Has anyone done the Arrowsmith clock reading exercises?

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LeafyGenes
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04 Oct 2023, 6:31 pm

I am just having a go at improving my clock reading speed to see if it helps my self-diagnosed dyspraxia. I am using a three-handed interactive clock I found online, writing the time I think it says, and then checking the digital answer.

Has anyone done the Arrowsmith school clock exercises? Maybe with the extra hands?


_________________
Self-diagnosed with dyspraxia which has messed up my social life, my family, my work, and my home for a long time. I am ready for it to leave.

"From there to there, from here to there, funny things are everywhere!" Dr Suess, One Fish, Two Fish


GreenVelvetWorm
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04 Oct 2023, 8:16 pm

Is trouble reading analog clocks related to autism? It was one of the few things I struggled with in elementary school, and I still take a long time to decipher them even now



LeafyGenes
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05 Oct 2023, 2:01 am

I don't know if it's an autistic thing, it may be. I do have a relative diagnosed with autism and dyspraxia, and who had a very hard time reading analog clocks. I read that autism and dyspraxia are intertwined but half what I read online is false, I just don't know which half. I don't really think my relative has autism, but I'd say they definitely have dyspraxia.

I am reading about autism, dyspraxia, and alexithymia. Each seems to be able to exist alone, but they very often go together. It's so confusing. What I see at the moment is that dyspraxia is enough to cause all my problems by itself, even social ones, and there is no need to go looking for another cause. I have always been relatively clumsy and uncoordinated even though my fine motor skills are good and, like you, I had no trouble in school (except for sports)

I do notice that when I look at an analog clock out of context, for example I just woke up from a nap, it's very hard to read it. Do you get that too?




GreenVelvetWorm wrote:
Is trouble reading analog clocks related to autism? It was one of the few things I struggled with in elementary school, and I still take a long time to decipher them even now


_________________
Self-diagnosed with dyspraxia which has messed up my social life, my family, my work, and my home for a long time. I am ready for it to leave.

"From there to there, from here to there, funny things are everywhere!" Dr Suess, One Fish, Two Fish


naturalplastic
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05 Oct 2023, 2:56 am

Sounds more like a dyslexic thing than an autistic thing.



LeafyGenes
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05 Oct 2023, 3:00 am

I think dyslexia might be a symptom of dyspraxia. I guess it isn't surprising that it's confusing :p


_________________
Self-diagnosed with dyspraxia which has messed up my social life, my family, my work, and my home for a long time. I am ready for it to leave.

"From there to there, from here to there, funny things are everywhere!" Dr Suess, One Fish, Two Fish


Huckleberry Finn
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05 Oct 2023, 4:01 am

LeafyGenes wrote:
I am just having a go at improving my clock reading speed to see if it helps my self-diagnosed dyspraxia. I am using a three-handed interactive clock I found online, writing the time I think it says, and then checking the digital answer.

Has anyone done the Arrowsmith school clock exercises? Maybe with the extra hands?


Many diagnoses are really similar.

You can use some online self-diagnostic tests.
They are valid.

But the medical diagnosis made by competent doctors is essential.


This concerns autism specifically because some peculiarities accompany it.

Or is it just those and not autism.

Or you have both.

Yes, it's true, a lot that you will find on the Web contradicts itself.

I waited 8 years for a diagnosis from scientific researchers.

Previously I had one from 2012 that I didn't consider even if the person was a Court Expert and a head doctor.

So imagine: test to understand for yourself what I was.

Ok: they are reliable.

But they are not diagnoses.


Each diagnosis is based on scientific studies, and these are then taken up in the ICDs and DSMs.

Many syndromes are confusing, and many things written are wrong.

They are because they are based on concepts that have influenced research and research has been affected.

The lack of Theory of Mind is a key concept.

Even if in other studies this is not conclusive.

Just one example.

<>
Many diagnoses can be confused if not well practiced (increase in cases also for this reason).

In many situations the problems you describe may exist on their own.

