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babybird
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29 Mar 2024, 6:03 pm

Just a question. Something came up in my life just this week and it's blown my mind a way a bit.

Anyway because of this I have a question

What are the chances of a downs syndrome woman giving birth to two healthy children but a out 20 years apart?

I have looked at Google about this but I'm not really seeing much about it other than DS women are able to conceive


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29 Mar 2024, 6:19 pm

https://ndss.org/about#:~:text=Trisomy% ... isjunction)&text=Down%20syndrome%20is%20usually%20caused,the%20egg%20fails%20to%20separate.

The cause of the extra full or partial chromosome is still unknown. Age is the only factor that has been linked to an increased chance of having a baby with Down syndrome resulting from nondisjunction or mosaicism. However, due to higher birth rates in younger women, 51% of children with Down syndrome are born to women under 35 years of age. (De Graaf et al., 2022).



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29 Mar 2024, 6:25 pm

Thank you. I was wondering about a woman with DS giving birth to none DS babies though


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DanielW
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29 Mar 2024, 6:37 pm

A woman with DS paired with a man without DS (a good many of men with DS are sterile) has approximately a 50/50 chance of a healthy child. so having 2 is certainly possible. 20 years apart? there is a greater risk as the mother ages, but I can't find a definitive percentage for the increase in risk.



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29 Mar 2024, 8:28 pm

https://www.marchofdimes.org/find-suppo ... n-syndrome
Being a carrier of a certain type of Down syndrome. If you or your partner are a carrier of translocation Down syndrome, you carry a gene change for the condition, but you don’t actually have Down syndrome. Both men and women can pass translocation Down syndrome on to their children, but it’s rare.

From the earlier link
All three types of Down syndrome are genetic conditions (relating to the genes), but only 1% of all cases of Down syndrome have a hereditary component (passed from parent to child through the genes).



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30 Mar 2024, 3:50 am

Thank you guys. Just found out this week that my paternal grandmother had ds. She had two healthy children (one of them being my father). She died in her late 40s though so it's sad really.


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30 Mar 2024, 10:30 am

This matter has raised a lot of questions for me in my life and I don't know who to turn to about it.

I do thank you all for helping me though and I do understand that you probably can't answer my questions but thank you for trying


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30 Mar 2024, 10:50 am

My wife went to a high risk pregnancy doctor for our youngest after loosing two children in utero. She was given a classification as AMA (advanced maternal age) and given a 33% chance of carrying to term. I then white-knuckled through the rest of the 9 months. Each month they would revise the percentage. I think statistically 1 in 3 pregnancies are carried to term on average even with no other factors. My wife was 45/46 when she was classified AMA. A mother with Downs will need extra support with pregnancy and as a young mother of a young baby I would think. Really, as father of three, we all need support when the baby is small, no-one really does it alone.
If you are concerned about someone you know who is pregnant and has Downs I would start calling hospitals and churches in your area and ask what kind of supports are available, and think carefully about what you yourself can realistically do to support.
Every baby is precious, every baby is a gift. PM me if you want to talk.


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Fenn
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30 Mar 2024, 11:33 am

“If a birthing parent has Down syndrome, the risk of passing the genetic condition onto their future children is 35% to 50%.”

Source:
https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/d ... n-syndrome

I would think the previous child doesn’t change the statistics for the second. Fliping a coin doesn’t change the odds that the next coin flip might be heads or tails regardless of the results of the first flip.
In general the odds of having a baby with Downs increases with maternal age. Not sure how this combines with the above statistic.

Related:

https://www.ncregister.com/interview/pro-life-advocate-with-down-syndrome-being-loved-is-what-makes-people-happy?amp


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30 Mar 2024, 11:49 am

March of Dimes is proud to be a research-focused organization, funding millions of dollars of original scientific research each year.

https://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/mom-ex ... d=50814108

Maybe it would help to read about how support networks help those with Downs Sydrome babies.