We will succeed or not in brining back the mammoth?

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Jamesy
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12 Mar 2024, 6:21 pm

Apparently the the goal is to bring back the wholly mammoth by 2028.

Do you think we will succeed in resurrecting the titanic beast or will there be a lot of hiccups along the way?



cyberdad
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13 Mar 2024, 3:56 am

There's several candidates for resurrection using cloning. The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), the Tasmanian Tiger or thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), and the gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus silus). All of these have DNA samples that can potentially be cloned.

There is a rumour the Japanese have a frozen sabre toothed tiger but no proof yet.



Jono
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13 Mar 2024, 6:54 am

The mammoth was uniquely adapted to living at a time when most of the world was covered in ice. I doubt that they'd survive in todays hot climate, especially as the global warming problem get's worse. There's no point to bringing them back.



roronoa79
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13 Mar 2024, 8:36 am

I love mammoths as much as the next guy but.......why? Where are they going to live? Siberia? Canada? Patagonia?? What about the animals already living in those ecosystems? What will happen to species that share food sources with hypothetical mammoths? Will their populations partially die off to make room for mammoths? What about carnivores that rely on those other herbivores for their diet? Hunting a mammoth is going to be much harder than hunting a deer. What if the mammoths don't reproduce enough to maintain their population? Will they be dependent on test-tube mammoths? This just sounds like a strange ecological domino effect waiting to happen.
The thylacine seems like a better candidate for revival to me--or any number of other species that died out more recently that weren't evolutionarily adapted to an ice age that has long passed.


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blitzkrieg
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13 Mar 2024, 8:48 am

I agree with the concerns put forth by roronoa.

It sounds a lot like there could be unintended, negative consequences to messing with an ecosystem and inserting a prehistoric animal into an environment that doesn't necessarily support it.



QuantumChemist
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13 Mar 2024, 8:58 am

roronoa79 wrote:
I love mammoths as much as the next guy but.......why? Where are they going to live? Siberia? Canada? Patagonia?? What about the animals already living in those ecosystems? What will happen to species that share food sources with hypothetical mammoths? Will their populations partially die off to make room for mammoths? What about carnivores that rely on those other herbivores for their diet? Hunting a mammoth is going to be much harder than hunting a deer. What if the mammoths don't reproduce enough to maintain their population? Will they be dependent on test-tube mammoths? This just sounds like a strange ecological domino effect waiting to happen.
The thylacine seems like a better candidate for revival to me--or any number of other species that died out more recently that weren't evolutionarily adapted to an ice age that has long passed.


Any mammoths created would need to be protected in zoo-like environment.



RedDeathFlower13
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13 Mar 2024, 10:09 am

Sure, Trump will bring back "Mammon"! :twisted:

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13 Mar 2024, 11:58 am

I don't think it's possible. DNA) degrades too much over thousands of years (I assume)



lostonearth35
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13 Mar 2024, 12:58 pm

Humans are doing virtually nothing to save animals that are still alive from extinction, what makes them think they can just bring back an animal that's been extinct for thousands of years?



roronoa79
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13 Mar 2024, 2:43 pm

lostonearth35 wrote:
Humans are doing virtually nothing to save animals that are still alive from extinction, what makes them think they can just bring back an animal that's been extinct for thousands of years?

Well, what's more likely?
Biologists resurrecting a species from the dead?
Or governments and corporations actually changing policies for the good of the environment?

Seems like we have the answer :|


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cyberdad
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13 Mar 2024, 3:31 pm

roronoa79 wrote:
I love mammoths as much as the next guy but.......why? Where are they going to live? Siberia? Canada? Patagonia?? What about the animals already living in those ecosystems? What will happen to species that share food sources with hypothetical mammoths? Will their populations partially die off to make room for mammoths? What about carnivores that rely on those other herbivores for their diet? Hunting a mammoth is going to be much harder than hunting a deer. What if the mammoths don't reproduce enough to maintain their population? Will they be dependent on test-tube mammoths? This just sounds like a strange ecological domino effect waiting to happen.


All valid points. I think the geneticists would need a substantial number of mammoth samples to experiment with. Secondly if they succeed then the next step would be accessing multiple bodies. As far as I know the baby mammoth found in siberia is the best bet but there might be 1-2 others. At best this is 2-3 genotypes and worst just one. I am not sure this ever going to be a viable population to sustain in the wilderness and mating is questionable even if they get 2-3 (I'm not even sure the gender ratio of the bodies?). If they succeed the mammoth/s will be living in a wilderness park like some type of Jurassic park.

The Thylacine is in the same boat. I don't think there's a viable set of bodies? perhaps 1-2 viable ones. Again a living clone would be so precious no scientist in their right mind would let one free into the Australian wilderness when we have wild dogs and other feral animals that would kill our new Thylacine. Our "Tassie Tiger" would get his/her own park, Fun fact, the now extinct Tasmanian tiger is the state emblem of Tasmania on their coat of arms.

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13 Mar 2024, 3:38 pm

finally!


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13 Mar 2024, 3:39 pm

Jono wrote:
The mammoth was uniquely adapted to living at a time when most of the world was covered in ice. I doubt that they'd survive in todays hot climate, especially as the global warming problem get's worse. There's no point to bringing them back.


The tech is around today to keep them alive in zoo's and I don't see why they won't be able to live in Nordic countries but to be fair, we would probably start eating them again. I know I would.



Jamesy
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13 Mar 2024, 4:49 pm

There was even talk about brining back the Neanderthal



blitzkrieg
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13 Mar 2024, 4:53 pm

Jamesy wrote:
There was even talk about brining back the Neanderthal


Source?



Jamesy
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13 Mar 2024, 5:02 pm

blitzkrieg wrote:
Jamesy wrote:
There was even talk about brining back the Neanderthal


Source?



I can’t remember what source I just remember reading up about it on the internet years ago. Not making it up either.