In others together with autism.

And it is heterogeneous.
Then the new studies contradict the old ones.

And the diagnostic manuals are based on the old ones.
That they have to use those studies.

But the manuals are based on certainties of research.
Except that those were old certainties.

And the manuals come out with a lot of medical processing time.

Now on research that changes, it undermines the nosography itself.

There are many definitions because those taken for granted and unambiguous are actually fluctuating and change with the time of new scientific research.

Now we go to genetics and neuroimaging, there are no biomarkers.

And on some studies from 70 years ago.

But also from over 42 years ago.

The latest ICD and DSM versions (2013 certainly can't be recent honestly), flatten the concepts and simplify them too much.

Now studies after these concepts still demonstrate important differences.

Except that to be validated in a manual the studies must converge.

And when they converge too much, we could encounter a trivialization error

<>
The human mind tends to give simple answers to problems that are not simple at all.

Especially among some syndromes.

It simplifies too much.

And this makes autism similar to other problems.

If we did not do so, we would find substantial differences, but we do not include them because it is easier to find simplistic definitions.


Many things you described may be independent, related, and may not be diagnostic.

They can mix with other diagnoses.

A scientific researcher contact of mine has always told me that research must find every detail to go against the basic ideas that one would like to demonstrate.
Otherwise it is not a search, but just a way to arrive at a pre-established concept.

It can also be done unintentionally.
Much of what is published is affected.


<>

Difficulty reading an analog clock is common among autistic people.

In my case I read that watch in early childhood.

So would I really be weird?
no.

The point is that the actual problem exists, but not everyone has it.

There is dyscalculia, dystorography, dyspraxia.
Alexithymia, but these problems also have life without autism including ADHD.

I have autism and two diagnoses that are based on DSM 4 and DSM5.

In the fifth the concept is trivialized.

It simplifies.

Simplifying is the huge mistake.

Wrong nososgraphies are created.

A 1,2, 3 reasoning is made.

Which is very nice and simple.

But it can't be like that.
Too trivialized.

Asperger syndrome is placed as a subcategory in HFA...

Studies after the DSM 5 show that this is not the case.

*Some (few) do not decide and have aligned themselves with DSM 5.

Now the question is: are studies carried out to confirm or to refute? if to substantiate ... studies are of no use at all.

If to refute the thinking is fundamentally wrong.

If the only way to understand is to carry out complex studies that do not simplify, if you want to include valid criteria in the DSM and ICD these cannot be 1, 2, 3.

But they have to be complex.

<>
Many scientific researches tend to be uniform.

Others who decide, however, are not listened to, and are then given simplistic manuals, which in autism cannot be.


The doctor uses manuals, the tests are based on those, everything is trivialized.

Many diagnoses are nondifferential.

It only increases the number of diagnoses.

I'll give you an example.
I am Asperger.

Previously the worldwide percentage was 0.7%, now it is so high that it is enormous.

Too many autism diagnoses.

It's okay to diagnose yourself more.

But it's not good to make too many wrong diagnoses.

However, the risk of the latest DSM (trivializing everything) is that of denying therapies to those with real problems.

One of the risks.

Or to make the positive characteristics appear instead of the negative ones, hence the danger of non-therapy.

<>

Autism has not been understood since 1887, a British scientist highlighted it already then.
But then it was forgotten. In 1916 the same thing was done by others, in 1926 a Russian neurologist took it to task.

In 1943 kanner and Asperger took it to the top.
It was put on hold until Lorna Wing 1981.

Then after the 1994 Apa.

Then this indifferent DSM and the almost mirror-like ICD.

Is it possible that in 144 years it has not been understood exactly nosographically?

<>

I fall within the clinical framework, but I am based on researchers with many publications, especially in the USA.

Who did research with colleagues from the USA and other countries.

What matters is getting out of the impasse of the superficial and trivializing diagnosis.

Otherwise we won't take a single step forward, ever.

