How do you stop over-analyzing situations?

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justanotherpersonsomewhere23124
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12 Mar 2024, 4:14 pm

It really seems to take a toll mentally.



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12 Mar 2024, 4:27 pm

Usually, I don't. :oops:
When I do shift into action it's often on impulse.


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bee33
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16 Mar 2024, 6:29 am

I'm not exactly sure what you mean. Do you think about it after the fact, like going over everything you said and did and wondering how you could have handled it differently?



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17 Mar 2024, 2:32 pm

How to stop over-analyzing situations? I wish I knew. According to some people I can't buy a tin of beans without planning it like it was a bank robbery.

I've made some headway by trying to consider whether I'd come to much harm if I was more glib about the thing I was going to do. I guess I've been known to buy that tin of beans without really thinking much about it, at least on a good day. But it seems my brain wiring gives me a tendency to analyse most things, so it's often a matter of fighting it. Luckily I sometimes start to feel tired of doing so much mental work (though my mental stamina is pretty strong with so much practice), and that gives me enough desire to rebel against the world of thinking from time to time. There's not a lot of sense in making easy things hard.

Mind you, I wouldn't be without the ability to meticulously analyse things. It might take a long time, but the quality of some of my results can be quite impressive, and if I didn't take such care, I expect I'd be making a lot of things that don't work properly. If the project is expensive, a lot of money can be wasted on materials etc., but thinking only costs time, and as I'm retired with only a moderate pension, I have more spare time than spare money. And I get a lot of satisfaction from doing a job intelligently and well, even if it doesn't have to be done well.



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17 Mar 2024, 10:00 pm

I don't because I can't. I analyze everything.


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18 Mar 2024, 11:17 am

Diversion

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18 Mar 2024, 12:03 pm

Is thar an autistic trait? Because I always used to that, not in all situations, only in those that I was extremely puzzled and overwhelmed with. I than start analizing everything in an obsessive way until my brain eventually explode. The only thing that could calm me down is walking so fast until I get too exausted to think about anything.


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18 Mar 2024, 3:20 pm

DazyDaisy wrote:
Is thar an autistic trait? Because I always used to that, not in all situations, only in those that I was extremely puzzled and overwhelmed with. I than start analizing everything in an obsessive way until my brain eventually explode. The only thing that could calm me down is walking so fast until I get too exausted to think about anything.

I guess it's the same with me, i.e. if a problem seems dead easy to solve, I just solve it. But a lot of problems don't seem dead easy. They can seem confusing at first glance, or I might just notice there are potential pitfalls. I remember reading in a book years ago that the way to solve problems is to start by collecting together all relevent information, so that's what I started doing for any problem that didn't look easy. For a long time I thought that if I hadn't read that book, I wouldn't do that, but I hadn't been diagnosed then. So I don't know if it's purely an ASD thing or not. I think the analysis thing is very often a feature of ASD, "little professors" and all that, but not in every case. So I guess that means there must be something else going on apart from ASD that makes many of us analytical. Maybe it's just a common coping strategy with people who happen to have a flair for analysing, and then they get rather obsessional about it just like a non-analytical Aspie might get obessional about something else?



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18 Mar 2024, 4:48 pm

ToughDiamond wrote:
DazyDaisy wrote:
Is thar an autistic trait? Because I always used to that, not in all situations, only in those that I was extremely puzzled and overwhelmed with. I than start analizing everything in an obsessive way until my brain eventually explode. The only thing that could calm me down is walking so fast until I get too exausted to think about anything.

I guess it's the same with me, i.e. if a problem seems dead easy to solve, I just solve it. But a lot of problems don't seem dead easy. They can seem confusing at first glance, or I might just notice there are potential pitfalls. I remember reading in a book years ago that the way to solve problems is to start by collecting together all relevent information, so that's what I started doing for any problem that didn't look easy. For a long time I thought that if I hadn't read that book, I wouldn't do that, but I hadn't been diagnosed then. So I don't know if it's purely an ASD thing or not. I think the analysis thing is very often a feature of ASD, "little professors" and all that, but not in every case. So I guess that means there must be something else going on apart from ASD that makes many of us analytical. Maybe it's just a common coping strategy with people who happen to have a flair for analysing, and then they get rather obsessional about it just like a non-analytical Aspie might get obessional about something else?


