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blitzkrieg
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30 Apr 2024, 4:09 pm

A link to the article below:

https://www.livescience.com/health/genetics/ptsd-tied-to-95-risk-hotspots-in-the-genome

An excerpt from the article:

"The world's largest-ever genetic study of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has uncovered 95 hotspots in the genome that are tied to the condition, including 80 that were previously unknown.

This treasure trove of genetic data could eventually lead to new therapies for PTSD, scientists say.

PTSD is a mental health condition that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or stressful event. For many, PTSD can become a chronic condition; the chronic form affects about 10% of the general population and 20% to 30% of high risk populations, such as combat survivors and assault victims."



TwilightPrincess
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30 Apr 2024, 9:32 pm

That’s interesting.

I wonder what the rate of PTSD is among people who’ve experienced multiple traumas/were in long term abusive situations. It seems like if you experience enough s**t it’s going to effect you profoundly at some point. Maybe we all just have different limits.

Some interesting data from a study regarding childhood cumulative trauma:
“The lifetime PTSD risk increased 28% with each different type of childhood trauma when adjusted by confounds. Our study strengthens the evidence associating childhood cumulative trauma to increased lifetime PTSD risk.”
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... i-endpoint

Another study regarding teenagers:
“Our findings indicate that adolescents exposed to multiple traumas are more likely to experience more severe symptoms of PTSD and depression than those who experience a single event, with this effect independent of childhood adversity and everyday stressful life experiences.”
https://scholars.mssm.edu/en/publicatio ... ttraumatic

With me, I could manage a fair amount of trauma, but I reached a point where something broke. I don’t know how else to describe it.


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babybird
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01 May 2024, 1:46 am

I don't understand all that science stuff me

I think some people must be more predisposed to it though

I've probably had it all my life so I think it's kind of weaved into my personality


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blitzkrieg
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01 May 2024, 5:55 am

TwilightPrincess wrote:
That’s interesting.
:wtg:

TwilightPrincess wrote:
I wonder what the rate of PTSD is among people who’ve experienced multiple traumas/were in long term abusive situations. It seems like if you experience enough s**t it’s going to effect you profoundly at some point. Maybe we all just have different limits.


I think the limit thing is important. For some people I imagine, their genes will make PTSD more prominent and perhaps that might prolong distress from the traumatic memories they have from abuse, or the genes might make episodic memory more enhanced for those people? The article didn't really specify and I don't know much about PTSD, but yeah, certainly, every individual will experience things differently and have different limits.

TwilightPrincess wrote:
Some interesting data from a study regarding childhood cumulative trauma:
“The lifetime PTSD risk increased 28% with each different type of childhood trauma when adjusted by confounds. Our study strengthens the evidence associating childhood cumulative trauma to increased lifetime PTSD risk.”
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... i-endpoint


This is an interesting article. Thank you for posting. I found this little bit interesting at a first glance:

"Childhood traumas rise the likelihood of adulthood PTSD caused by other traumas."

TwilightPrincess wrote:
Another study regarding teenagers:
“Our findings indicate that adolescents exposed to multiple traumas are more likely to experience more severe symptoms of PTSD and depression than those who experience a single event, with this effect independent of childhood adversity and everyday stressful life experiences.”
https://scholars.mssm.edu/en/publicatio ... ttraumatic


The adolescent years are important formative years, so that doesn't surprise me.

TwilightPrincess wrote:
With me, I could manage a fair amount of trauma, but I reached a point where something broke. I don’t know how else to describe it.


Yeah, I think that is normal for PTSD sufferers.



blitzkrieg
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01 May 2024, 5:58 am

babybird wrote:
I don't understand all that science stuff me

I think some people must be more predisposed to it though

I've probably had it all my life so I think it's kind of weaved into my personality


The science stuff can be hard to wrap one's head around in any domain. For me personally, I only really started being able to digest scientific content when I had pushed/punished myself through enough education. It didn't come naturally.

I am sorry to hear of your PTSD, babybird. You don't really mention it much so I don't really associate you with PTSD necessarily.



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01 May 2024, 6:50 am

blitzkrieg wrote:
I think the limit thing is important. For some people I imagine, their genes will make PTSD more prominent and perhaps that might prolong distress from the traumatic memories they have from abuse, or the genes might make episodic memory more enhanced for those people? The article didn't really specify and I don't know much about PTSD, but yeah, certainly, every individual will experience things differently and have different limits.

I was suggesting that since cumulative trauma increases the risks for PTSD, genetics may be less and less important the more abuse/traumas one experiences. Experiencing one trauma, especially if one has a lot of support, is a bit different than experiencing many events/prolonged abuse, not that I’m undermining single events. There’s a lot of variation with those too.


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blitzkrieg
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01 May 2024, 6:52 am

TwilightPrincess wrote:
I was suggesting that since cumulative trauma increases the risks for PTSD, genetics may be less and less important the more abuse/traumas one experiences. Experiencing one trauma, especially if one has a lot of support, is a bit different than experiencing many events/prolonged abuse, not that I’m undermining single events. There’s a lot of variation with those too.


Oh, okay.

Thank you for clarifying what you meant with your previous post.