<>

I am alexithymic, I have adult ADHD, two DSM4 and DSM5 memberships, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression, I am avoidant, I don't realize if what I say interests others, I don't realize if what others communicate is accurate non-verbally or if not clear evidently, therefore well outlined.

I have more.

But all this could very well live on its own.
Without autism.

I have stellar test scores.

I'm ND (which also includes something else that needs to be said; ND = autism is wrong, also autism).

<>
Many scientific researches tend to be uniform.

Others who decide, however, are not listened to, and are then given simplistic manuals, which in autism cannot be.


The doctor uses manuals, the tests are based on those, everything is trivialized.

Many diagnoses are nondifferential.

It only increases the number of diagnoses.

I'll give you an example.
I am Apserger.

Previously the worldwide percentage was 0.7%, now it is so high that it is enormous.

Too many autism diagnoses.

It's okay to diagnose yourself more.

But it's not good to make too many wrong diagnoses.

However, the risk of the latest DSM (trivializing everything) is that of denying therapies to those with real problems.

One of the risks.

Or to make the positive characteristics appear instead of the negative ones, hence the danger of non-therapy.

<>



I am alexithymic, I have adult ADHD, two DSM4 and DSM5 memberships, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression, I am avoidant, I don't realize if what I say interests others, I don't realize if what others communicate is accurate non-verbally or if not clear evidently, therefore well outlined.

I have more.

But all this could very well live on its own.
Without autism.

I have stellar test scores.

I'm ND (which also includes something else that needs to be said; ND = autism is wrong, also autism).

<>

I am Gifted.

I think in images
.
I have sensory issues.
I'm neotenic.

I don't function socially.

Even if I can do things that others can't even think of.

I have a lot of deficits.

We are not geniuses or we just aren't.

We are messed up people.


If I didn't have any inconveniences I would have gotten several degrees.

Please take them.

But I start and then after a while I change my course of studies.

I am a collector of information on events, statistics, data.

I calculate over 1 million.

What do I need them for?

Um!

<>

I even study NT behaviors to understand how to do it, sometimes I do it better than them.

Others are impossible for me.

<>

Years ago I responded to a specialist on the web.

He wrote about social phobia.

Everyone complimented each other, I asked him a question on how to reconcile between social phobia and avoidant disorder of personalities that seem almost overlapping.

But one is anxiety, the other changes cluster to which it belongs.

One is cured, the other would be like changing your DNA by washing it.

Then I gave him another 12 differentiations.

He (only he) replied that my question was somewhat interesting.

And that he would give me an answer because the question was too complex.

I have been waiting for several years for it to do so.

But I consider it highly unlikely!

And he also knows why.

It simplified and trivialized everything into one thing.

I proposed many different ones to him.

He went into crisis.

And in answering he would be wrong.

I don't write this to be right.

I write this to try to understand.

No autistic person wants to be right, but to understand yes.


_________________
Forests precede civilizations, deserts follow.
(Chateaubriand)


LeafyGenes
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

Joined: 1 Dec 2022
Gender: Female
Posts: 47

09 Oct 2023, 2:52 am

Huckleberry thank you I agree with you there. It sounds like you have put a lot of thought into it, maybe, like me, you have been granted a lot of time to think.


Huckleberry Finn wrote:
LeafyGenes wrote:
I am just having a go at improving my clock reading speed to see if it helps my self-diagnosed dyspraxia. I am using a three-handed interactive clock I found online, writing the time I think it says, and then checking the digital answer.

Has anyone done the Arrowsmith school clock exercises? Maybe with the extra hands?


Many diagnoses are really similar.

You can use some online self-diagnostic tests.
They are valid.

But the medical diagnosis made by competent doctors is essential.


This concerns autism specifically because some peculiarities accompany it.

Or is it just those and not autism.

Or you have both.

Yes, it's true, a lot that you will find on the Web contradicts itself.

I waited 8 years for a diagnosis from scientific researchers.

Previously I had one from 2012 that I didn't consider even if the person was a Court Expert and a head doctor.

