What was life really like in the late 60s?

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MaxE
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17 Jan 2024, 6:12 am

Fnord wrote:
Eyeselation wrote:
Here’s an expression from the 60’s you don’t hear much anymore. At least not in the context it was first meant. “Love it or Leave it” favorite saying of white supremacists.
Actually . . .

The phrase "America; Love It or Leave It" was directed at those who protested against the Vietnam war, the Draft, the Military-Industrial Complex, the Establishment, Police Brutality, Segregation by Race, and laws prohibiting the free use of illegal drugs.  These protesters were labeled as hating America by Conservatives and Traditionalists.  Thus they were being told to either change their attitudes or get the hell out of the country.

It was not just about race, but a host of other issues plaguing America.

When you think about it though, when white men faced the possibility of being drafted to die in Vietnam, protest was "fashionable" and the concerns of black activists took a back seat. Once the threat of the draft went away, very few whites were politically active. Blacks were on their own, many marginalized by the press as dangerous "militants".

Sorry to learn of white privilege raising its ugly head on WP.


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ASPartOfMe
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17 Jan 2024, 8:00 am

MaxE wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Eyeselation wrote:
Here’s an expression from the 60’s you don’t hear much anymore. At least not in the context it was first meant. “Love it or Leave it” favorite saying of white supremacists.
Actually . . .

The phrase "America; Love It or Leave It" was directed at those who protested against the Vietnam war, the Draft, the Military-Industrial Complex, the Establishment, Police Brutality, Segregation by Race, and laws prohibiting the free use of illegal drugs.  These protesters were labeled as hating America by Conservatives and Traditionalists.  Thus they were being told to either change their attitudes or get the hell out of the country.

It was not just about race, but a host of other issues plaguing America.

When you think about it though, when white men faced the possibility of being drafted to die in Vietnam, protest was "fashionable" and the concerns of black activists took a back seat. Once the threat of the draft went away, very few whites were politically active. Blacks were on their own, many marginalized by the press as dangerous "militants".

Sorry to learn of white privilege raising its ugly head on WP.

How does “It was not just about race” translate into race was a non or even a minimal factor?. It was as more about class then race. Working class white people resenting white privileged college students and hippies. Conservative war supporters were more likely to be racist, no denying that.



I grew up in a neighborhood where those “hard hats” as well as firemen and cops lived. I clearly remember seeing that riot on the TV news that night as well as people saying “a good hippie is a dead hippie”.


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auntblabby
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18 Jan 2024, 2:44 pm

i just remember sitting in the back seat of the family's rambler ambassador station wagon and seeing my dad incensed at the sight of some hippies walking on the side of the road in spanaway park, and he rolled down his window and yelled "GET A HAIRCUT YOU GODDAMNED HIPPIES!!" and my mom and sister dropping down in their seats out of sheer embarrassment. :oops: i remember hearing a news blurb on the radio circa 1965 or so, about long-haired berkeley students smoking pot, and in my little 4 year old brain pictured long-haired people with pot handles hanging out of their mouths. i remember watching a monochrome image on tv, circa 1965, of petula clark singing her big hit "downtown." i remember the cars and their sauerkraut/lead-smelling un-controlled exhausts, big trucks belching black smoke competing with the ubiquitous smokestack industries downtown in tacoma (hence the term "the aroma of tacoma"), i remember seeing a purple mid-60s corvette parked outside a 7-11 store, the speedo seemed to have a ridiculous 160 miles per hour maximum marking on it. i remember my dad painting his 1953 GMC pickup barney-purple as that was the cheapest automotive paint available to him, and it was quite a sight on the roads even with the bright-colored detroit iron ubiquitous in those days. i remember the tv show "laugh-in" and how people talked about it the next morning in school, that is those people whose parents let them watch it as it was considered risque then. i remember people everywhere smoking cigarettes and the ever-present foul burnt smell all over the place, and nasty ashy ashtrays everywhere.