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nick007
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05 Jan 2024, 4:36 pm

Covid is still in the news some here & some people in my area still wear masks but masks are optional & most people don't wear them. Masks might be required in hospitals & doc offices if your sick with Covid or certain other illnesses. Covid is still being used as an excuse for various things. Some corporations & political type people think Covid is their perfect scapegoat. I'm sure Covid really is still causing some problems & negatively impacting people & society in various ways but the worst is the way various people & groups have been reacting to Covid & some still are acting like it's dog eat dog & blaming & fighting instead of actually trying to work together & help each other :evil:

As for as what I think about how much the OP or anyone should worry about Covid directly is a very situational thing. It should be taken a lot more seriously if you or someone in your household has very serious health issues that would make catching Covid a lot more dangerous or you live in an area with very restricted health care access & higher infection rates. that said I also strongly believe that people should be allowed the freedom of choice to make their own personal health decisions so if your really worried about getting sick I believe you should be allowed to wear masks & practice social distancing without being bullied for it but on the flipside you also should not bully others for choosing to socialise without wearing masks. AKA you should decide for yourself how you'll respond or not respond to Covid.


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lostonearth35
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05 Jan 2024, 5:03 pm

As far as the media is concerned, if you develop so much as a sniffle you should consult a mortician immediately. I'm so "sick" of their constant fear-mongering.

My nose often runs even when the rest of me feels normal, especially in the winter, so I should have died about 4 years ago. :skull:



nick007
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06 Jan 2024, 1:59 am

lostonearth35 wrote:
As far as the media is concerned, if you develop so much as a sniffle you should consult a mortician immediately. I'm so "sick" of their constant fear-mongering.

My nose often runs even when the rest of me feels normal, especially in the winter, so I should have died about 4 years ago. :skull:
I notice that with the media as well.

My nose runs a lot sometimes due to chronic allergy & sinus problems. Is that the cause for you? Going inside from outside during winter sometimes makes my nose run a bit too. I think that's kinda common but not sure why or what could be done other than the sinus & allergy treatments which do not help me enough. I weaned myself off of Prednisolone after being on it for years for skin eczema & it also helped my sinus allergy issues at first. However I built up a tolerance after a while & it quit helping. I'm trying to get Dupixent prescribed, doc is willing but insurance requires prior authorization due to the insane cost(if I owned a pharmacy company I'd be one f#ckin rich b@stard). If I cant get that I'll pursue the old-school immunosuppressants.


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elotepreparado
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06 Feb 2024, 3:48 pm

People in my area almost completely stopped wearing masks. Even now that COVID cases are up again.

I got COVID twice this year and influenza B once. Horrible illnesses and I had high fever for days each time. Very painful. Now I have asthma.

edit: but I was always sensitive to colds and influenza growing up. This just made me extra vulnerable to COVID. I used to have asthma react only to allergies but now I have it react to any strong emotions or laughing or fear or exercise.



What_in_the_what_now
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02 Mar 2024, 8:54 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
It never stopped being a thing where I am. I still see masks and they're still necessary in certain places. Earlier today I was given a few more boxes of free tests at the chemist.


The most important thing is to wash your hands and wash / wipe anything that changes hands. Stand behind people whenever possible instead of in front of them.


are you UK?



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02 Mar 2024, 8:57 am

The last news I heard that people should start getting vaccinated for MAGA. It seems older americans are infected at a much higher rate. Repeated infections can make one's thinking erratic; also delusional. It is also known as the whiney bxxch syndrome



What_in_the_what_now
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02 Mar 2024, 10:48 am

renaeden wrote:
Covid is still making its rounds here. Just last week I was at the physiotherapist and heard that three people cancelled their appointments that day because they'd caught Covid. I've been very lucky not to have had it. Practically everyone I know - family, people I know at work - have had it. Some people have even had it twice.

I wash and sanitise my hands a lot and keep my distance from people when out and about.


Assuming they weren't too ill to attend, I do wonder when it will become similar to rhinovirus.

Most NHS staff are no longer required to test clear to be in work as long as well enough.



What_in_the_what_now
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02 Mar 2024, 11:02 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
It was a nightmare during peak Covid trying to take as many precautions as humanly possible to keep them both alive.


Was that the medical advice that if they were to contract, they'd die? :(



What_in_the_what_now
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02 Mar 2024, 11:03 am

blueroses wrote:
IsabellaLinton wrote:
I'm very sorry to hear that, blueroses. It sounds like you had a rough go. My daughter and daughter-in-law are both very immunocompromised too. It was a nightmare during peak Covid trying to take as many precautions as humanly possible to keep them both alive. In addition my mother had cancer so we couldn't visit her house at all, with the risk of any transmission.