So imagine: test to understand for yourself what I was.

Ok: they are reliable.

But they are not diagnoses.


Each diagnosis is based on scientific studies, and these are then taken up in the ICDs and DSMs.

Many syndromes are confusing, and many things written are wrong.

They are because they are based on concepts that have influenced research and research has been affected.

The lack of Theory of Mind is a key concept.

Even if in other studies this is not conclusive.

Just one example.

<>
Many diagnoses can be confused if not well practiced (increase in cases also for this reason).

In many situations the problems you describe may exist on their own.

In others together with autism.

And it is heterogeneous.
Then the new studies contradict the old ones.

And the diagnostic manuals are based on the old ones.
That they have to use those studies.

But the manuals are based on certainties of research.
Except that those were old certainties.

And the manuals come out with a lot of medical processing time.

Now on research that changes, it undermines the nosography itself.

There are many definitions because those taken for granted and unambiguous are actually fluctuating and change with the time of new scientific research.

Now we go to genetics and neuroimaging, there are no biomarkers.

And on some studies from 70 years ago.

But also from over 42 years ago.

The latest ICD and DSM versions (2013 certainly can't be recent honestly), flatten the concepts and simplify them too much.

Now studies after these concepts still demonstrate important differences.

Except that to be validated in a manual the studies must converge.

And when they converge too much, we could encounter a trivialization error

<>
The human mind tends to give simple answers to problems that are not simple at all.

Especially among some syndromes.

It simplifies too much.

And this makes autism similar to other problems.

If we did not do so, we would find substantial differences, but we do not include them because it is easier to find simplistic definitions.


Many things you described may be independent, related, and may not be diagnostic.

They can mix with other diagnoses.

A scientific researcher contact of mine has always told me that research must find every detail to go against the basic ideas that one would like to demonstrate.
Otherwise it is not a search, but just a way to arrive at a pre-established concept.

It can also be done unintentionally.
Much of what is published is affected.


<>

Difficulty reading an analog clock is common among autistic people.

In my case I read that watch in early childhood.

So would I really be weird?
no.

The point is that the actual problem exists, but not everyone has it.

There is dyscalculia, dystorography, dyspraxia.
Alexithymia, but these problems also have life without autism including ADHD.

I have autism and two diagnoses that are based on DSM 4 and DSM5.

In the fifth the concept is trivialized.

It simplifies.

Simplifying is the huge mistake.

Wrong nososgraphies are created.

A 1,2, 3 reasoning is made.

Which is very nice and simple.

But it can't be like that.
Too trivialized.

Asperger syndrome is placed as a subcategory in HFA...

Studies after the DSM 5 show that this is not the case.

*Some (few) do not decide and have aligned themselves with DSM 5.

Now the question is: are studies carried out to confirm or to refute? if to substantiate ... studies are of no use at all.

If to refute the thinking is fundamentally wrong.

If the only way to understand is to carry out complex studies that do not simplify, if you want to include valid criteria in the DSM and ICD these cannot be 1, 2, 3.

But they have to be complex.

<>
Many scientific researches tend to be uniform.

Others who decide, however, are not listened to, and are then given simplistic manuals, which in autism cannot be.


The doctor uses manuals, the tests are based on those, everything is trivialized.

Many diagnoses are nondifferential.

It only increases the number of diagnoses.

I'll give you an example.
I am Asperger.

Previously the worldwide percentage was 0.7%, now it is so high that it is enormous.

Too many autism diagnoses.

It's okay to diagnose yourself more.

But it's not good to make too many wrong diagnoses.

However, the risk of the latest DSM (trivializing everything) is that of denying therapies to those with real problems.

One of the risks.

Or to make the positive characteristics appear instead of the negative ones, hence the danger of non-therapy.

<>

Autism has not been understood since 1887, a British scientist highlighted it already then.
But then it was forgotten. In 1916 the same thing was done by others, in 1926 a Russian neurologist took it to task.