Thank you, really, for detailed explanation. Once I thought I'm "normal", just a little bit of an introvert. Well, an anxious introvert. Well, anxious introvert with PTSD. Actually CPTSD. Than I realized I'm the most probably autistic. Now I wonder how "normal" I am at least and if I also have obsessive compulsive disorder, ADHD and God knows what else :lol:

As for solving problems I find that challenging, but in personal relationships my minds are going crazy with overanalyzing. Otherwise, I think I would make a great detective/investigator with my analysing skills :).

Great that you are successfully utilizing what you red in that book. Some people may read it hundred times and yet forget it when they need it.

Well, yes. If it is an autistic trait in the end, actually sometimes it can turn into a skill. At least, that means that autism also comes with some gifts, too.


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20 Mar 2024, 3:25 pm

I try to distract myself and think about something less stressful



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22 Mar 2024, 3:59 am

Dr. Camilla Pang in Explaining Humans talks about Bayes' theorem.

It's a formula for working out the probability of interlinked events. I won't do a maths infodump here, but basically you can reduce an unpredictable human situation into a logic problem, i.e. turn 'What is going to happen?' into 'There is an X percent chance of this happening'.

The really good news is that you don't have to know anything about maths to make this work on principle, i.e. it doesn't matter if you get the figures completely wrong - the point is that you get a figure on it at all, instead of the situation just being a chaos of unknowns. For me it has worked wonders in resting my brain.



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22 Mar 2024, 5:18 am

Screw the consequences and outcomes, I say.

Take a gamble nevermind what everyone thinks and whatever standards imposed, I say.

Nevermind your limbic system and your prefrontal cortex fighting, I say.



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MBlokzyl
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22 Mar 2024, 5:44 am

I’m 52 and just diagnosed a month ago. I learned over the years, actually with the help of OCD podcasts, to not, or stop engaging with repetitive thoughts. It’s something that takes practice. Especially when you have been doing it your whole life like me.



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22 Mar 2024, 1:44 pm

JamesW wrote:
Dr. Camilla Pang in Explaining Humans talks about Bayes' theorem.

It's a formula for working out the probability of interlinked events. I won't do a maths infodump here, but basically you can reduce an unpredictable human situation into a logic problem, i.e. turn 'What is going to happen?' into 'There is an X percent chance of this happening'.

The really good news is that you don't have to know anything about maths to make this work on principle, i.e. it doesn't matter if you get the figures completely wrong - the point is that you get a figure on it at all, instead of the situation just being a chaos of unknowns. For me it has worked wonders in resting my brain.

Interesting. I'm not usually too uncomfortable with letting unknowns remain unknowns, if there's no way of shedding light on them. An arbitrary probability figure wouldn't be likely to help me. When I don't know a thing, I either accept it as a black box or I try to find out by experiment or by reading. Sometimes I might use an arbitrary number or assumption, but that's usually to give me something to test.

I'm probably more uncomfortable with qualitatively not understanding a thing than quantitatively not knowing this or that about it.



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22 Mar 2024, 9:24 pm

If it is a small matter, I'll get distracted and move on soon enough. If it is a big deal, and I've done a good job gathering data and making pro vs con lists, etc, and things are still quite even, I flip a coin. However, I don't necessarily do as the call says. Half the time, as soon as I see the result, I'm disappointed rather than happy, and that is what makes up my mind. The coin is used to evoke my feelings.



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23 Mar 2024, 4:02 am

MBlokzyl wrote:
I’m 52 and just diagnosed a month ago. I learned over the years, actually with the help of OCD podcasts, to not, or stop engaging with repetitive thoughts. It’s something that takes practice. Especially when you have been doing it your whole life like me.


Do you recommend any?


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