists" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).

And only people with ASD have "quirks"?

No


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


Gammeldans
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10 Nov 2022, 2:29 am

If so, then why would people with ASD be more accepting of the other group members quirks?

Are groups for people with ASD smaller? I mean, we dislike big groups, right?
Actually, I think many people with NT can't stand big groups but they are probably better at dealing with it.



princegeorge99999
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10 Nov 2022, 8:21 am

Gammeldans wrote:
If so, then why would people with ASD be more accepting of the other group members quirks?

Are groups for people with ASD smaller? I mean, we dislike big groups, right?
Actually, I think many people with NT can't stand big groups but they are probably better at dealing with it.


have you been diagnosed? i feel like medical professionals recommend support groups. mine did because i felt a lot of shame and denial and they wanted me to work to see that i’m not damaged. this seems like a healthy path forward versus depression and shame. ya know?



Gammeldans
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11 Nov 2022, 2:54 am

princegeorge99999 wrote:
Gammeldans wrote:
If so, then why would people with ASD be more accepting of the other group members quirks?

Are groups for people with ASD smaller? I mean, we dislike big groups, right?
Actually, I think many people with NT can't stand big groups but they are probably better at dealing with it.


have you been diagnosed? i feel like medical professionals recommend support groups. mine did because i felt a lot of shame and denial and they wanted me to work to see that i’m not damaged. this seems like a healthy path forward versus depression and shame. ya know?

I am in a group for people with ASD but it is not easy being a part of the group just because it is an ASD group!

Btw, I don't recall hearing about a support group when I was diagnosed. All I remember was that I told the people doong the dioagnoes that I did not want to play with them dolls and that they looked at how I threw a tennis ball. :x



ilovepalmtrees
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11 Nov 2022, 12:54 pm

My guess would be autism-specific groups tend to keep a strict routine since autistic people often have difficulty with routine changes.



Gammeldans
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18 Nov 2022, 2:58 am

ilovepalmtrees wrote:
My guess would be autism-specific groups tend to keep a strict routine since autistic people often have difficulty with routine changes.

What is a stric routine?