In 1943 kanner and Asperger took it to the top.
It was put on hold until Lorna Wing 1981.

Then after the 1994 Apa.

Then this indifferent DSM and the almost mirror-like ICD.

Is it possible that in 144 years it has not been understood exactly nosographically?

<>

I fall within the clinical framework, but I am based on researchers with many publications, especially in the USA.

Who did research with colleagues from the USA and other countries.

What matters is getting out of the impasse of the superficial and trivializing diagnosis.

Otherwise we won't take a single step forward, ever.

<>

I am alexithymic, I have adult ADHD, two DSM4 and DSM5 memberships, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression, I am avoidant, I don't realize if what I say interests others, I don't realize if what others communicate is accurate non-verbally or if not clear evidently, therefore well outlined.

I have more.

But all this could very well live on its own.
Without autism.

I have stellar test scores.

I'm ND (which also includes something else that needs to be said; ND = autism is wrong, also autism).

<>
Many scientific researches tend to be uniform.

Others who decide, however, are not listened to, and are then given simplistic manuals, which in autism cannot be.


The doctor uses manuals, the tests are based on those, everything is trivialized.

Many diagnoses are nondifferential.

It only increases the number of diagnoses.

I'll give you an example.
I am Apserger.

Previously the worldwide percentage was 0.7%, now it is so high that it is enormous.

Too many autism diagnoses.

It's okay to diagnose yourself more.

But it's not good to make too many wrong diagnoses.

However, the risk of the latest DSM (trivializing everything) is that of denying therapies to those with real problems.

One of the risks.

Or to make the positive characteristics appear instead of the negative ones, hence the danger of non-therapy.

<>



I am alexithymic, I have adult ADHD, two DSM4 and DSM5 memberships, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression, I am avoidant, I don't realize if what I say interests others, I don't realize if what others communicate is accurate non-verbally or if not clear evidently, therefore well outlined.

I have more.

But all this could very well live on its own.
Without autism.

I have stellar test scores.

I'm ND (which also includes something else that needs to be said; ND = autism is wrong, also autism).

<>

I am Gifted.

I think in images
.
I have sensory issues.
I'm neotenic.

I don't function socially.

Even if I can do things that others can't even think of.

I have a lot of deficits.

We are not geniuses or we just aren't.

We are messed up people.


If I didn't have any inconveniences I would have gotten several degrees.

Please take them.

But I start and then after a while I change my course of studies.

I am a collector of information on events, statistics, data.

I calculate over 1 million.

What do I need them for?

Um!

<>

I even study NT behaviors to understand how to do it, sometimes I do it better than them.

Others are impossible for me.

<>

Years ago I responded to a specialist on the web.

He wrote about social phobia.

Everyone complimented each other, I asked him a question on how to reconcile between social phobia and avoidant disorder of personalities that seem almost overlapping.

But one is anxiety, the other changes cluster to which it belongs.

One is cured, the other would be like changing your DNA by washing it.

Then I gave him another 12 differentiations.

He (only he) replied that my question was somewhat interesting.

And that he would give me an answer because the question was too complex.

I have been waiting for several years for it to do so.

But I consider it highly unlikely!

And he also knows why.

It simplified and trivialized everything into one thing.

I proposed many different ones to him.

He went into crisis.

And in answering he would be wrong.

I don't write this to be right.

I write this to try to understand.

No autistic person wants to be right, but to understand yes.


_________________
Self-diagnosed with dyspraxia which has messed up my social life, my family, my work, and my home for a long time. I am ready for it to leave.

"From there to there, from here to there, funny things are everywhere!" Dr Suess, One Fish, Two Fish


Huckleberry Finn
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

Joined: 8 Sep 2023
Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 466

11 Oct 2023, 4:44 pm

Hi, sorry for the late reply, but I didn't know what to say.

You know, more than anything else having an initially wrong diagnosis, I was able to think of hundreds of whys.


And make assumptions.
<>

Strengthened by having met intellectually valid people.

