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Lost_dragon
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23 Apr 2024, 12:20 pm

Whenever I watch a movie, I keep two things in mind; the year the film was released and what time period the story is set.

I expect cultural and language differences. Although it can be a little awkward when I'm watching an old film and people feel obliged to apologise to me. Relax. I knew what I was getting into. You don't need to apologise to me and frankly it's a little awkward. I know it's well intentioned but I'd rather we just watch the film and discuss it later.

If it's too much, then I'll say so. There are certain tropes I can't stand and I will stop watching the film if they occur. It takes a lot though to deter me from a film.

Admittedly, there are certain films that I struggle with because of the language barrier. English has changed so much over the years. So, if I'm watching a really old film then I might do some research beforehand. That's another topic entirely though.


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ASPartOfMe
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23 Apr 2024, 12:21 pm

TwilightPrincess wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
“Aged not well” can work both ways. The common understanding of the phrase is it looks bad to our more enlightened selves. Plenty of dated films make today look bad. If you avoid old films you run the risk of missing that and material that is quality in any age.

If people thought that making light of sexual harassment and worse was okay then, it would seem that society has progressed in a positive direction in this respect although, as this thread has demonstrated, not everyone was comfortable with the movie when it came out.

I certainly don’t avoid old films. They have been a special interest of mine since I was a teenager. I especially like movies from the 30s through the 60s. Silent films are cool too. Admittedly, I tend not to care for movies from the 70s and 80s quite as much, but there are many exceptions.

I just avoid movies that I find especially distasteful or triggering which is okay. There are many older movies out there that are not nearly so problematic, so it’s not like people are unreasonably limiting themselves when they choose not to watch certain movies. In my experience, the number of options is a bit overwhelming as it is.

Everybody has a choice and people do react differently to portrayals. All choices have a risk.

The term and concept of sexual harassment was not coined until the mid 70s and it specifically referred to the workplace. It would not become mainstream until the 1991 Clarance Thomas nomination hearings. The concept of objectifying women was around in the 70s and feminists did picket theaters where porn(“porno” was the term at the time) films were playing. In the ‘80s there was objections to MTV videos. Criticism of the objectification of women tended to be drowned out by criticism the videos were too sexual or satanic.

Looking back IMHO what made that late 70s and 80s particularly toxic in this regard was the combination of a backlash against feminism and that era occurring after the sexual revolution put in the notion that anything goes.

In the 60s and before slapping women was considered funny.

It the future people will be appalled at things most do not give a thought to today.


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TwilightPrincess
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23 Apr 2024, 1:24 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Looking back IMHO what made that late 70s and 80s particularly toxic in this regard was the combination of a backlash against feminism and that era occurring after the sexual revolution put in the notion that anything goes.
I think that’s a really good point.
ASPartOfMe wrote:
In the 60s and before slapping women was considered funny.
I won’t watch anything like that because it would ruin the entire experience for me. From what I’ve seen, that sort of thing happens more often in old sitcoms than in old movies, but I could be wrong about that. I don’t really like old TV, except for The Twilight Zone which I’ve always been obsessed with.

Judy Holiday’s character gets slapped in the movie Born Yesterday, but it’s treated seriously, not as some joke.

I can tolerate subtle to moderate sexism when it comes to old movies and such but not the more extreme stuff when it’s treated in a lighthearted way or as a joke - stuff that’s extreme enough to traumatize someone if they actually experienced it. Both of my grandmothers were abused by their husbands in the 50s. I doubt they appreciated seeing women get slapped around or otherwise mistreated either. (My grandmothers bonded over their experiences which brought my parents together, but that’s off-topic. :lol: )

On a different note, I might be missing a cultural connection since I’ve never been into campy movies that were solely intended for teenagers.


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bee33
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23 Apr 2024, 11:59 pm

Sexism and misogyny have never been okay. They were not okay in the 50s or 70s and they were not okay 5000 years ago. The only difference is that now there is more public awareness and public speaking out about how wrong it is.



TwilightPrincess
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24 Apr 2024, 11:53 am

An issue that’s not been addressed is that older movies and shows were typically written, directed, produced, etc. by men so there wasn’t much input from women. Then people watch them and think that that was the norm and that women must’ve been comfortable with whatever because “it was a different time.”

Quote:
Grease is a 1978 American musical romantic comedy film directed by Randal Kleiser (in his feature directorial debut) from a screenplay by Bronté Woodard and an adaptation by co-producer Allan Carr, based on the stage musical of the same name by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grease_(film)

^ All men. Maybe Grease is more of a male fantasy. :chin:

In a movie about heterosexual romance and sexuality in particular, ideally, there’d be input from men AND women, especially during a time when sexism was quite a bit more pronounced than it is today. Of course, sexism kept women out of leadership roles behind the scenes…

Obviously, lots of women have enjoyed the movie, but it’s likely that many found certain things about it unsettling or objectionable. We’re just more likely to talk about it openly now.


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