Management might finally stop questioning my intelligence

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hmk66
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16 Mar 2024, 3:08 pm

A long while ago I applied for an executive secretary at my current employer (after acquiring a related diploma). But thinking I can't handle it (too hight workload), the employer decided to ask a carreer coach to find a job that would be better for me. My employer doesn't like autistic people, but doesn't fire me, because I almost never make severe errors, no-one is complaining, and tasks are completed well before the deadline (in most cases my tasks are completed already on the day I received them).

My previous bosses questioned my intelligence, because they don't believe that I am capable of things, that I think I am. There is a big difference. When I asked them to teach me new things, they refuse, because I won't be able to learn them. They blocked really everything.

In my area there isn't much employment for executive secretaries. Nor are there internship possibilites. In the last meeting between my employer (HR manager), my career coach and me, we came to the conclusion there were no possibilities. My career coach recomends my employer to "open up". He wants the HR manager to look for tasks like planning meetings and appointments, take minutes, answering the phone. Those are mainly executive secretary tasks, but... I am not unfamiliar with parts of those tasks. I know how Outlook Calendar works (not only my calendar but also from other colleagues and rooms (when are they occupied by a meeting, and when they are free and available for meetings, yet to be planned)), in the previous week I found out how making phone calls with Microsoft Teams work. I have some experience at making minutes. So these tasks are not completely new.

It means that my employer must get rid of the idea, that I have a intellectual handicap, while I know I am very highly intelligent. They don't accept that idea, and do believe in the handicap. Now they have to. If I don't try or if they don't let me try something, I won't get anywhere. There will be a difference between high intelligence and alleged intellectual retardation.



rse92
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18 Mar 2024, 2:45 pm

Sure you know that being highly intelligent does not mean being capable. Many, and if I'm being quite honest most, highly intelligent people do not have the other skills necessary to be a good executive secretary. To be honest, high intelligence isn't even one of those skills.

How are your interpersonal skills?



hmk66
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19 Mar 2024, 1:36 pm

rse92 wrote:
Sure you know that being highly intelligent does not mean being capable. Many, and if I'm being quite honest most, highly intelligent people do not have the other skills necessary to be a good executive secretary.

Hard to say. May some are highly intelligent but being an executive secretary does not suit them. But others could be a good executive secretary. I would never know when I don't try. My new boss (location principal) and I myself wants to try it. He wants to talk about this with a colleague boss (boss of an administrative team). He asks me to think about it till next Monday. Then he will talk with his colleague boss (horizontally on the organization diagram). Secondly, most executive secretaries are women (99 % in the Netherlands). After a certain period, he wants to know from me whether I liked it, whether there are unforeseen problems (because of autism or otherwise), then continue to the next step or terminate it (depending on my experiences). He told me, that he wants to be a good employer and a good boss, so he wants to look into it.

Quote:
To be honest, high intelligence isn't even one of those skills.

It doesn't even have to be.

Quote:
How are your interpersonal skills?

I have no clue, to be honest. I am very popular between co-workers. I rarely have serious conflicts. I am extravert when I notice that I am appreciated. Overstimulations are rare. I do agree that interpersonal skills are important (but that is important anyway to work at school, my boss said, regardless what profession someone has). I think there are many things I can handle, without getting angry. But I don't know if I don't try (the same as Pippi Longstocking wanting to buy a piano, while Tommy and Annika think that would not make sense, since Pippi never played piano).

Both interpersonal skills and being a good executive secretary; that is complex calendar management, taking minutes, organizing things, some administrative tasks, office management, project management, perfect knowledge of the Dutch language, being a manager. Working in an administrative team, in a secretariat team, is something I have to, and want to learn. I relate well socially and functionally with other members of the same or adjacent team.