<>

I was the first one to try to disprove my intuitions.


You know, until the year of diagnosis by scientific researchers I never wrote in the forums that I had Asperger's but probably yes, but without the actual diagnosis.


While all the other Aspergers in the groups in Italy recognized me as similar to them.

But this was already in 2010.

Even in the self-evaluation tests the scores were very high.

In Italy we have scientific research that collaborates closely with that of the USA and beyond.

So the level is absolute.

While in the diagnostic and therapeutic reality, but also in university teaching, it turns out to be very bad.

*Very often even Italian doctors think they are better than anyone.

I once wrote in a medical forum that things should always be supported with valid demonstrations.

Not with self-referential thoughts and that's it.

Then they also had to explain to me why so few Nobel prizes for medicine are "won" in Italy.

While in the USA, perhaps there is no year in which this does not happen.

That is: it is clear that theirs were just words.


In fact, our researchers escape from Italy and go everywhere in the world.

Imagine having people with superior intelligences.


And higher education than anyone.

And minds capable of finding unusual solutions and ideas.


We spend 1 million dollars (per person) to train these people.

Then the Italian medical and research system is governed by figures who prevent very gifted people from carrying out research.

The result can then be seen.


This response is very critical of our medical system.

But it's the truth.

What happens.

Sorry, I don't know if I answered adequately or digressed within the answer itself.

You know, those who pay the price are the people who don't have a valid diagnosis.

Or they only have it in adulthood, when it is needed but little, really little.


Ok, I'll change what I can in myself.

But I didn't have the huge chances that I could have had if they had done things right from the start.


<>

Ask for help on how to succeed.

While I didn't give it to you instead.


Draw by hand.

You put in the numbers.

Think about how any hands fit together in the analog.
<>

Imagine being small and being able to stay inside and do whatever you want, move the hands back and forth, orient yourself.

I thought the passage of time was an imposition.

While by doing so that imposition would become non-existent


You would act on the mechanism and vary it as you like, until you learn.


Never be afraid of making mistakes.


Because I always say one thing: only those who don't test themselves never make mistakes.


But if he doesn't practice he will never learn.

So whoever doesn't give up wins in the end.

It doesn't matter when: consider having a timeless watch at your disposal.


_________________
Forests precede civilizations, deserts follow.
(Chateaubriand)


Edna3362
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11 Oct 2023, 5:16 pm

More of a learning disability thing than an autistic thing.
Definitely, dyspraxia has issues related with visual spatial learning and processing.

It's kinda like there are those who struggled with left and right, that they need to see which back of their hands forms the letter L.


I never struggled with analog clocks.
Heck, I even use analog clock hands as some form of bullet journalling symbol to signify the general time.

To many, it just look like some weird random lines and angles dancing around the pages.



As for self diagnosis thing...

I'm not sure if I have a form of language processing issue, but I had special interests, obsessions and habits that counteracts that.

It only shows as lower than average verbal IQ in assessment. Yet my performance in real life and grades says otherwise.

On the other hand, processing language always feels unnatural to me. Like I'm translating several layers each time I read, write, hear or speak.

Still, mine is getting a bit worse despite the daily practice due to the following;

Well, there's something wrong with me that autism alone cannot explain.
Most people, even professionals think it's the autism, it's not. It's somewhere deep yet acquired, more of a software thing than my neurology, that I can't even see that other autistics relate.

I can't simply have more tests because it's expensive. Whatever it is, it's stealing my internal resources.
Burnouts can't explain it. Regression between burnouts can't explain it.

Never able to have a test for that -- it's resembling like ADHD and BPD, and somewhat getting worse by the year. The worst part is that it was inconsistent, then getting more frequent every year.

But I refuse to think that it's some co-occuring thing in my case.
It might be a physical or biological health thing than neurological or a head thing but whatever it is, it's affecting it.

Because I hadn't done everything to rule that out yet; my diet, hormones, habits, sleep, breathing and allergies, etc.

