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shortfatbalduglyman
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16 Jun 2024, 10:41 pm

What is your experience with being a cashier, security guard, manual laborer, or janitor?

How did autism affect your performance?

What kind of unskilled jobs are good for autistics?



bee33
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17 Jun 2024, 12:12 am

The only one I have experience with is being a cashier, and it was great. It depends where one works, I suppose. When I worked at an independently owned store that sold stationery and craft supplies it was great. It was 30 years ago and the store owner is still a Facebook friend. I also worked at a museum gift shop as a cashier, and it was great as far as coworkers, less so for management.

I assume you're considering cashiering at Home Depot. I think interaction with customers is actually fairly minimal beyond saying what they owe and taking their credit card or cash. For me the hardest thing would be standing.



JamesW
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17 Jun 2024, 4:29 am

What is your experience with being a cashier, security guard, manual laborer, or janitor?

As a kid I sold wine and vegetables. I was happy in both jobs. They were small local independent shops, and the boss and other staff were like a family.

How did autism affect your performance?

Only a little. I could be too meticulous in aligning the bottles on the shelves and in the cellar. And sometimes I could talk to the customers too much instead of getting them out of the shop so that the next customer could be served. In a small shop that wasn't a problem. In a large or chain shop it would probably have got me into trouble.

What kind of unskilled jobs are good for autistics?

I may be stretching the definition of 'unskilled' here. I wanted to mention software testing, but I think that counts as a skill.

I know autistic people who do freelance data entry jobs for public and private services. The work is simple and repetitive, but detailed. Precision is important. The tasks are well-defined and linear; there is no multitasking or sudden changes of focus; it's not people-facing; it can often be done working from home, depending on the sensitivity of the data. The advantage with being freelance is that the focus is on the work alone, rather than the other stuff that often goes with being part of a company (team bonding, social events etc.) which autistic people (speaking only for myself) don't handle very well.