I don't think many people understand unless they've experienced the fear of losing someone they love, or losing their own life, because of extenuating medical complications.


I'm sorry to hear that and, yes, I think there's truth what you're saying. I was lucky personally in that I wasn't diagnosed with my health issues until late 2021 when vaccines were available, even if they haven't turned out to be the panacea I think some people were hoping for. Throughout the worst parts of the pandemic I dated a frontline health care worker who was also helping to care for his father with late-stage cancer, though.

He was working 12 hour shifts in an Emergency Room taking x-rays of patients with Covid pneumonia one after the other, then would come home, go through a whole elaborate ritual of showering and disinfecting himself and then immediately head over to his parents' house to drive his dad to chemo. At that time, there was a shortage of PPE here in the US, too, so he had to be really meticulous about taking care of the equipment he was issued because if a strap on a mask broke or something, he would be out of luck until more was available. Looking back, I don't know how he dealt with that stress and the fear of infecting his dad, with whom he was very close, for over a year. He seemed to compartmentalize a lot of it and developed a fair amount of denial as a coping mechanism, I guess just to be able to keep going.

I try to think of that when I go to hospitals or doctors' offices now and find it hard to understand why none of the healthcare workers or caregivers accompanying patients are masking. Really, it's just hard to live that way for a long time and I think there's a lot of collective trauma driving decision-making at this stage of the pandemic. Not just decision-making by individuals, but by institutions also.


and now he's your husband hero! :lol:



What_in_the_what_now
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02 Mar 2024, 11:06 am

elotepreparado wrote:
People in my area almost completely stopped wearing masks. Even now that COVID cases are up again.

I got COVID twice this year and influenza B once. Horrible illnesses and I had high fever for days each time. Very painful. Now I have asthma.

edit: but I was always sensitive to colds and influenza growing up. This just made me extra vulnerable to COVID. I used to have asthma react only to allergies but now I have it react to any strong emotions or laughing or fear or exercise.


How did you know which flu you had? did they test you specifically?



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03 Mar 2024, 10:25 am

COVID is definitely still at thing! I got COVID back in November 2023 (Northeast USA). I will say this time (I also had it back in early 2022) has given me a little bit long COVID with an increased heart rate and has made my memory a little worse. I do not recommend. I miss my caffeine drink. :cry:


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blueroses
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03 Mar 2024, 9:31 pm

What_in_the_what_now wrote:
blueroses wrote:
IsabellaLinton wrote:
I'm very sorry to hear that, blueroses. It sounds like you had a rough go. My daughter and daughter-in-law are both very immunocompromised too. It was a nightmare during peak Covid trying to take as many precautions as humanly possible to keep them both alive. In addition my mother had cancer so we couldn't visit her house at all, with the risk of any transmission.

I don't think many people understand unless they've experienced the fear of losing someone they love, or losing their own life, because of extenuating medical complications.


I'm sorry to hear that and, yes, I think there's truth what you're saying. I was lucky personally in that I wasn't diagnosed with my health issues until late 2021 when vaccines were available, even if they haven't turned out to be the panacea I think some people were hoping for. Throughout the worst parts of the pandemic I dated a frontline health care worker who was also helping to care for his father with late-stage cancer, though.

He was working 12 hour shifts in an Emergency Room taking x-rays of patients with Covid pneumonia one after the other, then would come home, go through a whole elaborate ritual of showering and disinfecting himself and then immediately head over to his parents' house to drive his dad to chemo. At that time, there was a shortage of PPE here in the US, too, so he had to be really meticulous about taking care of the equipment he was issued because if a strap on a mask broke or something, he would be out of luck until more was available. Looking back, I don't know how he dealt with that stress and the fear of infecting his dad, with whom he was very close, for over a year. He seemed to compartmentalize a lot of it and developed a fair amount of denial as a coping mechanism, I guess just to be able to keep going.

I try to think of that when I go to hospitals or doctors' offices now and find it hard to understand why none of the healthcare workers or caregivers accompanying patients are masking. Really, it's just hard to live that way for a long time and I think there's a lot of collective trauma driving decision-making at this stage of the pandemic. Not just decision-making by individuals, but by institutions also.


and now he's your husband hero! :lol:


If so, that's news to me. :)