Which already taken years to play catch up, losing layers of problems one by one. Each can take several months and years each.
At the same time, that unnamed something else is gradually and slowly stealing my life from me since puberty.


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Huckleberry Finn
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Gender: Non-binary
Posts: 466

11 Oct 2023, 7:14 pm

What you write is interesting: I'm going back, now it's very late here and I can't write as I would like (I could).

I've never had any problems with reading watches either, nor with tying my shoe laces for example.

The autistic spectrum is very broad.

It includes a lot in itself.

Even comorbidity, it is almost never pure and alone.

I have skills in inverting images, for example the first time I used a Personal...

I turned it on and off.
Then turned it back on.

I didn't understand what the hell to use, there was a contemporary factor in me.
I am ambidextrous (I would almost say with a pro-right margin between 1% and 5%).

I flipped the Personal over to see which hand I was faster with.

Using it the other way around is not easy.

You need to understand where the pointer is going.

I understood it quickly.

The right hand went a little faster, I put it back the right way and used the right hand and from there I started writing faster and faster.

Always better.

<>

ou write about language processing, in the absence of brain lesions, and as a person with autism, you would fall under the DSM 4 diagnosis.

That is: Asperger's.
From what you write you have a high IQ.
I have always had very high grades too.

<>
The shortcomings were in many sectors, therefore in the imaginative, which I resolved quickly, I have no fantasy at all, and I am dysgraphic.

It's been getting worse in recent years, maybe I know why.

Deficit in Theory of Mind: although there are some reviews in this scientific evaluation.

So let's imagine that a cardinal rule of diagnosis can be questioned.

I read something about it, but now I can't find it right away.

Non-rational empathy was zero: rational empathy was high: but I have to understand first.

I've always had sensory problems.

I compare a little with anyone who writes or reads the posts.

<>
Dipraxia yes, relating to the coordination of body movement, which is also in contrast with a sentence I wrote before.


But as I move, I imagine myself walking on the beats of an out-of-tune piano.

You define something that I understand: ADHD as an adult interferes.

But ADHD can also exist on its own.

As well as other problems.

Being borderline can coexist with autism.

However, I understand what you mean.

Worse, but you can't believe it's just autism, worse in something that you were previously able to limit.

However, worsening may be a secondary effect on memories.

Anterograde.


And if you don't take drugs I don't have the explanation now.

I take a molecule 20 times more powerful than valium.

This is to succeed socially

I tell you: I have ten times less skill than before.


Even of memory.

YES something is influencing it: we need to understand what it is.

Because that's the answer.

Regarding verbal IQs, perhaps brain areas are involved in the assessments.
From how you describe in some passages you seem synaesthetic.

your assessment may indicate something that is impacting and not alongside autism, but is something other than autism.


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Sorry, I didn't understand the final two sentences of your post, but it's my fault, English is not my language, and I wanted to learn it very well, but my mother had just died, and the girl who was a native English speaker was surprised at my request because it didn't seem like the right time.

I only took a few lessons.

But I gave up: she was right.

I am also alexithymic so I struggle enormously to understand emotions, some I don't feel. Even if in theory we should all feel the primary ones, unless we have pathologies in this regard and I don't have any.

I know I have skills but they are not the same as pre Covid.

And pre vaccinations above all.

A friend mentioned to me that I suffered TIA and in fact half my body was paralyzed months ago.

I don't know how long it lasted.

It was almost night.

I crawled into bed.

Then in the morning he was fine.

I usually never react by losing my temper.

And so I did then too.

*If there is no functional damage, if it is not attributable to drugs, and to other things that you may have written about, but I have no understanding (sorry), but for now I have no way of giving you input to outline what happens.

Something happens to me too.

My doctor told me that with only 1 eighth of my medication I would be in crisis.

I take double the established dosage which in itself is already high.

The only element you describe that is incisive is the hormones, which really do have an impact.


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Forests precede civilizations, deserts follow.
(Chateaubriand)